What Impact did the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804 have on Haiti and the Wider Caribbean?

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The impact of the Haitian Revolution | What impact did the Haitian revolution of 1781-1804 have on Haiti and the wider Caribbean? | | Name Of Candidate: Chad Miller | School: Kingston CollegeCenter Number: 100057Candidate Number: | Teacher Ms. Nyame | 1/24/2013 | |

What impact did the Haitian Revolution of the 1781-1804 have on Haiti and the wider Caribbean?
The Haitian revolution had started for several reasons the collapse of the French monarchy, the existence of a large mixed race-class and the extreme conditions in St Domingue .The revolution led to the complete abolition of slavery in St Domingue. It brought about the emergence of some influential leaders such as Toussaint L’ouverture a domestic slave who became a steward of all the livestock on his master’s estate, Boukman Dutty who was a Jamaican born who practise vodun (voodoo). He was sold by his British master to a French plantation whose owner but him as a slave driver, Jean Francois was a fugitive from the North America who became a maroon long before the revolt began, Jorge Biassou was a son of slaves. He commanded the army of 40,000 slaves and Jean Jacques Dessalines he was born in slavery who later became the Emperor of Haiti. This severely changed Haiti’s economic status. The country’s infrastructure, such as roads harbours and bridges, was destroyed and sugar production. In 1971 73,000 tons of sugar was exported by 1804 this had drop to 20,500 tons which led to changes in Haiti’s changes in Haiti’s agricultural policies. This also led to the exodus of whites from the island and despoliation of the land Conflict and Neglect had impoverished the ‘Pearl of the Antilles’. Haiti became the first free black coloured state in the Caribbean. The political impact Haiti had on itself was long term but it was not good.

Pictures of Haitian Revolution and leaders

Haitian revolution war

Conclusion

Acknowledgement

Bibliography



Bibliography: Table of Content Introduction In the late 18th century Haiti (St Domingue) began to show an uprising with enslaved Africans for their rites. This uprising in the 18th century Haiti transpired initially due to levels of unrest between the resident white planters and free coloureds but was ultimately triggered by the enslaved Africans’ overwhelming desire for freedom and equality with both groups. Despite these similar encounters, this would be the first successful rebellion among the enslaved Africans in the Caribbean. The Haitian revolution was one in which had a great impact on both Haiti and the wider Caribbean economically. The Haitian revolution had an impact on the Caribbean economically and it was also used by abolitionist to justify their anti-slavery views. Cuba, Jamaica and Puerto Rico received planters of St Domingue and were able to use the skills of these émigrés to boost their economic success. In the years of the revolution it motivated several Caribbean countries Jamaica, St Vincent, Grenada in 1795 causing minor revolts in these islands. The constant decline of St Domingue’s coffee and sugar industries offered the opportunity of increased prosperity in these sectors in other regional colonies, as well. The shortage of sugar in Europe following the outbreak of the Haitian revolution, favoured the British West Indies in the immediate post –Revolutionary years by increasing prices in the English and European market.

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