1776 Book Review 1

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 176
  • Published : June 19, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
History 1301
April 1st 2012
McCullough, David. 1776. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2005, 386 pp. Word Count- 1157

David McCullough’s novel 1776 is a compelling story of America’s war for independence. We have all read chapters and heard the related history of the war of 1776, but David McCullough takes the epic story even further. The book covers the entire year of 1776 from the beginning of the war until the end. The author provides an extremely detailed description of both sides of the conflict both American and British. David McCullough is a renowned author and historian and has twice won the Pulitzer Prize for two of his novels; John Adams and Truman, and with reading 1776 you can see exactly why he is so celebrated. His ability to describe the events surrounding the war is impeccable taking the reader deeper into the war keeping it detailed and energetic, focusing on critical events crucial to the epic battles throughout the war. Rarely within the book does the author allow the reader to become bored or overwhelmed with the information. As assumed, the author derives his information from numerous credible sources which is well documented in the last 86 pages of the book. Along with the multitude of historical data about the war of 1776, he also incorporates an abundant amount of letters from Generals, solders, and various family members to help paint the picture of the war from both sides.

The beginning of the book puts the reader in Britain on the day of October 26th, 1775 and they are preparing to go to war with America. The author skips a lot of the issues leading up the war causing America’s desire to break from Britain rule. It starts with King George III’s procession and gives you the idea of all the pageantry and formality in Britain. He describes King George III as a humble man with a good nature, which is not exactly the way I ever pictured the King. It goes on to describe in great detail the controversy with going to war with...
tracking img