The Gods In Flannery O Connor's The Elders

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In a world scattered under petty and small warring kingdoms, four powerful magicians calling themselves The Elders, forming The Elders Council that rules over the barren northern lands, inhabited by nothing but wild life, doing nothing but spending their time studying elemental magic, these magicians claimed their power by tapping into a raw source of magical energy an elemental stone, each Elder had an element or two that corresponds its stone, these magicians blunty put are,immortals with immense magical prowess

A cloaked man walking swiftly through a narrow and empty corridor, leading to a large gate which appears to be carved out of marble, the same individual stops as he lowers his hood, thus revealing his face and his staff from under his cloak, he raises the staff which in turn it emits light, the same light begins to radiate from within cracks of the marble gate, slowly opening as it reveals a great oval table with four seats spread apart, three of these seats were occupied by hooded men which share the same slim physique,
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"You are late again Jorge, your tardiness is unacceptable for an Elder" Said a man donning an all white robe, befitting his pale skin colour and grey hair.
"I'm sorry Elder Anior, but I had to interfere to stop the war between the Seakar Kingdom and the Oskiris Dynasty" said Jorge with an honest look on his face.
"There's nothing to gain by interfering with petty wars humans wage on one another, I'll never understand your compassion towards these feeble pests." Said Anior with his typical dissatisfied facial expression.
"I'm sorry for the delay Elder Yewyn and Elder Higeor, now I can begin explaining the reason for this assembly" said Anior with a wicked smug on his

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