Preview

The Haymakers

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1114 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
The Haymakers
Minnesota's history is littered with tales of hardship and struggles for survival. When the going gets tough, the tough get going. But where do the tough live…in the great hay-making state of Minnesota. Weather, sorrow, and physical labor all contribute to the struggle of life on the farm. Each account of life on the farm is blanketed with pride, without ever mentioning the word. "Make hay while the sun shines." (pg.9) Dark clouds are always just beyond the horizon. Every family moved to Minnesota with one common goal in mind. This goal was to have a home, a family, and a farm. Life on the farm was not easy; if Andrew Peterson was still living, he would attest to that. Peterson was a man of religion and land. He emigrated to the United States of America from Sweden; who came here with nothing but a dream and a prayer. After five years of life as a hired hand in Iowa, Peterson was given the opportunity to purchase land in Carver County, Minnesota. The land he purchased was nothing but Mother Nature's most beautiful green. Unbeknownst to Peterson, it would take him 20 years to carve out the farm land he desired. How daunting this seems, as his tools were elbow grease, an axe, and a scythe. Peterson had a lot of work to do and a small time frame to do it in. Haying was not his cash crop but he needed it to feed the team of oxen, which in time was replaced by horses, then by modern day tractor. Most of his labor was expended on haying rather than his wheat and apple crops. War was on the horizon, in more than one direction. On one end of the spectrum civil war had broken out between the north and the south over the issue of slavery. Not having a strong opinion and wanting to continue to farm his land had Peterson indifferent to the situation. On the other end of the spectrum, Dakota Indians where outraged by how the American government was treating them. This issue was concerning to Peterson because it was on his back door and not going away. Peterson and the


References: Hoffbeck, Steven R. The Haymakers; A Chronicle of Five Farm Familes. St. Paul: Minnesota Historical Society, 2000.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    The conflict they faced was over land. In order solve this issue “treaties set aside a reservation for the Dakota, 10 miles on either side of the Minnesota River, stretching for 150 miles. A skinny strip in the middle of the vast territory the Dakota were giving up. They didn't have much choice.” Henry Sibley was the first Governor of the U.S state of Minnesota and…

    • 308 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Chapter two “The Farmer” Pollan meets with an Iowa native and lifelong farmer, George Naylor. The two spend their time planting corn on 160 acres of Naylor’s farm. In an eye opening interview seeded with history the two…

    • 1001 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Each and every one of us has a dream and we all encounter conflicts that stand in the way of our ability to achieve it. Some people can reach their dreams, but many find themselves unable to free themselves from the personal, social and economic chains that bind them. In Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men, Lennie and George had a dream of owning a farm. These characters embarked on a journey to achieve their version of the American dream. “Well,” said George, “we’ll have a big vegetable patch and a rabbit hutch and chickens. And when it rains in the winter, we’ll just say the hell with goin’ to work, and we’ll build up a fire in the stove and set around it an’ listen to the rain comin’ down on the roof—Nuts!” Along the way, their personal, social and economic limitations put insurmountable hardships in their path.…

    • 1160 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ffn Q and a

    • 1854 Words
    • 8 Pages

    16. How have the myth of the cowboy and the image of the hard-working rancher become irrelevant in today’s rural culture?…

    • 1854 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the book, Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder, Paul Farmer made and continues to make a profound difference in the world. He was extremely successful because of the help he received from people who surrounded him. Partners In Health (PIH), Farmer’s organization, gives healthcare to people who cannot afford it and treatment to those with tuberculosis and AIDS. Although he was a founding advocate to the success of Partners In Health, Farmer would not have accomplished all that he did without the aid from others. Usually, it takes a group of people with the same goals in order to make a change in the world. Not everyone in the world can drop his/her entire life and put as much effort into saving the world as Paul Farmer did. However, he had many dedicated people who helped him. Without Ophelia Dahl, Tom White, and Jim Yong Kim, Paul Farmer would not have been nearly as successful as he is today.…

    • 814 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    In OMM, the Dream of land ownership reflects the importance of hope in helping individuals overcome times of adversities in the 1930’s. It was the Great Depression and fuelled by the Californian Dustbowl conditions, poverty rates rose and people were continuously displaced in search for work. To George and Lennie, the protagonists of the novella, the agrarian Dream serves as a direction in life as well as a hope of stable, peaceful life. Through emotive language, Steinbeck creates a sense of belonging in George’s description of the future farm, ‘we’d jus’ live there,’ ‘we’d belong there’. The accumulating descriptive language of the little farm including the ‘smoke house’ for the ‘bacon and the hams’ and the…

    • 1435 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Harvet Gypsies

    • 1731 Words
    • 7 Pages

    A major drought, over-cultivation, and a country suffering from one of the greatest depressions in history are all it took to displace hundreds of thousands of Midwesterners and send them, and everything they had, out west. The Dust Bowl ruined crops all across the Great Plains region, crops that people depended on for survival. When no food could be grown and no money could be made, entire families, sometimes up to 8 people or more, packed up everything they had and began the journey to California, where it was rumored that jobs were in full supply. Without even closing the door behind them in some cases, these families left farms that had been with them for generations, only to end up in a foreign place where they were neither welcomed nor needed in great quantity. This would cause immense problems for their futures. It is these problems that author John Steinbeck spent a great deal of his time studying and documenting so that Americans could better understand the plight of these migrant farmers, otherwise known as “Okies.” From touring many of these “Hoovervilles” and “Little Oklahomas” (pg. v) Steinbeck was given a firsthand look at the issues and hardships these migrant workers faced on a daily basis. With the help of Tom Collins, manager of a federal migrant labor camp, Steinbeck began a “personal and literary journey” (pg. v), revealing to the world the painful truth of these “Okies” in his book Harvest Gypsies.…

    • 1731 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Symbolism - "My Antonia"

    • 556 Words
    • 3 Pages

    “In all that country it was the spot most dear to me” because when all of the land has been cleared for farming, this “island” where two roads meet is the only place where the tall prairie grass still grows undisturbed” (62).…

    • 556 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Osmosis Case Study

    • 1449 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Times were difficult in Habersham County. The skyrocketing prices of fuel and food were threatening to bankrupt the Johnson family’s small farm, which was no match for the multi-million-dollar mega-farms that had been popping up all over the southeast. Joseph, the family patriarch, was especially troubled by the farm’s financial circumstances. He knew that this year’s corn crop was his best chance to save the farm, and his distress was evident to his family as they sat around the dinner table.…

    • 1449 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Dakota War

    • 1363 Words
    • 6 Pages

    It is not well known that Minnesota was simultaneously caught up in two civil wars during the 1860s. Even while contributing to the Union forces battling the Confederacy, Minnesota was also fighting an intense conflict between white settlers and the Dakota people. Newly ratified as a state, Minnesota’s local government made treaties with Native American tribes offering to buy their land. As the civil war progressed with Minnesota sending hundreds of men to battle, tension with the Dakota tribes increased. The Dakota War of 1862 played a large part on Minnesota’s history, killing over one thousand white settlers, soldiers and Dakota people, impacting the history of Minnesota forever.…

    • 1363 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Painted Door

    • 528 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Ann and her husband John lived on a farm in rural Saskatchewan in the 1800’s. The couple were living in a largely uninhabited and desolate area of Saskatchewan. It was vast and bleak a wilderness that testifies of human hardihood and endurance. The barrenness of the surroundings in which Anne and John lived was almost unbearable, isolation and loneliness. The prairies of Saskatchewan are covered with snow with blue sky during winter.…

    • 528 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Sanders and Rushdie Paper

    • 597 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Sanders explains how the very core of society is on the belief that “our promised land has always been over the next ridge or at the end of the trail, never under our feet.” (6-8). He uses historical anecdotes to show that the human race has always had “restless movers” and that “this nation is comprised of those restless movers.” (2-3). He reminds us the Spaniards devastated Central and South America because of their desire to discover new lands and conquer them. Sanders shows us that the Dust Bowl was caused by farmers bringing crops that were not suitable for the terrain. He compares the need to move and society’s worst fate to be “in some dead-end job or unglamorous marriage of played-out game” (15-17). Sanders explains that human are trained to believe that if they should “stand still, you die” (17). He shows us in this quote how society views resting in one place for too long.…

    • 597 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Daily Struggle of Farmers What is a profile essay? A profile aims to inform the audience about a specific person, place, or event that might otherwise be unknown to them. This type of essay provides vivid, interesting descriptions of facts pertaining to the subject.…

    • 603 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    What gift is given to the animals for their victory? -- One apple, two ounces of corn for each bird and three biscuits for each dog.…

    • 472 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Jessica Hemauer wrote a autobiographical essay titled, “Farm Girl.” She wrote about her life growing up on her parents farm. She had to work long hours milking and feeding the cows, while her friends were able to play sports, watch tv, or do whatever they wanted to. Growing up on her parents farm taught her to be responsible and mature for her age.…

    • 441 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays