Preview

Opposition to Civil Rights 1945-68

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
576 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Opposition to Civil Rights 1945-68
How far do you agree that the opposition to the Civil Rights Movement did more to help the movement than to hinder it?

The Civil rights movement from 1955-1968 faced opposition from a variety of different individuals, groups and institutions. In some ways the opposition helped the movement to progress, but for the most part, the strong opposition hindered the movements success.

In terms of federal opposition, none of the presidents opposed the actual objectives of the civil rights movement, however they all opposed the methods. Eisenhower was a gradualist and rarely took the initiative needed on the issues. Kennedy was similar, and therefore their actions were slow, and only put into place when forced such as with the freedom rides where the increased violence left Kennedy with no choice. However, president Johnson was the most radical of the presidents during this period. His various signings including the important civil rights acts of 1964 and 1965 as well as his continued work with the movement brought about significant change and improvement between 1963 and 1965 for racial equality. Congress on the other hand, did much to weaken the civil rights Acts, for example senator Thurmond staged the longest one person filibuster in American history to try and kill the 1957 bill, which prolonged the success of the movement to an extent as the longer time it took Bills to be put into place, the less equality progress could be made.

The movement received a large amount of local opposition. Politicians were generally more strongly opposed to a racial justice than national politicians and did everything in their power to prevent de-segregation from happening. Faubus, for example, used a combination of violence; propaganda and legal measures to stop the integration of little rock high school. However these ‘tactics’ of violent opposition toward the movement, another example being role of Bull Connor in the Birmingham campaign where he used a water cannon as a

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    How significant was Lyndon B Johnson in improving civil rights for African-Americans during his presidency (1963-69)?…

    • 1019 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    White racism and intimidation was a very significant factor that slowed the civil rights movement. This is evident in the South in which the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Council were lynching blacks quite frequently. Additionally, after the ruling of Plessy vs. Ferguson (1896) of ‘separate but equal’, segregation was made legal, therefore southerners took it so far that Supreme Court rulings in favour of blacks were completely defied, such as in the Little Rock Crisis where Governor Faubus stopped black students from entering the high school despite previous rulings from Brown II (1955). This intimidation from supremacist groups and resistance from state government and general citizens slowed progress significantly because blacks were now afraid to campaign for fear of being lynched meaning that any effort made by blacks for equality was often negated by this strong resistance in the South. However, the resistance also had a positive effect on civil rights progress, such as in the Birmingham Movement 1963 in which the violence encouraged by Chief of Police Eugene ‘Bull’ Connor actually caused nationwide media attention which increased white sympathy and therefore made progress easier for blacks. Therefore racism in the South was a major obstacle before the 1950’s because any de jure change never resulted in de facto, however, after this point, campaigners targeted overtly racist places for their campaigns which was very advantageous for progress, meaning…

    • 1180 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The period 1945 to 1964 was where African Americans campaigned for their civil rights, and they aimed to improve the lives of black people, to some extent the federal government was involved in the improvement of the stays of black people including the presidents, the congress, the supreme courts and the FBI. However it was not the federal government alone who improved the status of black people because civil right campaigns such as the NAACP.…

    • 532 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Peaceful protest in the years 1955 to 1964 helped the civil rights movement little by little through the use of forcing the government to implement legal change. The laws that were passed mostly ended segregation in public places such as the law passed in 1956 that banned segregation of busses. This law was a result of the Browder vs. Gayle case that revolved around Aurelia Browder who refused to give up her seat to a white person, this stemmed from the Montgomery Bus Boycott of the previous year. She was backed up by the NACCP and the case went all the way to the Supreme Court who ruled in her favour and thus making segregation on all bus services illegal. Peaceful protest also helped to gain the support of white people in power and ordinary white people, therefore putting more pressure on the government to make the demands of black people a reality. However peaceful protest was not very good at making de-jure legation into de-facto reality as it was very easy to ignore these laws due to wide spread racism and corrupt police forces. There were also other factors at work that were responsible for the success…

    • 769 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hoover – attempted to appoint a racist judge in SC, but stopped by NAACP. During this period it can be seen that presidents hindered the advancements of the Civil rights to a large extent, however it must be noted that president Grant and Lincoln did instigate the start of the civil rights movement and there actions without a doubt provided a pathway for AA civil rights advancement.…

    • 938 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Dbq: Analyze the 1960's

    • 707 Words
    • 3 Pages

    As the Vietnam War sparked, this brought about a change in Civil Rights more than anything. With African American leaders such as Martin Luther King and Malcolm X fighting for civil rights for African Americans, this small group started to become more equal citizens in the eyes of the government. The Civil Rights movement came to a head during the 1960's, after much work in the 1950's, and the effects are still being felt today. In Document A from the SNCC in April of 1960, the idea of nonviolence was the main source of progress. “Through nonviolence, courage displaces fear; love transforms hate.” This idea of fighting with no violence was pushed by Martin Luther…

    • 707 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Civil Rights Movement were movements that happened during the 1950’s to the 1960’s that were created to combat racial discrimination against African Americans and making it illegal to do so. The movement ended up being so much more than a fight to end racial discrimination. It was a time regaining racial dignity and freedom from white oppression. Throughout the period of time in which African Americans fought for equality, desegregation and racism, the United States made massive changes. Beginning with the Jim Crow Laws, the countless court cases and the vast impact on the Civil Rights leaders, our country made changes with new teachings and changes in many ignorant minds.…

    • 1044 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Once again the bill met with opposition in the House by the Democrats. The bill finally passed in the House and arrived in the Senate. It was gutted by the Democrats before being passed into law. These efforts by Eisenhower played a prominent role in helping secure the civil rights movement during the 1960s and 1970s.…

    • 778 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The African-American struggle for civil rights began long before the Civil Rights movement of the 1960’s and before the Emancipation Proclamation for that matter. The most recent struggle endured by African-Americans was the Civil Rights movements of the 1960’s that was figured headed by Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King along with other figures pivotal to the common goals of equal rights for African-Americans. The goals of the Civil Rights movement included civil rights and equal treatment of African-Americans along with the right to vote for those individuals. The federal government positively and negatively affected the Civil Rights Movement as well. Although the Civil Rights is seen as a success there are still many ways in which it failed.…

    • 545 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    How far were the forces opposed to civil rights responsible for the failures of the civil rights movement in the 1960s?…

    • 1584 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Civil Rights movement of the mid 20th century was a time of great social change in America. Many people such as Martin Luther King Jr., decided at this time that they could not wait any longer for justice. The racial discrimination and segregation had reached unbearable and intolerable heights that had been hurting the African-Americans in more ways than one could even imagine. They suffered from violence, in their community and by others, as well as extreme poverty and…

    • 1595 Words
    • 46 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Civil Rights Dbq

    • 584 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Civil Rights DBQ In the 1960's the movement for African American civil rights dramatically changed due strong activist, presidential commitments, and numerous protest. Every part of what helped changed the civil rights movement was a key aspect in the gaining of African American civil rights. All of these movements were composed of inspirational leaders such and Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcom X in which there goals were to end all injustices for not only African Americans but for all.…

    • 584 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Firstly the 4 presidents in this time period were Harry Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. They each have different attitudes towards civil rights. Truman was born in the border state of Missouri and as a result experienced segregation first hand. As a young man Truman was racist, he used abusive language referring to African Americans as niggers. In addition at the age of 38 he paid $10 to join the KU KLUX KLAN, but Truman outgrew his prejudices and became the first American President to publicly challenge segregation and the first to pledge his support for civil rights. In 1946 Truman established the Presidents Committee on Civil Rights. He commissioned them to produce a report examining the experience of racial minorities in America. The report ‘to secure these rights’…

    • 1919 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    tactics-- sit-ins, boycotts, and marches, the goal was to focus attention on getting rid of Jim Crow.34…

    • 4764 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The civil rights movement had been one of the largest, ongoing battles in America over equality of black civilians. Not everything had changed with the 1964 civil rights act and there is still inequality today. In 1960 there were still several problems such as the police force. The police forces were still racist and black citizens were not given the same amount of care as the white citizens were given. Also a number of the police force was members of the KKK, which means that towns and states were, ran with social inequality. However, since the 1940s lots had changed however there was still progress to be made.…

    • 1057 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays