Radiation

Good Essays
Radioactivity computer research: Instructions and Questions
[Note: Links to Bitesize websites may direct you to a ‘home’ page for Radiation and the Universe- click ‘Activity’ for Radioactive Substances and scroll through until you find the appropriate page]
1) Go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/aqa/radiation/radiocativerev1.shtml . What is an isotope? How many isotopes of hydrogen are there?
An isotope is an atoms which are from the same element but have different numbers of neutrons. Hydrogen has three isotopes.
2) Use the Bitesize pages and the ‘Y10 radioactivity’ file (especially the ‘types of radiation’ animation and videos in the ‘Radiation types- range and stopping’ file) to complete the following table:
3) (NB: Don’t worry about the ‘inverse square law’ bit about gamma radiation, this simply states that when the distance from the source is doubled, the count rate decreases by more than half (this is known as the ‘inverse square’ law).

Radiation type
Made of
Charge
Mass
Stopped by
Alpha
2 protons
2 neutrons
+2
Large
Paper
Beta
Electron formed with neutron inside
-1
Small
Aluminum
Gamma
Electromagnetic wave
0
Tiny
Lead

4) Open folder ‘ionisation’ and watch the video. Look closely at the particles emitted by the source at the end of the animation - what type of emission is this? Explain how these particles can cause an electric current to travel through air.
An electron will be taken from the surface which is attracted to the positive plate whereas the ironized particle is attracted to the negative plate which then drifts sideways. The electrons got one way and the ionized air goes the other way helping the current to flow.
5) Open folder ‘detecting radiation’. Draw a diagram in your book showing how the Geiger-Muller tube detects radioactive emissions for a count-rate to be established.
6) Open the ‘Geiger Muller Tube.exe’ folder and have a go at setting up a Geiger-Muller tube that is connected

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    Chemistry Assighnment

    • 470 Words
    • 2 Pages

    1. Create and complete a data table for Part Two of the lab. It should include the name of the element, the colors, and the wavelength values of the observed lines.…

    • 470 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    1. Create and complete a data table for Part Two of the lab. It should include the name of the element, the colors, and the wavelength values of the observed lines.…

    • 319 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Hi Im Homework

    • 486 Words
    • 2 Pages

    1. Create and complete a data table for Part Two of the lab. It should include the name of the element, the colors, and the wavelength values of the observed lines.…

    • 486 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Discuss some real-world examples of radiation and some of the ways that society uses this radiation (honors).…

    • 375 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Plutonium and New York

    • 337 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Bibliography: /b><br><li>Encyclopedia of science and technology, 7th edition. McGraw Hill, New York. Copyright 1992.<br><li>Stwrtka, Albert. A guide to the elements. Oxford press, New York. Copyright 1996.<br><li>Knapp, Brian. Uranium and other radioactive elements. Croiler, New York. Copyright 1996<br><li>Encarta Computer Encyclopedia.…

    • 337 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Unit 2 Review KEY

    • 832 Words
    • 3 Pages

    11. What is the difference between nuclear reactions and chemical reactions? (hint: which parts of the atom are involved)…

    • 832 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Radiotherapy

    • 3974 Words
    • 16 Pages

    One third of people in Britain will develop cancer at some time during their lives and about half are cured. Opportunities for active treatment are increasing, with improvements in radiotherapy and chemotherapy and the development of novel biological and molecular treatment approaches. Of all cancer patients - 22% are cured by surgery, 18% by radiotherapy and 5% by chemotherapy alone or in combination with surgery or radiotherapy. Radiotherapy remains the most effective nonsurgical treatment modality forming a central provision of treatment in Cancer Centres and is solely responsible for or significantly contributes to cure in 40% of the long-term survivors of cancer. 40-45% of all cancer patients will require radiotherapy…

    • 3974 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The half-life of a radioisotope is defined as the amount of time necessary for one-half of the quantity of nuclide to decay and be converted into another elements. The conversions involve either alpha or beta particle release and the reaction can be followed by measuring the number of particles given off. A nuclear scaler was used to measure the amount of radiation evolved and graphical interpretations did allow calculation of the half-life.…

    • 774 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Radioisotopes

    • 9133 Words
    • 37 Pages

    adioisotopes: What Are They and How Are They Made?What are isotopes?The isotopes of an element are all the atoms that have in their nucleus the number of protons (atomic number) corresponding to the chemical behavior of that element. However, the isotopes of a single element vary in the number of neutrons in their nuclei. Since they still have the same number of protons, all these isotopes of an element have identical chemical behavior. But since they have different numbers of neutrons, these isotopes of the same element may have different radioactivity. An isotope that is radioactive is called a radioisotope or radionuclide. Two examples may help clarify this.The most stable isotope of uranium, U-238, has an atomic number of 92 (protons) and an atomic weight of 238 (92 protons plus 146 neutrons). The isotope of uranium of greatest importance in atomic bombs, U-235, though, has three fewer neutrons. Thus, it also has an atomic number of 92 (since the number of protons has not changed) but an atomic weight of 235 (92 protons plus only 143 neutrons). The chemical behavior of U-235 is identical to all other forms of uranium, but its nucleus is less stable, giving it higher radioactivity and greater susceptibility to the chain reactions that power both atomic bombs and nuclear fission reactors. Another example is iodine, an element essential for health; insufficient iodine in one 's diet can lead to a goiter. Iodine also is one of the earliest elements whose radioisotopes were used in what is now called nuclear medicine. The most common, stable form of iodine has an atomic number of 53 (protons) and an atomic weight of 127 (53 protons plus 74 neutrons). Because its nucleus has the "correct" number of neutrons, it is stable and is not radioactive. A less stable form of iodine also has 53 protons (this is what makes it behave chemically as iodine) but four extra neutrons, for a total atomic weight of 131 (53 protons and 78 neutrons). With "too many" neutrons in its…

    • 9133 Words
    • 37 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The organization of the Radiation Safety Program for NRC License No. 24-0167-11 is shown in Figure 1-1, Radiation Safety Organization. Use of all radioactive materials at Washington University and Washington University Medical Center (WU/WUMC) is governed by Executive Management, the Radiation Safety Officer and two safety committees: 1. The Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) has authority over all uses of radioactive materials at WU/WUMC except for the review of human research involving radioactive drugs. The current membership is given in the RSC Membership table. 2. The Radioactive Drug Research Committee (RDRC) has authority over human research involving radioactive drugs. Current RDRC membership and contact information is given in the RDRC Membership table. In addition, the Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) has two active subcommittees that address specific issues. 1. The RSC Applications Subcommittee is scheduled to meet each week to review applications submitted by research faculty. The current membership is given in the Applications Subcommittee Membership table. 2. The RSC Positron-Emitting Radionuclides and Cyclotron Safety Subcommittee (PERCS Subcommittee) meets several times a year to review safety issues associated with the use of particle accelerators used for the on-site production of radioactive materials, and the use of positron-emitting radionuclides. The current membership is given in the PERCS Subcommittee Membership table. 1.2 RADIATION SAFETY OFFICER The Radiation Safety Officer (RSO) is Susan M. Langhorst, Ph.D., CHP Phone: 362−2988 Email: langhors@msnotes.wustl.edu The RSO is appointed by the Chancellor of the University and serves as Executive Secretary of the Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) and as a member of the Radioactive Drug Research Committee (RDRC). The RSO serves as director of the Radiation Safety Office, a division of the WU Environmental Health…

    • 560 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Summary Sheet on Mole

    • 278 Words
    • 2 Pages

    4. The MS provides us: number of isotopes, relative isotopic mass (Ir) of each isotope, relative abundance.…

    • 278 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    chem 2

    • 378 Words
    • 4 Pages

    1. Create and complete a data table for Part Two of the lab. It should include the name of the element, the colors, and the wavelength values of the observed lines.…

    • 378 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cheat Sheet

    • 1329 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Radioactivity - nucleus of an atom falls apart, releasing high-energy particles and gamma rays that destroy other atoms…

    • 1329 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Nt1310 Unit 6 Lab Report

    • 886 Words
    • 4 Pages

    3. In your own words, explain Thomson’s and Rutherford’s contribution to the atomic theory. Give sketches to substantiate your answer. 4. Explain how Bohr contributed in defining the structure of the atom. 5. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful diagnostic tool used in medicine. The imagers used in hospitals operate at a frequency of 400 MHz (1 MHz = 106 Hz). Calculate: (a) The wavelength…

    • 886 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    2

    • 421 Words
    • 2 Pages

    1 Create and complete a data table for Part Two of the lab. It should include the name of the element, the colors, and the wavelength values of the observed lines.…

    • 421 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays