Guest of the Nation by Frank O' Connor

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Frank O' Connor's short story, "Guest of the Nation", exemplifies an effective plot as all good writing does through the utilization of rising and falling action. With the implementation of the major components integrated to form the plot, O'Connor is able to construct an alurring and exciting series of situations for his readers to enjoy. In essense,"Guest of the Nation" stays true to the conventions of a cogent plot as we as readers are able to experience every second of this unfolding story.

O' Connor begins his story with the exposition to slowing introduce the readers to the events at hand and helps us to get situated into the early stages of the story. In the beginning of story, O' Connor places us in a casual situation, over a poker table. "...the little Englishman, Hawkins, would light the lamp and bring out the cards" (O' Connor 27). As the situation unfolds, we soon learn about the setting and all of the characters through the narration of Bonaparte, the main protagonist. It is from his perspective and thoughts that helps us understand what is happening before us.

With the progression of the plot, we encounter complications that drives the plot through a series of rising action. "'The enemy have prisoners belonging to us...If they shoot our prisoners, we'll shoot theirs'" (O' Connor 29). This introduction of complications helps keep the readers awake and alert to the cues the author places for them in order to help them progress along the plot smoothly. This also helps to stir up interest within the reader to keep them involved with the story.

With the tension building from the complications, the plot finally hits its peak and we are pulled into the climax of the story, "Hawkins had begun to say something else when Donovan fired..." (O' Connor 33). This quote signifies the peak of the tesion. At this point of the story, the readers are finally released from all the complications and all of their presumptions and are exposed to the cold hard

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