Six Sigma & Process Improvement

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CHAPTER 11
SIX SIGMA AND PROCESS IMPROVEMENT

TRUE/FALSE QUESTIONS

1.In Six Sigma, a problem is defined as a deviation between what should be happening and what actually is happening that is important enough to need correcting. Answer: T
AACSB: Analytic Skills

2.Half the tolerance is equal to the distance from the target to the upper specification limit. Answer: T
AACSB: Analytic Skills

3.A change in the quality level from 3-sigma to 4-sigma represents a five-fold improvement. Answer: F
AACSB: Analytic Skills

4.3.4 defects per million opportunities can occur with a quality level of 5-sigma if the mean shift is 0.5 standard deviations of the target. Answer: T
AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills

5.A Six Sigma quality level means that the difference between the upper and lower specification limits is six standard deviations. Answer: F
AACSB: Analytic Skills

6.Six Sigma represents a quality level of 3.4 defects per million opportunities when the process mean is held exactly on target. Answer: F
AACSB: Analytic Skills

7.Unstructured problems require more creative approaches to solving them than structured problems. Answer: T
AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills

8.The expectations of customers that matter most to them are known as “critical to quality” issues in Six Sigma terminology. Answer: T
AACSB: Analytic Skills
9.Bottom-up projects generally are tied to business strategy and are aligned with customer needs. Answer: F
AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills

10.A Six Sigma project might span an entire division or be as narrow as a single production operation. Answer: T
AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills

11.One of the pitfalls experienced in organizations new to Six Sigma is the inability of senior managers to estimate what the resources, they allocate to Six Sigma projects, will “buy” in the way of bottom-line returns. Answer: T

AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills

12.At the outset of a Six Sigma initiative, projects chosen should have a high likelihood of success. Answer: T
AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills

13.“Low hanging fruit” refers to apparent quality problems that have existed for some time and past attempts to correct them have failed. Answer: F
AACSB: Analytic Skills

14.The improvement methodologies proposed by Deming, Juran, and Crosby have common themes which are shared in the Six Sigma approach. Answer: T
AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills

15.The process of drilling down to a more specific problem statement is sometimes called “project scoping.” Answer: T
AACSB: Analytic Skills

16.Idea gathering is done in the Analyze phase of DMAIC.
Answer: F

17.The Control phase of DMAIC focuses on how to maintain improvements. Answer: T
AACSB: Analytic Skills

18.The focus on optimizing CTQs for Six Sigma product and system performance by balancing cost, schedule, and quality is known as Design for Six Sigma. Answer: T
AACSB: Analytic Skills

19.Within the service sector, Six Sigma is beginning to be called “transactional Six Sigma.” Answer: T
AACSB: Analytic Skills

20.Lean production can easily be applied to non-manufacturing environments. Answer: T
AACSB: Reflective Thinking Skills

MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS

1.Determining the most likely causes of defects occurs during which DMAIC phase? a. Define
b. Measure
c. Analyze
d. Improve
Answer: c
AACSB: Analytic Skills

2.Six Sigma represents a quality level of at most:
a. 1.5 defects per million opportunities.
b. 2.0 defects per million opportunities.
c. 3.4 defects per million opportunities.
d. 4.5 defects per million opportunities.
Answer: c
AACSB:...
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