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Cybernetic and Social Construction

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Cybernetic and Social Construction
Cybernetics and Social Construction
LeeAnne Valentine
Coum5220
June 14, 2015
Dr. Everson

Cybernetics and Social Construction
In Marriage and Family Therapy field, cybernetics and social construction play an important aspect in how a therapist works with his or her clients. However, there are some aspects of cybernetics that may not be important in today’s society because of the evolution in humankind from the early 1920’s to today. In this time and age, cybernetics continues to be in tandem with social construction, and continues to affect psychology, especially in marriage and family therapy. This paper will present critical review of cybernetic and social construction.
Cybernetics
Cybernetics is defined as a “transdisciplnary approach for exploring regulatory systems, their structures, constracts and possibilities. Cybernetics is relevant to the study of systems, such as mechanical, physical, biological, cognitive, and social systems.” (xx) Guise (2009) stated that there are changes that take place during the treatment process in family therapy which are classified as first order cybernetics or second-order cybernetics. During the first-order change family patterns of interaction or sequences are altered at the behavioral level only but through second-order change the underlying beliefs of premises that govern family members behavior or promote specific reasons are altered” (p. 72). According to Guise (2011) and Keeney and Ross (1983) described cybernetics as “being a system which encompasses a recursive complementary relations between process of change and stability.” The concept of cybernetics is also an important key aspect in the development of family therapy in which includes “self-reference, feedback patterns, homeostasis, and self autonomy. Cybernetics is primarily concerned with understanding and managing the organization of systems” (Cybernetics, 2004).
The first-order cybernetics perspective gives rise to the idea of reality. By reality, truth



References: Becvar, R.J., & Becvar, D.S. (1994). The ecosystemic story: A story about stories. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 16(1), 22. Becvar, D.S., & Becvar, R.J. (2006). Family therapy: A systemic integration. Boston: Allyn &Bacon Hofman, L., (1990). Constructing Realties: An Art of Lenses. Family Process, 29(1), 1-12 Francois, C. (1999). Systemics and cybernetics in a historical perspective. Retrieved from John Wiley & Sons, Ltd website: http://www.nomads.usp.br/pesquisas/design/objetos_interativos/arquivos/restrito/francois_systemics_and_cybernetics.pdf Guise, R. W. (2015). Study guide for the marriage & family therapy national licensing examination. Jamaica Plain, MA: Family Solutions Corp. Hacking, I. (1999). The social construction of what? Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

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