Henry Purcell Research

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HENRY PURCELL
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-WyxbwU82A – The Fairy Queen Another great hit was Dido and Aeneaus
The Fairy Queen:
* Secular
* The libretto is an anonymous adaptation of William Shakespeare's ‘A Midsummer Night's Dream’. * First performed in 1692, The Fairy-Queen was composed three years before Purcell's death * Consists of two recorders, two oboes, two trumpets, kettledrums, string instruments and harpsichord continuo. Henry Purcell (10 September 1659 – 21 November 1695), was an English composer. Although incorporating Italian and French stylistic elements into his compositions, Purcell's legacy was a uniquely English form of Baroque music. He is generally considered to be one of the greatest English composers; no other native-born English composer approached his fame until Edward Elgar. Although he only lived until he was 36 he wrote a very large amount of music. His compositions include church music, instrumental music, music for the theatre, even popular drinking songs. He embraced his Englishness in his songs, seeming very patriotic and proud of his nation. He used homophonic textures and polyphony to portray contrast. Made a total of 698 pieces of music

He was very close the Queen Mary, his songs were played at her funeral. He was a father of 6, 4 of whom died in infancy. His son, Edward proceeded to become an organist of St Clement Eastcheap, (London, in 1711) and daughter, Frances (named after Henry’s wife), outlived him. As the son of a musician at Court, a chorister at the Chapel Royal, and the holder of continuing royal appointments until his death, Purcell worked in Westminster for three different Kings In the Chapel Royal at a young age, Purcell studied with Dr. John Blow. Legend has it that when, in 1679, Purcell succeeded Dr. Blow as organist of Westminster Abbey, the elder musician stepped aside in recognition of the greater genius, and it is true that on Purcell's death in 1695 Blow returned to the post, and...
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