Roles of Special Interest Groups

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Roles of Special Interest Groups
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October 13, 2014
Roger Long

Roles of Special Interest Groups
Today women have more rights than they have ever had, but it came at a price. Over 40 years ago a case brought before the U.S. Supreme Court laid the foundation for women who wanted to have a choice, this choice was abortion. The famous case Roe v. Wade paved the path for women all over the United States to make their choice in the matter of pregnancy. However, there have been several activist groups that feel no matter what this is wrong, these groups result to violence that have been said to be a form a domestic terrorism. In 2003, Norma McCorvy, know has Jane Roe in the Supreme Court case Roe v. Wade, changed her outlook on abortion, her motion was denied. In 2007, the Federal law was passed banning certain abortion procedures. This again takes the decision out of the hands of women and forces some to have unsafe procedures, which can lead to never being able to have children or even death. It was not until 2007 that the first ever-Federal law was passed banning certain abortion procedures. The U.S. Supreme Court allowed politicians the ability to choose the fate of women and families. The law criminalizes any abortion in the second trimester; the thought was it was too dangerous for women. This contradicts the over 30-year law that stated a women's health came first. Trent Franks, an Arizona Representative has been pushing this bill to make it nation wide. This law takes the ability to make a decision for personal or medical reasons out of the hands of women, even if her doctor has reason to believe it is in her best interest ("Planned Parenthood", 2014). One of the most remembered cases that change abortion in America was Roe v. Wade. In 1971 Norma McCorvy, who was known to the court as Jane Roe, filed a case against Henry Wade. He was the district attorney who enforced a law that prohibited abortion, except to save the



References: Anti-Defamation League. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.adl.org/combating-hate/domestic-extremism-terrorism/c/anti-abortion-violence-americas-forgotten-terrorism-1.html Cockrill, K., & Weitz, T.A. (2010, January-February). Abortion Patients ' Perceptions of Abortion Regulation. Women 's Health Issues, 20(1), 12-19. Cornell University Law School. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/planned_parenthood_of_southeastern_pennsylvania_v._casey_1992 CNN. (2014). CNN. Retrieved from http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/04/us/roe-v-wade-fast-facts/ Culwell, K.R., & Hurwitz, M.D. (2013, May). Addressing Barriers to Safe Abortions. International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 121(1), S16-S19. Kliff, S. (2014). Vox. Retrieved from http://www.vox.com/2014/6/26/5845590/buffer-zones Planned Parenthood. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.plannedparenthoodaction.org/issues/abortion-access/federal-and-state-bans-and-restrictions-on-abortion/

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