1776 Book Review

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1776, the year of our Independence, has been told through the incredible penmanship of author David McCullough for the sake of educating us common folk on the events of that year. He focuses primarily on the military aspects of the Revolution, such as the battles at Dorchester Heights, Long Island, and Trenton. Furthermore, he went through the military chain of command for both the Americans and the British. Prestigious general William Howe led the redcoats against the Americans, who were led by general George Washington. Henry Knox, a thirty-five year old bookseller, and Nathaniel Green, a Quaker at the age of twenty five, were both inexperienced generals in Washington’s army. The book actually begins in October of 1775 with King George the third declaring the American colonies in a state of rebellion. Once we hit the year 1776, the battle of Bunker Hill begins. Even though the rebels technically lost that battle, the author points out the heavy loses that the British had. Soon after this defeat, the Americans secure Boston by placing stolen cannons high around the harbor. Seeing their imminent doom, the British were forced to retreat. This book didn’t just tell the events as they happened like most non-fiction history books do, it was told like a story. Although most of this book was predictable, seeing as I had prior knowledge to these events, the author kept me on the edge of my seat from start to finish. It described perfectly the struggles and hardships the Americans experienced throughout the year. From the smallpox epidemic to the unusually cold winter, it kept me mesmerized like no nonfiction book has ever done before. David McCullough has done the impossible in making an interesting history book. Also, it was very easy to follow going in chronological order of events. This book was so captivating that I found it difficult to put the book down. More often than not I would choose reading over sleep. It was so beautifully written that as a...
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