Sex Selection Essay

Better Essays
Mirtha A. Maddox
The Research Essay Project
Ethical Issues in the Biomedical Sciences
Dr. Sean Erwin
Spring B 2012

Abstract
Choosing the sex of your child is technically possible thanks to advances in fertility treatments that allow doctors to create or identify embryos of a certain sex based on this most accurate sex selection methods; usually the most expensive (10,000.00) often involving invasive infertility treatments and fertility drugs with side effects. Sex determination and the selective abortion of fetuses are widespread in some countries including the United States. This new technology has immense potential to allow parents to avoid genetically oriented problems but its use has had the effect of making it relatively easy for parents to opt for abortion as a means of sex selection when the parents did not wish to have a child of particular sex. In an article posted by LifeNews.com shows that on 02/16/2012 the U.S. committee approved a legislation that would ban sex selection or raced based abortions. Congressman Trent Franks, from Arizona Republican and who is a member of the House Judiciary Committee has brought back the Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act. This law will prohibit abortions performed on the basis of the child’s sex or race. There are many different points of views regarding this issue but despite to that the technology about sex selection continues develop more and more regardless the laws and rules that may prohibit the practice of it.

1. Description of the issue, some history given behind its development.
According to an article on the Shared Journey, Your Path to Fertility, the website mentioned that gender selection has actually been around for centuries; in fact, methods of sex selection were recorded in hieroglyphics by the Ancient Egyptians. In the past, sex selection has relied on certain sexual positions, timing, or special foods eaten during pregnancy. But these methods are based on little or no scientific



References: Schafer, S. (2004, February 1). Science: brave new babies. The daily beast. Retrieved from http://www.thedailybeast.com Leigh, S. (n.d.). Choosing your baby’s sex. Retrieved from http://www.babycenter.com Ertelt, S. (2012, February 17). House panel oks bill to ban sex selection. Retrieved from http://LifeNews.com Retrieved from www.sharedjourned.com/

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