Multiple Governments and Intergovernmen

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Multiple Governments and Intergovernmental Relationships The local level of government consists of systems that operate independent of one another in every city across the country. The state level of government is similar to the federal level. Each state has its own system of government that operates under the umbrella of the federal government. State governments consist of three branches just as the federal government does. State governments are responsible for things such as state lawmaking, collecting state taxes building and maintaining state highways and funding state parks and preserves. The federal government has more power and authority than state or local governments, although each level has the power to check each other. The federal government has an entire system of federal employees responsible for running the day-to-day operations(Bowman & Kearney, 2014, Chapter 2).
The different levels of government interrelate by supporting representative at each level with its state’s concerns. For example, in the reserved reading the citizens of New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania are having concerns of possible pollution caused by hydraulic fracturing. The environmental protection groups in each state are concerned that the chemicals used by natural gas companies are harmful to the environment and to the health of the citizens (Energy Vision, 2011). The governors of each state listed above, along with the governor of Delaware form the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC). The DRBC has been in successful in the past with implementing regulations for chemicals used by hydraulic fracturing companies, so they submitted a proposal to legislation for the implementation of the FRAC Act, which calls for a revision of the Safe Water Act, with hopes that Congress passes it (Energy Vision, 2011).
The solutions that the governments are trying to achieve are the well-being of its citizens and maintain economic growth. By gaining knowledge of the chemicals use in



References: Bowman, A. O 'M., & Kearney, R.C. (2014). State and Local Government (9th ed.). Retrieved from The University of Phoenix eBook Collection. Energy Vision. (2011, October Day). Hydrofracking: a need for responsible gas drilli regulations and the role of natural gas. A white paper by Energy Vision. Retrieved from http://energy-vision.org/pdf/HydrofrackingFactSheet3.pdf

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