Theoretical Orientation

Powerful Essays
Cognitive Behavior Therapy My personal theoretical orientation to counseling is Cognitive-Behavioral therapy. Cognitive-Behavioral therapy helps the client to uncover and alter distortions of thought or perceptions which may be causing or prolonging psychological distress. The theoretical foundations of CBT are essentially those of the behavioral and cognitive approaches. CBT leads to a clear, persuasive, and evidence-based description of how normal and abnormal behavior develops and changes (Kramer 293). The term “cognitive-behavioral therapy” or CBT is a term for therapies with many similarities. CBT is not used as a cure and often times used to help with anxiety or depression the most, and may be single or in group settings. There are several approaches to this form of therapy which include, Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy, Rational Behavior Therapy, Rational Living Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Dialectic Behavior Therapy. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is based on the idea that our thoughts cause our feelings and behaviors. External things, like people, situations, and events do not. The greatest benefit of this fact is that we can change the way we think, feel, act, and even more so if the situation does not change. In the development of methods of CBT, findings from basic research on the key concepts have been blended with cognitive theories. The most important of these findings are the following: The first is depressive behavior, including low energy, lack of interest, helplessness, and other reductions in psychomotor activity, can be successfully modified with behavioral techniques. The second one is exposure therapy and related methods are particularly effective interventions for many disorders. The last one is that behavioral interventions can be highly useful in helping clients improve coping, social, and problem-solving skills. CBT frequently uses behavioral interventions such as activity scheduling and graded task assignments to reactivate the


References: Blenkiron, Paul. "Cognitive Behavioral Therapy." Royal College of Psychiatrists. The Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2011. Web. 1 Dec 2010. http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/mentalhealthinfoforall/treatments. Kramer G., Bernstein D. Phares V. "Cognitive-Behavior therapy." Behavioral and Cognitive- Behavioral Psychotherapies. Comp. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2009. Print. Mulhauser, Greg. "An Introduction to Cognitive Therapy & Cognitive Behavioral Approaches." Counselling Resource. Counselling Resource, 02 Nov 2010. Web. 1 Dec 2010. http://counsellingresource.com/types/cognitive-therapy/index.html. Pucci, Aldo. "Techniques/Methods." What is Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy? 2010: 1. Web. 27 Nov 2010. Pucci, Aldo. "Therapeutic Relationship." What is Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy? 2010: 1. Web. 27 Nov 2010. Rubarth, Scott. "Stoic Philosophy of Mind." IEP, 2005. Web. Unknown, Author. "CBT Techniques I." CUNY Edu. 2010. Web. 1 Dec 2010. Wright, Jesse H. "Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basic Principles and Recent Advances.” American Psychiatric Association. IV.2 (2006): 6. Print.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Throughout this course I have taken great interested in Cognitive Behavioral Theory or (CBT) which was developed in the 1960s by Albert Ellis and Aaron Beck. CBT is a therapeutic technique that underlies with other different theories, which also focused on the “here and now”. Put simply, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy changes one’s dysfunctional behaviors and/or thoughts to more realistic and healthy ones. This type of therapy encompasses a number of therapies focusing on the impact of an individual’s thinking as it conveys to expressed behaviors.…

    • 1552 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Cbt and Diversity

    • 1198 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is recommended by the NICE guidelines as an effective treatment for many mental health problems, specifically depression and all of the anxiety disorders.…

    • 1198 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    There are two components to the CBT family; Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy (REBT) and Cognitive Therapy (CT). Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy was developed by psychiatrist, Dr. Albert Ellis. REBT takes a comprehensive approach to psychological treatment that deals with the emotional and behavioral aspects of human disturbance, but with emphasis on the cognitive component (Gomathy & Singh, 2007). Ellis believed that psychological problems originate from misperceptions and mistaken cognitions about what was perceived. Additionally, problems also occur from emotional under reactions or over reactions to normal and unusual stimuli; and from habitual dysfunctional behavior patterns which enabled them to keep repeating non-adjustive responses…

    • 111 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy it is a way of talking about, how you think about yourself, the world and other people and how what you do affects your thoughts and feelings.…

    • 2816 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Philosophy of Counseling

    • 315 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Part of finding the most appropriate personal theoretical approach is to first be authentic. Authenticity will assist one in choosing an appropriate theoretical approach which fits with personal beliefs. Therefore, I chose Cognitive Behavioral Theory because it helps me to be the most effective counselor. I am able to easily apply the techniques because it fits so well with my personality, therefore sessions are more authentic when I am true to who I am as a counselor. When I am passionate about what I believe in I am better able to build substantial therapeutic relationships with my clients, sharpen my cognitive-behavioral tools, and continue to grow as a counselor. Also CBT can be used for a wide variety of disorders therefore easily utilized with almost any client.…

    • 315 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Psychology Methods

    • 1253 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Today’s psychology is assembled with a huge variety of techniques, therapies, and approaches based on different models and theories of development and human behavior. When it comes to counseling, it is great to have the proper knowledge of various tools, so that a counselor’s professional behavior allows him or her to be flexible and to apply different techniques based on the individual’s problems and situational needs of every client who is seen. With there being a variety of different techniques, there are two counseling theories that are different, and their effectiveness comes from opposite sides of counseling, but they are very similar in the same way. These approaches are known as the Client-Centered Approach and the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. It is important that good therapists are properly equipped with both concepts and are readily aware on how both of these concepts are used so they can help the client in the best possible way needed.…

    • 1253 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    I like your detailed overview of Dr. Buckley and Dr. Marszalekt’s insight on theoretical orientation. I agree with the two doctors that using a self-assessment and self-reflection as tools will help evaluate aspects of our theoretical approach in practice(Laureate Education, 2012). After several courses, i can fully understand that our theories orientation will most likely continue to develop after our graduate program. I am fully aware that as i progress throughout my counseling career i will grow, and will be exposed to a number of theories, experiences, and situations which will play a part in determining what my theoretical orientation will be. Good post…

    • 104 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    As I previously mentioned, I would use integrative approaches based on the individual and their presenting problems. When assessing client’s using CBT, I would use a style of questioning to inquire on the client’s view on certain ideas, and use the questions to encourage an alternative point of view; in order to help the client, become more aware of how they reason, in addition to the individual’s automatic thought process through therapy or by assigning homework to do from week to week (Approaches to Counseling, 2016). In other cases, I might need to put particular emphasis on therapeutic goals and intervention strategies, therefore a humanistic approach would be best. During these sessions, I might focus on helping the client understand the way their reality is influenced by their past experiences, present perceptions, and expectations for the future (McLeod, 2015). When using a humanistic approach, it is also important to emphasize the client’s freedom of choice and potential for change, while respecting their subjective experience including their choices and values (Approaches to Counseling, 2016). Although, if the client would benefit more from a psychoanalytic approach, I would use various techniques to encourage the client to develop insight regarding their behavior and the meaning of…

    • 1294 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    CBT does not make an effort to help clients make a philosophical change to their cognition. CBT may be humanistically oriented, but does not require this as REBT does. REBT’s goal is to create a new outlook for the client which will help maintain emotional health in all future situation; CBT’s focus is on symptom removal at the present situation. CBT teaches its client to develop self-esteem or a positive rating for themselves as a person, which REBT calls illegitimate. REBT strongly uses humor to combat the irrational beliefs that clients take too seriously, but CBT sparingly makes use of this method. REBT goes deeper into disputing irrational thoughts than CBT by focusing on musts that cause the irrational beliefs. While REBT and CBT use many of the same cognitive methods, REBT also disputes irrational beliefs by having the therapist vigorously debate that client on their irrationality and teaching the client to do this to themselves as well. CBT focuses on practical problem solving while REBT first looks at the underlying emotional problem. REBT takes a greater focus on clients’ low frustration tolerance than does CBT. REBT, unlike CBT, also takes into account secondary symptoms of disturbances, i.e. feeling depressed for having anxiety, and how to eliminate them. REBT takes into consideration semantics and sentence restructuring that CBT does not.…

    • 738 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cognitive-Behavioral Theory (CBT) centers on the idea that the way an individual thinks influences their behaviors. Through utilizing the theory within the counseling relationship based on this idea, the counselor promotes positive change in the client by employing interventions and strategies aimed at altering both the thoughts and behaviors of the client to achieve wellness (Powers & Kalodner, 2016). In the video presented on Cognitive-Behavioral Theory (Psychotherapy.net, 1997), Diane Kjos, Ph.D. and Jon Carlson, PsyD begin by providing a brief description of the theory and then engage in a discussion with John Krumboltz, Ph.D. for further understanding of CBT. As an illustration of the application of the theory in the counseling process, a session is reviewed during which the counselor, Dr. Krumboltz, utilizes CBT to elicit positive change in the client, Robin. Once the…

    • 739 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Compare and contrast CBT and psychodynamic approaches to counselling focusing particularly on trauma and PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder): Theory and therapy.…

    • 2358 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    cognitive therapy

    • 451 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Cognitive behavioral therapy is a type of psychotherapeutic treatment that helps patients understand the thoughts and feelings that influence behaviors. This type of treatment is used to treat a wide range of disorders which include phobias, addiction, depression and anxiety. This type of treatment is generally short-term and focused on helping clients deal with a very specific problem. During the course of treatment, people learn how to identify and change destructive or disturbing thought patterns that have a negative influence on behavior.…

    • 451 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a generic umbrella term for a category of therapy approach that focus on the relationship between thoughts, feelings, and actions. There are many different types of CBT. Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (Ellis’s REBT) and Cognitive Therapy (Beck’s CT) are the two main types.…

    • 3081 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The theoretical orientation that best suites my personal style is a combination of both client-centered and brief therapy. In the first part of the paper, I try and describe the importance of developing a good client/therapist relationship using a client-centered approach. I like this approach the best because it helps the client to be more open and truthful with the therapist. There are several techniques that I find important in developing this bond such as: genuineness, unconditional positive regard, accurate empathy, and active listening. After building a relationship with the client, a therapist is now faced with identifying and solving a problem behavior. With this in mind, I found that the brief therapy method best fits my style. The great thing about this orientation is that it is a very directive and time efficient approach. This is because its theoretical constructs rely heavily on a cognitive-behavioral basis. In the last part of the paper I go into greater detail in describing what I like best about this therapy.…

    • 2220 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cognitive Interventions

    • 626 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Cognitive behavioral therapy, also known as CBT, emphasizes thinking how we feel and what we do (NACBT, 2007). CBT is based on emotional response. This is where the idea comes in that our thoughts drives how we feel and our behavior. There is an expected benefit with this. Since the idea that our thoughts drives our behaviors, if a person changes the way they think, then the behavior will change as well.…

    • 626 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays