Using 3d Printers

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  • Topic: 3D printing, Inkjet printer, Fused deposition modeling
  • Pages : 4 (1298 words )
  • Download(s) : 76
  • Published : May 14, 2013
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Using 3D printers as production tools has become known in industry as “additive” manufacturing. The additive process requires less raw material and, because software drives 3D printers, each item can be made differently without costly retooling. The printers can also produce ready-made objects that require less assembly and things that traditional methods would struggle with—such as the glove pictured above, made by Within Technologies, a London company. It can be printed in nylon, stainless steel or titanium. adv:

The printing of parts and products has the potential to transform manufacturing because it lowers the costs and risks. No longer does a producer have to make thousands, or hundreds of thousands, of items to recover his fixed costs. In a world where economies of scale do not matter any more, mass-manufacturing identical items may not be necessary or appropriate, especially as 3D printing allows for a great deal of customisation. Indeed, in the future some see consumers downloading products as they do digital music and printing them out at home, or at a local 3D production centre, having plan the designs to their own tastes. That is probably a faraway dream. Nevertheless, a new industrial revolution may be on the way.

Any surplus powder can be reused. Some objects may need a little machining to finish, but they still require only 10% of the raw material that would otherwise be needed. Moreover, the process uses less energy than a conventional factory. It is sometimes faster, too.

The researchers at Filton have a much bigger ambition: to print the entire wing of an airliner. Lightness is critical in making aircraft. A reduction of 1kg in the weight of an airliner will save around $3,000-worth of fuel a year and by the same token cut carbon-dioxide emissions. Additive manufacturing could thus help build greener aircraft—especially if all the 1,000 or so titanium parts in an airliner can be printed.

Custom-made servos cost many times the price of...
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