Solidarity of Emotion Towards Fulfilled Solitude

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Elias John Kukas Socio 10 Final Integration Paper
BSBAA 3 October 15, 2007

Solidarity of Emotion towards fulfilled Solitude

INTRODUCTION “A wonderful reflection existing in alternative nature about the queries of self about his/her being and everyone in its society; whether the truth resides on this option or in the conventional justifications is not a big deal.” In those thirty-eight words without any consciousness that it must fit in that form, I describe Sociology as a field of study and exploration. For the past five months I have been studying introductory sociology as a general education course, I felt more of a philosophy course than a usual observational and empirical science. Nonetheless, it could be argued that as philosophy of sound reasoning give rise to different scientific pursues, so does beginners sociology scopes the philosophical articulations of its recognized fathers. Based on the perspective of my constructed description, I will try to discuss those thoughts I have learned in this course.
Revealing Reflection According to Ernest Geller (taken from the essay of Josephine Dionisio), Nation states that emerges especially in industrial Europe came into being not because of human nature or essential characteristics common to a group of people but for the reason of the need for new set of skills and proficiencies that can only be thought in a large scale and homogeneous mode. Simply the complexity of the ways of production and division of labor makes the nation a sensible concept. This statement really makes sense at least to me yet I never



References: David, Randolf. Nation, Self and Citizenship: An Invitation to Philippine Sociology. Philippines: Anvil. 2004 Berger, Peter. Invitation to Sociology: A Humanistic Perspective. Middlesex, England: Penguin Books 6

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