Marketing Research

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Marketing Research (MKTG 311)

Dr. Raoul V. Kübler

Assistant Professor for Marketing

Marketing Research (MKTG 311)

Dr. Raoul V. Kübler

Assistant Professor for Marketing

The Marketing Research Process

Session 3

LEARNING OUTCOMES

1. Classify marketing research as either exploratory research, descriptive research, or causal research. 2. List the major stages of the marketing research process and the steps within each. 3. Understand the concepts of theory and hypothesis and the critical role they play in research. 4. Know the difference between a research project and a research program.

Marketing Research - Spring 2013 - Dr. Raoul V. Kübler

2

Key ways in which researchers contribute to decision making: 1. Helping to better define the current situation 2. Defining the firm—determining how consumers, competitors, and employees view the firm 3. Providing ideas for product improvements or possible new product development 4. Testing ideas that will assist in implementing the marketing mix strategy for the firm 5. Examining how correct a certain marketing theory is in a given situation

Marketing Research - Spring 2013 - Dr. Raoul V. Kübler

5

Types of Marketing Research
• Exploratory • Descriptive • Causal

Marketing Research - Spring 2013 - Dr. Raoul V. Kübler

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Exploratory Research
• Exploratory Research
• Conducted to clarify ambiguous situations or discover ideas that may be potential business opportunities. • Initial research conducted to clarify and define the nature of a problem. • Does not provide conclusive evidence • Subsequent research expected

• Particularly useful in new product development. • Exploratory Research and Problem Solving • Symptoms – observable cues that serve as a signal of a problem because they are caused by that problem.

Marketing Research - Spring 2013 - Dr. Raoul V. Kübler

7

Example

Tupperware Isn’t Alone in Sealing the Deal

• House
 party
 direct
 selling
  is
 making
 a
 comeback
  interna>onally. • And
 it’s
 not
 just
  Tupperware
 anymore!

Marketing Research - Spring 2013 - Dr. Raoul V. Kübler

8

Descriptive Research
• Describes characteristics of objects, people, groups, organizations, or environments. • Addresses who, what, when, where, why, and how questions. • Considerable understanding of the nature of the problem • Does not provide direct evidence of causality.

• Diagnostic analysis
• Seeks to diagnose reasons for market outcomes and focuses specifically on the beliefs and feelings consumers have about and toward competing products.

Marketing Research - Spring 2013 - Dr. Raoul V. Kübler

9

Example

We know who you are...
Who
 likes
 what?
 And
 can
 we
 tell
  who
 you
 are
 by
 what
 you
 like?
  Analysis
 of
 60.000
 Facebook
 Likes
Items Single Smoker Alcohol Drug
 Usage Caucasian
Predic>on
  Rate

67
 % 73
 % 70
 % 65
 % 95
 %

Christ/Moslem 82
 % Republican Homosexual Lesbian Gender 85
 % 88
 % 75
 % 93
 %

Kosinski, M., Stillwell D.J., Graepel, T. (2013) Private traits and attributes are predictable from digital records of human behavior. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), forthcoming Marketing Research - Spring 2013 - Dr. Raoul V. Kübler 9

Causal Research
• Research conducted to identify cause and effect relationships (inferences). • Evidence of causality: • Temporal sequence—the appropriate causal order of events. • Concomitant variation—two phenomena vary together. • Nonspurious association—an absence of alternative plausible explanations. Marketing Research - Spring 2013 - Dr. Raoul V. Kübler 10

Example

What explains the number of shark attacks?
Latest
 reports
 on
 shark
 incidents
 have
 a
  nega>ve
 impact
 on
 image
 and
  reserva>ons.
 Hence
 management
 wants
  you...
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