Preview

Essay On The Differences Between 1763 And 1776

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
525 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Essay On The Differences Between 1763 And 1776
During the years 1763 and 1776, the British government and the American Colonists were constantly at odds. Issues such as advancing west, taxes, and increased British control caused a rift between the two sides which eventually ended in a revolution
The proclamation of 1763 was issued to stop fighting between the Native Americans and the settlers. It did stop fighting for the moment, but, it also angered many of the colonists and the Native Americans. The colonists were upset because their opportunities were being cut short. By not allowing the settlers to advance west, the British were exerting control over the area. This was just the beginning of a long line of acts that would have a profound effect on America.
Another act that was enforced by the British was the Sugar Act of 1774. The sugar act enforced the tax on sugar and lowered the tax on molasses which hurt the sugar industry in the
…show more content…
The Currency Act of 1764, put a halt to new money being printed, and the Stamp Act of 1765 put a tax on most printed documents. Both acts put a strain on the economy, which made it harder for the colonists, but, profitable for the British. Even after the stamp act was repealed in 1766, the British government further angered colonists by passing the Declaratory Act, which stated that parliament had authority over the colonies, “in all cases whatsoever”.
The Mutiny Act of 1765 was another cause of dissent among the colonists. It required that colonists allow British troops to stay in their homes. Led by Charles Townshend, who was the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Townsend enforced more taxes and were very hard on the colonists. The Boston Massacre was another event that angered colonists. It was an event in 1770 where British soldiers fired into a crowd and killed several people. The colonists who already felt like there was too much British control, were really riled

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Great Britain imposed several acts during the middle of the 1760s that angered the colonists, including the Sugar Act of 1764. The Sugar Act lowered the tax on sugar imported from the West Indies. Making it cheaper to pay the tax then to smuggle the sugar in. A Currency act was also implemented during 1764 that banned the creation of paper bills in North America. The British feared that these currencies would devalue their own currency Great Britain’s Parliament also passed the Quartering Act in 1765. This act forced colonists to house and feed any soldiers that didn’t return back to Great Britain if there wasn’t enough room for them at military barracks. 1500 British Troops arrived in New York City in 1766. New York refused to comply with the Quartering Act and did not supply troops with housing. (64)…

    • 913 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Harbinger Study Notes

    • 2960 Words
    • 10 Pages

    The American Revolution began in 1775 as open conflict between the united thirteen coloniesand Great Britain. By the Treaty of Paris that ended the war in 1783, the colonies had won their independence. While no one event can be pointed to as the actual cause of the revolution, the war began as a disagreement over the way in which Great Britain treated the colonies versus the way the colonies felt they should be treated. Americans felt they deserved all the rights of Englishmen. The British, on the other hand, felt that the colonies were created to be used in the way that best suited the crown and parliament. This conflict is embodied in one of the rallying cries of the American Revolution: No Taxation Without Representation.…

    • 2960 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    There were several events that led to the Revolutionary War between the American colonies and Great Britain. The British passed several policies to get colonies to help pay for their troops to defend the western frontier of America. Parliament also passed several Acts intended to increase revenue from the colonies. The Proclamation of 1763 was passed to reserve land west of the Appalachians for the Indians. In 1764, The Sugar Act put a three penny tax on each gallon of molasses entering the colonies outside Great Britain. The Quartering Act of 1765, intended to make the colonists house British troops. The Stamp Act was also passed to force the colonies to buy tax stamps placed on newspaper, diplomas, legal documents, etc. More and more colonists were crying out, no taxation without representation. They insisted that Britain had no right to tax them at all, since the colonists were unrepresented in the British government.…

    • 1361 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    American revolution:causes

    • 1004 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The American Revolution began in 1775 as open conflict between the united thirteen colonies and Great Britain. By the Treaty of Paris that ended the war in 1783, the colonies had won their independence. While no one event can be pointed to as the actual cause of the revolution, the war began as a disagreement over the way in which Great Britain treated the colonies versus the way the colonies felt they should be treated. Americans felt they deserved all the rights of Englishmen. The British, on the other hand, felt that the colonies were created to be used in the way that best suited the crown and parliament. This conflict is embodied in one of the rallying cries of the American Revolution: No Taxation Without Representation.…

    • 1004 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The War That Made America

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The French and Indian war went on from 1756 to 1763. It was also known as the Seven Years’ War, it lasted seven years. It greatly involved the Native Americans and affected the relationship that they had with the French. The British and the French were fighting to see who would take over the colonies in North America. The British won. After the British won the French and Indian war, they began taking over the colonies and started to take some rights away from the Americans. For example, the British gained a lot of property in North America as a result of winning the war and they wanted to limit property, so they restricted the colonists from moving west of the Appalachian Mountains. The British had also put many of their soldiers in America to protect their interests, and that made the colonists feel unsafe. The British also started taxing the Americans and enacting new laws because of the debt that they were left with after the war. The Americans were being pushed to the limit; it was not fair what was being done. They were being treated unfairly. These points were when the feelings of disloyalty towards the British began to arise in the American colonists.…

    • 819 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The colonies rebelling against the British, led to different events that led up to the American Revolution. The Boston tea party was one event that led to the people overthrowing tea into the sea to protest against British taxation. The Intolerable Act was the British way of punishing the colonies after the Boston Tea Party. The Stamp Act was the taxation of paper documents. All these events contributed to the build of tension between the colonies and the British, which lead to the American…

    • 509 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    to pay off their debt, they taxed many of the goods being shipped to the new world. This action was called “The Stamp Act” and was put into effect in the colonies in 1765. Taxes were very easily to collect because colonists could not spread out across the Appalachian mountains. The stamp act angered colonists because why would the british parliament be able to tax the colonies without anyone to argue the law. Many colonists took up to saying, “No taxation without representation”. In the same year as the stamp act, Great Britain sent…

    • 935 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    American Colonies Dbq

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages

    It wasn’t until the Stamp act of 1765 that Americans started to have financial difficulties, this act affected almost all of the colonists since it placed a tax on all printed documents. The stamp act however was different from previous tax acts, although other acts raised some income for the British government that was never their main purpose. The stamp act’s main purpose was to raise income and to help alleviate some of the economic troubles caused by previous wars. What made the colonist most agitated was that they had no say in the making of the act since they were not represented properly in parliament. The colonists tried to appeal the law with answers such as the Virginia Resolves but parliament eventually passed the Declaratory Act, which reassured the fact that parliament had full control over the colonists in all situations. After the Declaratory Act, parliament continued to bombard the colonists with unjust laws, one large program of laws was called the Townshend Program. This program reinforced laws already put in place that the colonists refused to obey and also created new ones. The acts and laws put in place by Townshend, except for the tea tax, were eventually appealed by Britain to end the colonists’ boycotts. But this program got the colonists starting to think about a revolution, especially after an over exaggerated event known as the Boston Massacre. The colonists tried to spread and keep the resistance strong mostly through the writing and talking of colonists in the colonies. The last acts to finally push the Americans into revolting were known as the Coercive Acts, also known as the intolerable Acts to most of the colonists. It created numerous boycotts around the colonies and was the final piece of unjust laws enforced by the…

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    It basically taxed legal papers, magazines, newspapers, and other documents in the colonies. This made the colonists feel used by the British and became the cause of the severe resentment that the colonies would begin to feel towards the British(Doc C). Resentment or no resentment, the parliament issued more acts in hopes of solving their economic crisis (debts). The Quartering act of 1765 was a way for parliament to order colonial legislatures to pay for British soldiers on their soil. They also published the Townshend revenue Acts, so that they can impose taxes on many items imported into the colonies. Furthermore, they published the Tea Act to make British East India Company the only company allowed to import tea into the colonies and in 1775 was published the American Prohibitory Act, which was an order to trade embargo and tells the British’s powerful navy to seize any ship trading with the colonies (Doc…

    • 708 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    From the very beginning the American colonies were a revolutionary force waiting to be unleashed. Though there were many things that led up to the American Revolution many historians think that the events that took place in the year 1763 were huge turning points in the road to the revolution. The year 1763 changed the way a lot of colonists felt towards England and vise versa. There were Many things that took place in 1763 I will talk about three of them, The French and Indian war (also know as the Seven years war), The British Mercantilism and taxes, and the intolerable acts along with some other laws past. The events that took place in 1763 were turning points that led to the American Revolution.…

    • 1200 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    In 1775 the American Revolution officially began, due to conflicts between the thirteen colonies and Britain. In 1783 the Treaty of Paris was signed, granting the colonies their independence. The important turning points in the colonies break with the mother country are the French and Indian War (1763), Common Sense by Thomas Paine (1776) and the signing of the Declaration of Independence (1776). The revolution began as a disagreement over the manner in which Britain treated the colonies, in contrast to the way the colonies felt they should be treated. Colonists felt they deserved the same rights as the English; on the other hand, Britain viewed them as only created to benefit the crown and parliament. This conflict is best shown in one of the most commonly used terms of the American Revolution: “No Taxation Without Representation.”…

    • 927 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Stamp Act

    • 1329 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The passing of the Stamp Act by Parliament in 1765 caused a rush of angry protests by the colonists in British America that perhaps "aroused and unified Americans as no previous political event ever had." It levied a tax on legal documents, almanacs, newspapers, and nearly every other form of paper used in the colonies. Adding to this hardship was the need for the tax to be paid in British sterling, not in colonial paper money. Although this duty had been in effect in England for over half a century and was already in effect in several colonies in the 1750's, it called into question the authority of Parliament over the overseas colonies that had no representation therein.…

    • 1329 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The British made the colonists feel weak politically with all the new laws at the time. The Proclamation of 1763 prohibited the…

    • 763 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Acts Chart

    • 1433 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The British replaced the Molasses Act with the Sugar Act in 1764, signaling the end of salutary neglect that coincided with the end of the French and Indian War.…

    • 1433 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    1764 - The Currency Act prohibits the colonists from issuing any legal tender paper money. This act threatens to destabilize the entire colonial economy of both the industrial North…

    • 2211 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays