Crisis Criteria Or Trauma Evaluation

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Crisis Criteria/Trauma
8. Crisis/Trauma Evaluation:
Initial focus will be directed to assessing suicidal ideation, intent, and plan as a result of client’s recent psychiatric hospitalization. When discussing the impact of sexual abuse, it is difficult to identify what treatment will work efficiently given that “a number of factors appear to be associated with increased distress for survivors, which include molestation at an early age, frequency of abuse, incest by a biological parent, or the presence of force” (Briere & Elliot,1994, p. 63). Given the client’s symptoms and disclosure of abuse, it appears that he did not adequately process the trauma consequently creating an internal system in which the client “alternates between denial and
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Therapeutic alliance:
Following main concepts from Alfred Adler’s theory, the goal of my therapeutic alliance with my client (and all clients for that matter) will derive from a foundation that “affirms that humans are not determined by heredity or environment, rather, they are creative, proactive, meaning-making beings, with the ability to choose and to be responsible for their choices” (Watts, 2014, p.2). In building such alliance, communicating to the client a sense of “control, connection, meaning, and a sense of worth and belonging” (Millar, 2013, p. 246) will enhance rapport. Although client’s depressive mood is causing irritability, negative self-talk, and isolating behaviors, to some extent, it “serves as a useful purpose and the focus of counseling is to help the client find that purpose in a more personally and socially beneficial way” (McBrien, 1985, p. 473). As the client’s symptoms have infiltrated various domains of functioning it will be critical to “not simply change his perspective on the presenting problem, but his view about himself and the world causing change in the client’s early recollections” (Carlson, Watts, & Maniacci, 2006, p. 131).
16. Process of treatment (Beginning/Middle/End

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