Business Forum

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1. Ch. 6 - 7  --  You are the administrative assistant for a division chief in a large holding company that owns several hotels and theme parks. You and the division chief have just come from the CEO’s office, where you were informed that the guest complaints related to housekeeping and employee attitude are increasing. Your on-site managers have mentioned some tension among workers, but have not considered it unusual. The CEO and your division chief instruct you to investigate. Suggest at least three different types of research that might be appropriate to the situation.

This research would be classified as an exploratory study. There is a loose basis for what the researcher wants to figure out. Through an exploratory study, the researcher can begin to further develop a hypothesis. The other degree of research question crystallization is a formal study, which is much more precise and involves a previously formulated hypothesis. After establishing the type of study, one could use an experience survey to better understand the types of complaints. This would be used to survey customers on how they felt about their experience within the company. Some questions to be asked in an experience survey could include:

-How would you rate your overall experience?
-What are some things the company could improve on?
-Have you ever been here before?
-Will you be a returning customer?
-Were there any employees that you would like to acknowledge for service excellence?

Lastly, the researcher could make these experience surveys longitudinal studies. A longitudinal study is research that “is repeated over an extended period of time (Cooper and Schindler, 2011, p. 142).” This aids the company to keep up with the complaints, and make sure that if they do improve, that the improvement has longevity.

2. Ch. 6 - 10  --  Use the eight design descriptors in Exhibit 6-3 to profile the research described in the Chapter Snapshots.

Cheskin Knows Teens
A. Degree of Research Question Crystallization: Exploratory study. Cheskin began research without a hypothesis. They merely wanted to gather data on a large group of teenagers. B. Method of Data Collection: A mix of monitoring and communication. Cheskin monitored the teens by visiting common teen hangouts and observing their behavior, and they communicated with the teens by asking for photographs and interviewing groups of teen friends. C. Researcher Control of Variables: Ex post facto design. The researchers did not have any control over the variables, as they wanted honest, unbiased, and unmanipulated data about teens. D. Purpose of the Study: Reporting. It provided a summary of data about teens to achieve an understanding of the group for marketing purposes. E. Time Dimension: Longitudinal study. Due to the in-depth style of research, one can determine that this investigation was carried out over an extended period of time. F. Topical Scope: Statistical study. The investigation was to capture the teenagers’ characteristics by gathering data from the characteristics of a sample of teenagers. G. Research Environment: Field conditions. Cheskin studied the teens in their own environments, ie. At home, with friends, and at their common hangouts. One could also argue that because some teens were brought in for interviews, that that could classify as a laboratory condition. H. Participants’ Perceptual Awareness: A mix between actual routine and modified routine. This is a mix because some of the teens were aware that they were being studied when they were asked to send in photographs and be interviewed, while others were unaware that they were being monitored at their local hangout.

Smith Barney’s Benchmark Job Environment Research
A. Degree of Research Question Crystallization: Formal Study. The investigation began with a specific research question and precise procedures. B. Method of Data Collection: Communication. Focus groups and mail...
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