The Role Of Abuse In Residential Schools

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September 11, 2014

"Residential Schools" Summary The Canadian government wanted to assimilate natives in by putting native children in residential schools. The Canadian government contacted churches to set up residential schools and provided them with funding, land and equipment. In 1884, the government passed the Indian Act, which made it mandatory for all native children under the age of 16 to attend residential schools. During the time between 1890 to 1970's, when residential schools were ended, between 100,000 and 150,000 people in Canada have attended them.

The children who went to residential schools were isolated from their families because they were not allowed to see their families for ten months in a year. The children were forced to practice Christian religion, speak English and learn more about Canadian culture and they were not allowed to talk about their own Indian culture. Abuse was a very serious concern at residential schools. The types of abuse includes physical, sexual and psychological. Today, as many as 12,000 cases of lawsuits against the Canadian government are being made by former students of residential schools.
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This high death rate is caused by very poor physical and sanitary situations at residential schools. There are also many cases of murders, death from escaping and freezing. The government knew about this problem, but decided not to do much about it. Residential schools have a great impact on native culture as it made many of them lose their own culture and gives them bad life experiences. The experience of physical and sexual abuse leaves many people with mental problems which lead to drug and alcohol addiction and serious mental sicknesses, which led to social

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