Preview

Missing Women

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
898 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Missing Women
There is a huge number of missing women in Canada, and an extremely large number of these women are Aboriginal. Why do Aboriginal women seem more vulnerable? The majority of these missing Aboriginal women were living on the streets, living in poverty and working in the sex trade industry before their disappearances. Why were all of these women in the same situation? I believe that the Conflict Theory explains the hardships, the abuse and the discrimination that each of these women faced before they went missing. The Conflict Theory states that society is marked by power struggles over scarce resources; inequities result in conflict; social change is inevitable. Since the theft of Aboriginal land and destruction of traditional ways of life, many First Nations people live in extreme poverty that has lasted for generations. This removal of First Nations people from their land caused great hardships and a breakdown in their traditional systems causing a great deal of dysfunction within their own communities. These dysfunctions lead to physical abuse and substances abuse. The Conflict Theory also states that people are inherently good, but are corrupted by society and its economic structure. For the Aboriginal people economic factors served as the initial catalyst for change within Aboriginal societies. Aboriginal people were first directed away from hunting into the economic order of the fur trade society. Gradually, more and more of them became removed from the land and went into settlements with a welfare economy. These changes to Aboriginal lifestyle distorted their traditional way of life. Again causing more hardships and poverty. Inequality; the dominance of groups of people over other groups of people; oppression and exploitation, it is probably the biggest obstacle that Aboriginal people faced after the introduction of residential schools for Aboriginal children. Children were removed from their families and homes at a young age, some to return eight

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Aboriginals in Canada have always suffered and experienced hardships since the day their land was stolen. Despite all the rights, treaties, or equality statements presented they still feel the inequality and their problems remain out of the spotlight. Even though Aboriginal men go through many difficulties throughout their lives, Aboriginal women tend to suffer face more struggles than the men. These women do not have equal rights, have been forgotten, are being murdered without notice, and are not treated as second-class citizens and at times not even human. Aboriginal women remain undeterred; however, by these struggles, and persevere, while maintaining their strength and cultural identity. This essay will portray the analysis of different authors and their texts, portraying…

    • 1584 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    • Loss of identity which occurred due to Aboriginal people being denied access to sacred sites and religion, and also due to children who were taken away from their parents and communities, and grew up in government institutions. Many…

    • 213 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Aboriginal Inequality

    • 2010 Words
    • 9 Pages

    Social Inequality with Canadian Aboriginals SOC 300 Dr. Kelly Train Milica Rados 500460778 Different ethnic backgrounds immigrate to Canada making it a very multicultural society. Immigrants coming to Canada have made it progress to a more multicultural society, making other nations believe that this is the case, however this does not include native societies that have been living in Canada for the longest period of time. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how Aboriginals live in Canada. This paper argues that aboriginals in Canada are not treated with the same equality as non-aboriginals livening in Canada, even though Canada is known as a multicultural society. By studying the history of Aboriginal settlement in Canada and understanding their connection to the land there is a better understanding of why taking over their land is a social issue. By taking over their land their sense of connection to nature was taken away which was a big part of the Aboriginal culture. This caused educational inequality and also the inequality they face within their workplace and the wages they receive. By studying history, their culture, education and their current economic state it becomes more clear why this is a social issue in Canada and how that takes away from the multiculturalism Canada is known for.…

    • 2010 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Although Aboriginals were technically citizens since 1947, they were not treated as such with poor housing and amenities living in towns where racism was entrenched. Aboriginal people suffered verbal and physical abuse along with segregation and prejudice.…

    • 349 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Another form of discrimination that was placed upon the Aboriginal population was the assimilation families and children faced through the integration of residential schools. The idea behind residential schools was to try and “civilize” the Aboriginal nation. Children were taken from their families and were forced into forgetting their language, traditions, hunting and gathering skills, until they were entirely “European”. The discrimination faced by the Aboriginal nation still to this day is well beyond horrific. In her article “The Queen and I: discrimination against women in the Indian Act continues” Lynn Gehl states that “the goal of the Indian Act was one of assimilation and the arduous task of civilizing the savages--a national agenda” (Gehl, 2000). Residential schools, paternity laws, denied access to Indian status and criminalization of Indigenous culture imposed from the government are all examples of how the Aboriginal population has been racialized and discriminated from European settlers and the country of…

    • 1312 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Conflict Perspective

    • 1319 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Conflict Theory is seen at the macro level and is defined as being made up of individuals competing for limited resources socially, politically, and materially (Keirns, Strayer, Griffiths, 2013). In the Conflict Theory it is the unavoidable inequalities in large systems and corporations that allow society to function. Because of these inequalities some groups in a given society will receive more resources and benefits than other groups in that same society. Throughout evolution and down to our very primal roots it has always been about the competition of limited resources and it is because of our advantages in those resources that we have evolved as a society. The conflict theory embodies these pure, primal concepts in much of the same way allowing society to evolve and move forward based on the fight for resources. The people within a society who have the advantage in resources will do whatever they have to to maintain this advantage and continued success. One of the major sociologists associated with the Conflict Theory is Karl Marx. Marx focused on the economic differences between social classes forming the beginning and foundation of the Conflict Theory (Keirns, Strayer, Griffiths,…

    • 1319 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Indigenous Disadvantage

    • 2092 Words
    • 9 Pages

    For the last 200 years Indigenous people have been victims of discrimination, prejudice and disadvantage. Poor education, poor living conditions and general poverty are still overwhelming issues for a large percentage of our people and we remain ‘as a group, the most poverty stricken sector of the working class’ in Australia (Cuthoys 1983).…

    • 2092 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Statistics have shown that 63% of Aboriginal women in Canada have been subjected to domestic violence (Brownridge, 2008, p. 367). When comparing the violence ratio of Aboriginal women and non-Aboriginal women the Aboriginal female has an eight time greater chance to be a target of violence, such as spousal homicide and severe abuse (Brownridge, 2003, p.66). We can turn this problem around through education and restoring the Aboriginal peoples’ culture, beliefs, and rituals that promote healthy self-identity and culture identity. One of the main ways to help encourage cultural healing is ensuring Aboriginal women have a safe environment to live in and raise their families. The author of this paper will review research on domestic violence against Aboriginal women in Canada; concentrating on an Aboriginal perspective on what is considered domestic violence…

    • 1313 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Aboriginals Essay

    • 862 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Aboriginal people had been exploited, treated unfairly and oppressed by people in their own nation, this took place during world war 2 and continued for many more year's. Aborigines struggled to gain there right's and to be treated as an equal, just like white Australian's. White Australian's believed they had greater natural abilities and higher standard of civilisation. There has been policies of Protection, Assimilation, Integration and Self-determination.…

    • 862 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Aboriginal Women in Canada

    • 1382 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women expressed concern about hundred of cases of missing, as well as murdered aboriginal women in Canada in the past two decades. The UN called on Canada to establish a national action plan for families that include services for aboriginal women experiencing violence, including shelter, and government care, and information about missing persons.…

    • 1382 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Conflict theory has been criticized for its focus on change and neglect of social stability as the change is very little compare to the social stability.…

    • 113 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Yellow Quill Crisis

    • 211 Words
    • 1 Page

    However, it is widely accepted that the cultural genocide and social disruption perpetrated over generations through displacement, discriminatory legislation such as the Indian Act, and federal programs such as the residential school system created enduring hardships among Aboriginal peoples and hindered the re-establishment of social networks and the development of stable…

    • 211 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    impossible to relate to, yet it seems to be happening to many aboriginal communities today. Why. I…

    • 549 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    What this means, is that as a society we need to talk about the problem, give everyone a voice to express the difficulties that they faced or are currently facing heal from the trauma that has devastated their lives (Citation Missing). Furthermore, we need to look at the reasons why government officials creates structures that discriminate, institutionalize and disintegrate members of a community (Citation Missing). This is more prevalent in Aboriginal communities when compared non-aboriginal communities, the cycle of violence which leads to incarceration is never ending (Citation Missing). Therefore, unless root cause of these problems are identified and addressed, this social phenomenon will continue to affect these communities (Citation Missing). Furthermore, the violence plaguing Aboriginal communities are the tip of the iceberg, therefore, unless as a society we engage in some form of social change that considers rehabilitation instead of retribution, the problem will persist (Citation Missing). Unfortunately, while the Aboriginal society was colonized and is still facing the aftermath of it, present day criminal justice system colonizes our mind by telling us how to think and address certain situations (Citation…

    • 968 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The residential schools truly killed the Indian within the Aboriginals, which was their primary objective after establishment.The reserves destroyed the customs of Aboriginals through its compact living conditions; and the lack of education or stress caused the Aboriginals to take atrocious actions. Furthermore, suicide rates would not be so high if the Aboriginals were not assimilated and enforced to follow the english way of…

    • 1100 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays