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ETH 316 Blood Money

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ETH 316 Blood Money
Blood Money Scenario
Billy Brass
ETH/316
March 29, 2012
Christopher Whetstine
Blood Money Scenario
Moral responsibility of all participants When it comes to human organs and individuals buying them from prisoners that have been executed to survive, one will have to ask themselves if they are making an ethical decision. Buying and selling human organs is illegal in the United States yet it is happening right now as we enter into the year 2015, where a lot of critical thinking has gone into this industry and made a worldwide business out of it. Although China was the leading source of this crude and horrid operation, the buying and selling of human organs is happening right here on American soil. All parties involved in this side chain black market business, face the respect of other black market business icons in faith and trusting service. The other side of the story is how these folks stomach the thought of selling human organs for profit and the ethical responsibility the have to their country. The morals that a purchase has may be good, but money talks a good bargain and leads the brain to believe in said act.

Stakeholder's moral failings Ordering an execution and then knowingly preparing the bodies for a liver transplant is something that you or I would say it unethical but this just goes to show that everyone has different decision-making skills. How these individuals apart of this business were raised and taught ethics is very different from how we were taught here in the United States. Some would say that because it is a foreign country that they have different beliefs and find no wrong doing in this exchange of organs, their critical thinking was executed on their ethical template. Providing a perfectly healthy organ from an executed prisoner to help save someone's life is entirely ethically correct to them. Taking your people's organs for sale, even though one had committed crime, the punishment of death was only to procure



References: ABC Video on Demand University of Phoenix. (2006). Blood Money. Retrieved from ABC Video on Demand University of Phoenix, ETH/316 website.

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