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Sociology of Mental Illness Paper Assignment

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Sociology of Mental Illness Paper Assignment
Kasmine Sinclair
April 26, 2015
Medical Sociology (SOC 3700)
Dr. Jonniann Butterfield
The Sociology of Mental Illness
Media Analysis Paper on Girl Interrupted

Part A – Theoretical Framework
Describe the major components of the Sociological Model of Mental Illness and compare it to the Medical Model of Mental Illness. What evidence exists that supports the Sociological Model of Mental Illness? What evidence exists that supports the Medical Model of Mental Illness? (Approximately 2-4 paragraphs) Even though most of the Sociological Model of Mental Illness is concerned with factors in the social structure such as: social class, age, race, and gender contribute to the rate of mental disorder, there has been a lot of research regarding the branding concerns of mental illness as a social status. The research is essentially motivated by the collection of concepts known as the labeling theory. Within the concepts, theoretical and experimental develops in the sociological understanding of dishonor connected with mental illness. Furthermore, the concepts shows how sociologists have contributed to our understanding of public conceptions of mental illness and public reactions to mental illness. There has been a lot of progress and prospects in research on the effects of stigma on people with mental illness. There are three major components of the Sociological Model of Mental Illness: Stress Theory, Structural Strain Theory, and the Labeling Theory. The Medical Model of Mental Illness is the approach to the diagnosis and treatment of illness. The main focus is using a problem solving technique that is concerned with defect or dysfunction. The Medical Model of Mental Illness is based on physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual dimensions that perceives the individual. Comparing the Sociological and Medical Model of Mental Illness, the Medical Model for mental illness totally eliminate the social causes, allowing government and society to avoid its responsibility.

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