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English Reflection Paper
Lorenzo Mendoza 3/5/13
R12
The Road to the Present
All of us have that one thing that seems to take an extremely large part of our lives. Some of us resort to playing video games, sports or writing. If we’re lucky then eventually we get to work with experts and get their input to improve what we do. If we’re really lucky then we may get to indulge in our passion without direct monetary cost. If ever we are lucky enough to be able to do what we love and get paid for it, then you really know that fortune really has smiled down on you. This thing whether we realize it or not does help shape how we grow and who we end up being, or at the very least, it did in my case. This is the story of the event that started my life in music and how music made me who I am today.

In November of 2009 I had just had my very first recital in The Music School of Ryan Cayabyab. It was a recital for instrumentalists, in my case it was the guitar. Typically students would just play their instrument, whereas my teacher requested that I sing while playing. After the recital my parents asked me if I would be interested in taking voice lessons. At first I was rather hesitant because I had heard of some horror stories of singers who took lessons or went to a conservatory of music and did not benefit from it due to incorrect techniques taught by the particular school. One example would be the story of some classical singers who could no longer use their head voices after training because of how they abused their voices. Eventually though I did give in to my parents suggestion of taking voice lessons there. This is when I met Malvin Macasaet, he’s a tenor (the highest voice classification for a male) who graduated from the UP Conservatory of Music. In the early days of my voice lessons it was clear that I had very little idea of what I was doing. I can tell you now that, looking back, my technique had a very, very long way to go. I was being introduced to a lot of concepts that I really did not understand. It was difficult for me to notice the different nuances of the voice back then. I’m very thankful to have had a teacher like Malvin because not only did he really know what he was talking about, but he was also very patient and understanding, having been in my place before.

In March of the next year I had my first ever audition when I auditioned for the music school’s summer recital of 2010. After passing the audition and getting a solo I met Mrs. Emmy Cayabyab, who would eventually be the other person that became a mentor to me. I was told by the music school secretaries that there would be auditions for a scholarship there, so I thought “Why not?” Even though I had only one night to prepare I somehow had managed to pass the first audition, and again, much to my surprise I was able to pass all the auditions and made it to the MusiKabataan program, which was sponsored by Music Museum. So besides my normal studies I would go to the music school on the weekends for the classes and my individual voice lessons. In the scholarship we studied music, performance, movement and song interpretation under the guidance of Mrs. Cayabyab and Kyla Rivera. To be completely honest there were a lot of times wherein I felt that I was nowhere near the level of my co-scholars. That said, these people not only inspired me to improve, but also became like a second family to me. Kyrsty Alde, Francine Arcillia, Moxy Arima, Maru Boliche, Nina Gonzales, Rafael Gutierrez, Banjo Gonzales and Mika Gomez, I have never met a group of people as talented, genuine and supportive as these people are. Before meeting them, the only “friends” I had were my batchmates. I had gotten used to being in that all-boy school with the same people for 11 years at that point in time. I’d gotten used to a certain standard of friendship and a certain way of treating people; it was only when I met these people when I...
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