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Annotated Bibliography: The Haitian Revolution

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Annotated Bibliography: The Haitian Revolution
Sebastian Dameus
Mr.Owens
Haitian Revolution
11/09/16
Annotated Bibliography
Primary Sources
1. Brown, William. “Haitian Revolution.” Slave Resistance: A Caribean Study. N.p., Web. 09. 2016
• This website describe how there were two types of slaves and how the slave owners would discriminate. The two types of slaves were the mulattoes and fully black slaves. Mulattoes were mixed/ half whit and half black slaves so they were threated better.

2. Baggins, Brian. "History of TheHaitian Independence Struggle1791-1804." History of the Haitian Independence Struggle 1791-1804. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Nov. 2016.
• This article talks about as it says in the citation the struggles between 1791and 1804. It will give readers ant idea of what was going on
…show more content…
The article also shares the background information about the large amount of wealth maintained by the people of St. Dominique.
2. Hickey, D.R. (1982). America's response to the slave revolt in Haiti, 1791-1806. Journal of the Early Republic, 2(4), 361-379.
• The United States gained a large amount of sugar and molasses from the French colony of St. Domingue on the western coast of Hispaniola. This shows you how it would affect the US
3. Peguero, V. (1998). Teaching the Haitian revolution: its place in western and modern world history. The History Teacher, 32(1), 33-41.
• This article shares information about making connections between the Haitian slave revolt and revolutionary and abolitionist ideas. As the first successful slave revolt, America acquired the Louisiana Territory as an indirect result of this revolt.
4. Matthewson, T. (1995). Jefferson and Haiti. The Journal of Southern History, 61(2), 209-248.
• This article shares the many views of Thomas Jefferson on the issue of slavery and how Haiti shaped his views. The author outlines the ways that the French attempt to regain control over St. Domingue. Finally, the article provides a connection from the slave revolt to the Louisiana

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