Nonviolent vs. Violent Revolution

Better Essays
Dulany Harms
Professor Guneyli
ENG-101-05
September 15, 2008
To Be Violent Or Not To Be Violent? As long as there have been people on earth, there have been societal injustices. Societal injustices occur when one segment of society believes it ways are better than another segment of society and tries to oppress them. Eventually, the oppressed will revolt against the oppressors. When this happens, the revolution can take one of two approaches. There can be a violent movement or a non-violent movement. Revolutionaries such as Che Guevara, Fidel Castro and Adolf Hitler used violence and death to accomplish their goals. Revolutionaries such as Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Dalai Lama have used non-violent means such as strikes, marches, and sit-ins. Non-violent revolutions are characterized by peaceful demonstrations rather than violence, they set a better example for future generations, and they have met with more success than violent revolutions. As a whole, society has benefited more from non-violent revolutions than violent ones. Violent movements, revolutions, and uprisings usually involve bloodshed. Che Guevara, Fidel Castro, and Adolf Hitler are three examples of violent revolutionaries. Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara was born in Argentina in 1928. Due to his contempt for the corrupt Argentine militarist government, he became a dedicated Marxist and devoted his life to revolutionary causes. In 1953, Guevara left Argentina to take part in a Communist revolution in Guatemala. After the failure of that revolution, he then fled to Mexico where he was introduced to another Communist revolutionary in exile, Fidel Castro. In 1956, Guevara, Castro and 80 others attempted to overthrow Cuban leader Fulgencio Batista. After that failed attempt, they retreated into the mountains of southern Cuba where they honed their guerilla tactics until they successfully overthrew Batista and installed Castro as the leader of Cuba.
Che Guevara was such a violent person



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