Top-Rated Free Essay
Preview

The Help-Racism

Good Essays
425 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
The Help-Racism
Introduction Martin Luther King once said “I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality.... I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word.” This particular quote is a great way to describe what Kathryn Stockett is trying to portray in her book titled “The Help.” In Stockett’s novel, the author demonstrates that racism divides with negative consequences through the setting, conflicts and characters.

BODY 1 Stockett’s novel is set in 1962 in a town called Jackson, Mississippi. In 1962, Mississippi was not a state where white and coloured people were equal. In Jackson there was a distinct line of where people lived, on one side in grand, luxurious homes live the white people and on the other side are smaller, rougher homes where the coloured people lived. Everything in Jackson, Mississippi was divided libraries, schools even hospitals. These places were divided because some of the white people believed “they carry different kinds of diseases than we do.” (Stockett 8) This statement clearly shows how divided Jackson, Mississippi must have been in 1962 the fact the white people thought that coloured people carried different diseases then they do would have been a prime way they we would have been separated. Miss. Skeeter is a white woman from Jackson, Mississippi, friends with all the white ladies and Abilieen is a coloured woman, and a maid for Miss. Skeeter’s best friend. When Miss. Skeeter decides to interview Abilieen on a book she is writing from the point of view of the help Miss. Skeeter decides that they will meet up at Abilieen’s in the coloured part of town. Miss. Skeeter parks 2 blocks from Abilieen’s house and when Miss. Skeeter is over at her house Abilieen realizes she has never had a white woman in her house. Having a white woman in a coloured woman’s house would cause all kinds of conflict if anyone were to find out.
2nd Body In Stockett’s novel the biggest conflict is the division between coloured and white people, this conflict causes many little conflicts for example: separate washrooms for white people and the help, which are coloured. Mrs. Hilly is a leading example of conflicts; she is the ultimate top white woman in Jackson. Mrs. Hilly is the person who started the “Home Help Sanitation Initiative” (Stockett 60) which is a fancy way of saying an extra washroom for the coloured help.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    It was reflected in the past and present, from discriminating against skin color, how they look, being uneducated, etc. In the “Coming of Age In Mississippi” skin color is an issue that African Americans deal with and racism inside their own community. For example, Raymond’s mother, a mullato doesn’t necessarily care for Anne Moody’s mother because she is dark-skinned and when Anne Moody was considering applying to Tougaloo College although her roommate informs her that you need to be light-skinned and rich to attend, she immediately refused that decision. This internalized racism affects Anne Moody’s identity because she didn’t consider herself having the privilege the lighter skinned African Americans had because she is dark skinned, she puts herself down and questions well if I wasn’t dark-skinned, maybe I would be able to have the joy in doing things my own race could do. The article, “Skin Tone and Stratification in the Black Community” by Verna M. Keith and Cedric Herring discusses the difference in skin tone in the black community and how it makes a difference in the opportunities given in society. The article states, “ Fair-skinned blacks had higher levels of attainment than darker blacks on virtually every dimension of stratification. During the 1960s, however, blacks experienced unprecedented social and economic progress. Racial differences in…

    • 2507 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The book began in a child’s point of view, perfectly told, of growing up in rural Mississippi in the 1940s. She described the landscape, the people, and her own emotions with perfect clarity. While showing racism from the perspective of a child, she included her parents’ divorce following the constant moving of her family due to the fact that her mother struggled to feed the family on her own.…

    • 2029 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    One of the main characters, Denver Moore, is black. Ron Hall and most of the other characters are white. The interactions between Denver and other characters provide insight into how blacks were treated at this time in America, even if race was not specifically talked about in the book. Denver and his family were sharecroppers. It was referred to as modern day slavery because they were so in debt they did not have freedom anymore. Most of the black people mentioned in this book were illiterate. As a result, any part of the book written by Denver did not have proper grammar. Ron Hall’s writing, however, was perfect. This shows the difference in their upbringing. They both started out poor, but Ron was able to move beyond his debt, while Denver was caught in one big trap. Denver did not have the best relationship with white people when he was younger. The only white person he liked was this boy his age, but Denver ended up being moved to a new farm. All the stories Denver was told and experienced about white people involved violence. Some white schoolboys did not like the black schoolboys walking on the same path as them, even though it was a later time. They ambushed the black schoolboys with sticks and old pieces of wood. When Denver was a teenager, he saw a white woman who was having car problems. Denver offered to help, but some white boys drove by and decided that Denver…

    • 1182 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    As she entered the local supermarket, everyone’s actions came to a standstill. They all watched her as she walked down the aisle minding her own business. Their eyes pierced into her dark flesh, discovering the humility that the woman felt as they watched every single one of her moves. The humiliation that she experienced caused her to question how one’s mind could be so immoral to the point where they discriminate people from society because of their skin color. She perpetually wondered what it would be like to be born a different skin color. It was challenging for the young woman to be a part of society without feeling discriminated by others. She longed for the time where color would not create a rift in society and instead would unite people…

    • 1551 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Help Racism

    • 1926 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Stockett's novel alternates between the different perspectives of Abileen, Minny, and Skeeter, in which Skeeter's chapters outnumber both characters. In a book that supposedly creates a voice for mistreated African Americans during the sixties, Donaldson states that the novel has too much of an emphasis on Skeeter and how her actions combat inequality. In addition, the chapters narrated by Skeeter contain proper, grammatical English, with no spelling errors. Contrastingly, Abileen and Minny's chapters are written with an overemphasized dialect, also filled with improper grammar and misspelled words. Thus, Donaldson claims, "Stockett's wildly popular novel quite simply appropriates an African American story and turns it into one of white guilt, redemption, reconciliation, and triumph..." (Donaldson 38). Donaldson's thoughts are not unfounded, as the behaviors of white people are insulted, then given numerous opportunities to correct their mistakes, forgiven, and somewhat accepted by African Americans. However, ultimately through the use of multiple perspectives, including Skeeter's, Stockett is effectively able to create insight on each individual's experiences with southern racism and inequality. Abileen's perspective, reveals that African Americans have become unwilling to fight back due to repetitive and…

    • 1926 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    In the beginning of the film, Elizabeth, Skeeter’s friend, is having a clique of girls over for a bridge club. Aibileen, Elizabeth’s maid, is serving the girls and preparing meals in the kitchen while Hilly, the cruelest and most racist of the bunch, starts to talk disrespectfully about the “blacks” living in town. Aibileen hears this and is disgusted, but she knows in order to keep her job, she must stay quiet about it so she continues working. Skeeter is with the girls who were talking bad about blacks and finds it offensive that they would talk like that, so she gets up and walks into the kitchen to apologize to Aibileen. Skeeter shows remorse and expresses her regrets that Aibileen must listen to that. This scene expresses Skeeter’s moral views on social discrimination in Jackson because she takes the time to apologize to Aibileen for something she did not even partake in. Skeeter’s general disgust with the morality of the situation also shows off her disapproval of the discrimination being flaunted around town. Another example of a time when Skeeter exploited her distaste of the morality of the discrimination in Jackson was when she carried through a plan to compile stories of black maids that would expose their treatment. After she witnessed Hilly’s…

    • 1598 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The first thought that comes to mind when talking about racism is the separation of two races based on skin tone. “In 1960, when a six-year-old girl enrolled in a white school in New Orleans, parents withdrew their white children in her class. She was the only child in her classroom for over a year.”(Baughman et. al.). In the 1960s, African Americans were mistreated in the US, mostly in the south. Kathryn Stockett, the author, assumed that society wouldn’t be as understanding in her writing The Help, because many wouldn’t clasp the fact that the nation was discriminating.(Stockett). For her, though, it was convenient to write about the other side of the situation in this era. “I don’t have to think about the dialect. It wasn’t hard for me to get that musicality on the page because I started writing the voice of Demeitre and she sounded exactly the way I wrote her.”(Stockett). Growing up, she had an African American maid,Demeitre, in which she got close with, and being accustomed to her always being around, it later got her to write Aibileen’s parts in the…

    • 248 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Divine Wind - Racism

    • 560 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Divine Wind describes an Australia that is tarnished by racism, hatred and distrust, and yet the novel ends on an optimistic note. Do you agree?…

    • 560 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jackson, Mississippi is widely known as one of the most racist areas in America. The Help, directed by Tate Taylor, is set in 1964 Jackson, Mississippi and is based on the segregation and racism towards the African American maids in America. An idea in The Help that I thought was interesting was racism. I thought this was interesting because of how different it is to today’s society with the laws against racial discrimination. Taylor portrayed the idea of racism through the use of film techniques and dialogue.…

    • 831 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The first example of discrimination which causes a huge problem is the discussion of race. Even though the book is written based in the nineties, it was still looked at as frowned upon to be in an interracial relationship. One day while the author was jogging through the park he noticed a very dark black man and a blonde woman jogging with a little terrier. He noticed that when the man turned the corner the first the day he peered behind him at the woman. The next day however he noticed the woman running in front of him and the man, already had passed the turn, again looked back at the woman. He sees these two people everywhere and wonders why they just cannot be together. He discusses it with his friend Joe Odem who tells him, “We don’t do black-on-white in Savannah…especially black male on white female,” (Berendt 55). Joe goes on to tell him that “A lot of things have changed over the past 20 years, but not that”( Berendt 55). However this is not the first time the author faces the harsh discrimination against African Americans in Savannah. Throughout the novel, the author attends these parties where the whole help staff is African American, from the caterer to the waiters and waitresses. There was one woman in particular, Lucille Wright. She was a light-skinned black woman who was known as one of Savannah’s leading hostesses who had catered several events for the rich people of…

    • 854 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “Let’s stop believing that our differences make us superior or inferior to one another”- Don Miguel Ruiz. The novel “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett is a controversial and heart-wrenching story that depicts the cruel brutality and inequality that African Americans faced in Jackson, Mississippi during the early 1960’s. In the novel, Stockett shows the inequality between races, how Caucasian Americans believed they were superior, and the bigotry between social classes through the characterization of the main characters and bringing forth facts from that time setting. These issues have changed over the years but are yet still here in a more subtle way.…

    • 102 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Martin Luther King Jr. also appeals to the readers' pathos throughout his letter as an attempt to convince them about the immoral nature of segregation. MLK uses examples of segregation in society and how it negatively affects the people who are subjected to injustice. His story about the girl who can't go to Funtown because it is closed to colored children closes with the line, "Daddy, why do white people treat colored people so mean?" invokes a great deal of sadness from the reader. (p265 ¶14) The reader can't help but pity the poor little…

    • 668 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    At the start of the book a naïve, young and innocent African American girl lived life almost oblivious to the socially constructed issue of race. She did not see the difference of skin color and believed it was perfectly normal to socialize with whites. As far as she was concerned raced did not exist. This view was quickly altered and changed as the little girl named Essie-Mae Moody grew up fast in a society dominated by racial boundaries involving whites, blacks and a hierarchy of people who had parts of both. Essie’s first encounter with race which initiated her first change, from being oblivious to being confused, occurred early in life. When she was young, she was friends with and often played with white children. This all changed when an unknowing Essie-Mae tried to sit with her white friends in a white’s only section of a movie theatre. After being harshly corrected of her errors by her mother her eyes were opened for the first time to a world with race. “I knew that we were going to separate schools and all, but I never knew why.”1 At this point her innocence was lost and confusion took hold of her. At this point she realized the bigger picture, that she and her friends were different because of their skin color.…

    • 1283 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    According to a 2008 Gallup poll, most African Americans residing in America strongly believe racism is still a major factor embedded in their lives. Racism is defined as prejudice or discrimination directed against individuals of a different race based on such a belief. Though racism is not extinct and plays a role in today’s society, it was much more severe and widely accepted during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's. Anne Moody's book, Coming of Age in Mississippi, and Tate Taylor's film, The Help, based on the book written by Kathryn Stockett's, are both novels that expose the severity of racism and prejudice during the Civil Rights Movement. Though both novels take place during the same time period,…

    • 1769 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The setting of the novel is tremendously spiteful because these events occurred a short time ago. The white community had tremendous power they had obtained in the later 1800 and 1900s. They saw themselves as the superior race; they controlled everything. They abused power to the point where blacks lost their lives. The Help portrays a dark history of America which is extremely unpleasant due to the placing and the era it occurred. Leaders of the past centuries have paced a path for use; whish allows us to learn from their mistakes and also be weary of the abusing power. Standing up for your beliefs and freedom can be a hard thing to do; it can lead to harsh consequences. Dr Marti Luther King Jnr is seen as a hero in the black community because he stood up for what he believed in even though he was murdered for his beliefs; he also earned respect and dignity. Kathryn Stockett gives us a glimpse of the 1960’s Mississippian world and how inhumane whites were towards not only blacks but also women. This allows viewers to reflect and try and avoid the same mistakes occurring in their community. Viewers also learn a valuable lesson because it allows them to have a different perspective towards their community; also allow the viewers to try and limit the extent of discrimination and prejudice arising in their community. The Help can be viewed as a message that we should never forget mistakes of our…

    • 1770 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays