Preview

The Impact Of Environmental Justice: The Case Of Factory Farms?

Powerful Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1230 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
The Impact Of Environmental Justice: The Case Of Factory Farms?
Factory farms have large environmental implications. They are also a huge reason the animal rights movement even exists and especially why it is at the level it is today. Factory farms exist for a reason and have benefits to society. Agriculture has changed a lot over the years to increase production and efficiency, but production and efficiency are not necessarily achieved in ethical ways.
There is no question to whether agriculture is affecting the environment. The environment is bring greatly impacted by both animal and plants farms (Foley, J 2014). Foley suggests that growing human population numbers is demanding more and more food to be produced. To combat the impacts she states that developed nations need to shift their diet away from
…show more content…
Methane is a greenhouse gas, which holds heat in the environment and is commonly attributed to climate change. When huge numbers of these animals are packed together and farmed it has a big impact on the environment. Factory Farms have a wide spread impact, but the local environment receives the biggest impact. Those living around the farms are put at greater risk for developing health problems related to the waste generated by the farms, including increased respiratory difficulty, sore throat, chest tightness, nausea, and eye irritation (Nicole, W. 2013). In the article, “CAFOs and Environmental Justice: The Case of North Carolina”, Nicole makes an argument primarily on environmental justice for those who live directly around concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO). She delves into the social ecology of the issue which is the fact that the CAFOs are placed in poor areas with high minority populations. No one wants to live in areas that are consistently being contaminated by factory farms, but usually the people living in these areas were living on the land before the farms were put in place and cannot afford to leave. She uses a lot of quantitative facts as well specific examples from North Carolina communities to make her argument reputable. Her argument is entirely ethics based, but yet it is very different from Foley’s. Foley makes an ethical argument for the environment …show more content…
I consider myself an animal rights activist and associate myself most with Peter Singer’s Animal Liberation views. I believe the conditions that animals are subjected to are completely unacceptable, especially after looking at the environment impacts. While searching for reliable sources that are pro CAFOs, I found out that those are pretty much nonexistent. There are too many reasons that CAFO’s are not the right answer to feeding the growing population. In my opinion, we need more good examples of stewardship, like Peter Singer to work on moral extensionism; humans need to think about species that are not our own in order to make ethical decisions. Speciesism and the dominion thesis are the scourge of the animal rights movement and the environment. The dominion thesis allows people to think that we use the earth and other animals however we please. People do not realize this comes back and hurts our health. Pollution from CAFOs cannot be ignored. Our water quality is declining at an alarming rate. I believe that everyone, who is able, should consider a vegan lifestyle. Vegan lifestyles not only protest the unethical treatment of animals in factory farms, but also greatly benefit the environment, by requiring less pollution and greenhouses emitted to produce food and other

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    ON BUYIGN LOCAL SUMMARY

    • 1183 Words
    • 5 Pages

    There will always be environmental issues that exist, but the small steps can be taken in order to reduce them. There is so much more to farming than just the crops that are produced. Taking a look at some of the negative effects of large farms, many of them can be reduced. Burning fossil fuels releases many dangerous green house gases, which is causing the global warming phenomenon. Spriggs elaborates in her essay that the…

    • 1183 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Singer’s article criticizes factory farms for industrializing their farming practices and sacrificing good animal husbandry practices for increases in production. Singer indicates the ridiculous amount of animals affected by factory farm mistreatment by stating “[t]he use and abuse of animals raised for food far exceeds, in sheer numbers of animals affected, any other kind of mistreatment” (“Down on” 19). Singer evaluates the reasoning behind factory farmer’s unethical practices, and concludes that “farming is competitive and the methods adopted are those that cut costs and increase production” (“Down on” 20). By cutting costs and increasing production rates factory farming industry workers accumulate more wealth, and consumers are able consume more meat then physically necessary. One can evaluate this luxury the “Principle of Disproportionality” which states that “[a]ctions that meet nonbasic or luxury needs of humans are prohibited when they aggress against the basic needs of animals” (Sterba…

    • 530 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Animals Vs Vegetarianism

    • 1472 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The processed meat industry is an 800 billion dollar industry killing over 10 billion animals each in the United State alone. Factory farmed livestock account for over 99% of all the meat consumed by Americans even though they are raised in these despicable conditions. Many animals raised on factory farms live in abhorrent conditions where they are unable to turn around in their own cages, live in their own feces, and never even see the light of day.. Peter Singer dives into the idea that all animals are equal in a selection taken out of his book Animal Liberation, found in James and Stuart Rachels’ The Right Thing To Do, and advocates for the humane treatment of animals. Singer lays out the argument that it is morally wrong to make animals…

    • 1472 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    While driving past factory farms, anyone would assume that animals live a satisfying life style. At first sight, the animals look very robust and one would think that they have a healthy diet. Appearances can always be deceiving. What one observes while driving past these farms is not what factory farms actually are. Behind closed doors, many things go on that society would never expect. Every year, animals on factory farms encounter unimaginable suffering and go through horrid living conditions.…

    • 1223 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    According to the ASPCA, "a factory farm is a large, industrial operation that raises large numbers of animals for…

    • 770 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Since the change of the agricultural production, there has been both positive and negative effects, with regards to the environment and the economy. New technologies, government policies, increased chemical use and the mechanisation of the farming world have all favoured maximizing crop production. There have, however been some significant costs. Topsoil depletion, groundwater contamination, decline of family farms, increased costs of production and reduction of species diversity.…

    • 2341 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    This acquisition is false, the factory farmers do not get paid unless they are treating the animals with care. One of the reasons why someone pursues farming is because they have the desire to be with animals. According to David Leyonhjelm, the factory farms are more humane than the small scale farms. If the animals were not being treated with the proper care, then the animals would drop like flies. The livestock in the factory farms is protected from wind, snow, rain, heat and cold, and safe from the wild animals. Placing the animals in the factory farms allows the breeding process to be less stressful and the farmers will be able to take care and protect the young animals. While they are being protected in the warehouses, the animals are given a constant balanced diet and they are provided with plenty of fresh water. Factory farms are there to protect the livestock and still treat them with care while providing quality meat and dairy for the consumers. The last thing the factories want to do is cause the livestock discomfort, stress, and diseases. The factory farms are equipped with technology and farmers that can do everything they can to ensure they lead a stress and disease-free…

    • 1990 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Factory Farming

    • 612 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Animal rights are practically non-existent in many different ways today. Factory farming is probably the worst thing they can do to the poor helpless animals. Factory farming effects chickens, cows, pigs, and many other animals that are used for food, milk and eggs. One of the biggest organizations against factory farming is called Compassion Over Killing (COK). They go to great lengths to protest and inform people about animal cruelty.…

    • 612 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The article, “Vegetarian is the New Prius”, written by Kathy Freston, discusses the amount of contribution that livestock actively plays in the most crucial and serious environmental problem, from a local scale to global scale. Freston writes that the amount of livestock raised in United States soil is the main cause of air pollution, land degradation, water shortage, water pollution, biodiversity, and especially aids to global warming. This article attempts to convince readers to cut meat out of their diet and to become vegetarians, so that less livestock would be raised to feed the people and environmental issues would be cut down. Although it is true that Freston provides the audience with solid, legitimate factual arguments concerning the brutal slaughtering and consumption of livestock by humans, she fails to address the opposing argument. Although I am a personal fan of vegetarian foods, I disagree with Freston, primarily because my family has raised me on chicken and other meats. I believe that there will be livestock whether a lot of people change their diets and become vegetarians or not. At the University of Chicago, researches concluded that feeding animals for the production of meat, eggs, and dairy products requires growing upwards of ten times as many crops needed than if we just went without livestock. According to a report done by the United Nations animal agriculture takes up 70% of all agricultural land, and 30% of the total land surface of the planet. Upon seeing these disturbing facts, I do not believe that society will never 100% convert to a vegetarian lifestyle. Even if they do, there will still be millions of wild animals producing all of the same gases that are so harmful to our environment.…

    • 314 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Factory Farm

    • 1184 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Our society is showered with happy animals living on a farm where the cows graze in lush green fields and the chickens have the run of the barnyard. This free-roaming image of an animal living out their days in sunny fields is far from reality. A majority of the animals that are raised for food live miserable lives in confined, dark, overcrowded facilities, commonly called "factory farms."…

    • 1184 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    “This is horrible! I can’t even watch this!” Those were my immediate thoughts the first time my eyes were opened to the inhumane animal cruelty on factory farms. Factory farming enables mass production to supply the demands of today’s society but also enables the cruel treatment of animals. We need to end the cruelty and abuse that these animals have to endure at the factory farms because it causes loss to the business, reduces the quality of the product produced, and endangers the health of those who buy the product. We can promote humane treatment of factory farm animals by prevention through education, by enforcing humane laws by being an example of humane animal treatment, and by donating and/or volunteering at local humane law enforcement agencies.…

    • 1840 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Thesis: As stated by the “Food & Water Watch” Animals in Factory Farms are loaded with antibiotic-resistant bacteria, are mistreated and forced to live in unnatural, in humane, and unhealthy conditions, and the many communities that have to deal with air and water pollution caused by nearby Factory Farms.…

    • 940 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    One must first look at the issues at hand before seeking the solution that best fits everyone's and everything's best interests. First off, humans have developed something called "speciesism" (Singer And Mason 777), which is a prejudice against anything that is not a part of the dominant human race. Man has denied reasonable rights to animals and plants to prosper in a way that allows them to live their lives not as an object, but as a living thing. Such as it is in factory farming, animals are placed into cramped shelves and confined spaces with unhealthy environmental elements. This is not truly living by any means known to man. Humans know and understand this because they have the same interests as the animals do when it comes to living standards. Singer and Mason state, "If an animal feels pain, the pain matters as much as it does…

    • 1640 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    He believes that even if you give animals more space, natural environments, and more companions they still lack independent value. Factory farming violates animals rights but traditional agriculture is okay (Regan 679). Not only are these animals in this world, but they are aware of what is going on. Animals must have the same crucial moral rights.…

    • 1196 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In "The Case for Animal Rights," Tom Regan writes about his beliefs regarding animal rights. Regan states the animal rights movement is committed to a number of goals, including: "the total abolition of the use of animals in science; the total dissolution of commercial animal agriculture; and the total elimination of commercial and sport hunting and trapping. Regan goes on and tells us the "fundamental wrong is the system that allows us to view animals as our resources, here for us--to be eaten, or surgically manipulated, or exploited for sport or money." Once people accept this view of animals being here for our resources, they believe what harms the animal doesn't really matter. Regan explains that in order to have this changed, people must change their beliefs. If enough people, especially people that hold a public office, change their beliefs, there can be laws made to protect the rights of animals.…

    • 684 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays