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Summary Of Bordin's Psychodynamic Theory

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Summary Of Bordin's Psychodynamic Theory
The concept of establishing a relationship between the therapist and client traces back to psychoanalytic theory written by Freud (1912). He believed in encouraging positive transference to help patients achieve self-awareness and thus maintain the motivation to continue collaborating with the therapist (Corey, 2005). More famously known for his theory on emphasizing the importance of developing a trusting relationship between the therapist and client is Carl Rogers. Rogers (1957) believed that the ability of clients to change during the process of therapy depends largely on the quality of the alliance between therapist and client. One of the six essential conditions that Rogers found must be present before change occurs is that a therapeutic …show more content…
Bordin (1979) presented three features considered to be essential to the development of a therapeutic alliance: agreement on therapy goals, assignment of tasks in therapy, and the development of therapist-client bond. The goals component represents mutually agreed upon stressors that has affected clients and the understanding that these problems occur as a result of the way clients think, feel and act. Thus, therapy aims at alleviating these pains. Bordin believed that the way goals are developed in therapy vary according to each therapist’s theoretical orientation. The assignment of tasks in therapy is a collaboration between therapist and patient on approaching a treatment. These include determining a contract and negotiation of fees. Both parties will also discuss the ongoing therapeutic process to reach a mutual understanding. Bordin believed that the success of tasks will depend ultimately on the therapist’s understanding of the client’s difficulties. When a therapist is able to connect tasks with current issues, then positive outcomes will prevail throughout therapy sessions. The therapist must have an in-depth understanding of the client’s world to effectively employ interventions that will help clients achieve their

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