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Articles of Confederation and Founding Fathers Energy

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Articles of Confederation and Founding Fathers Energy
“The Founding Fathers: A Reform Caucus in Action” by John P. Roche

a. What four factors does the author provide as reason for the success of the Constitutional Convention?

The four factors that Roche provided as reasons for the success of the Constitutional Convention were first George Washington’s involvement. George Washington was considered an American “father figure”, and his reputation was prestigious. Second, the Founding Fathers’ energy, leadership talents, and their communication network were more superior to their opponents. Third, the Founding Fathers’ skills were more effective than their opponents. They dominate and control the discussions. Fourth, the Founding Fathers were nationalists. They tried to maintain democracy which was the purpose of the American Revolution. They were willing to comprise for the better good of the people and country.

b. What about the Founding Fathers is Roche trying to dispel?

Roche tried to dispel the Founding Fathers’ motives behind the framing of the Constitution was not for personal financial gains. He stressed that they wanted to retain democracy for the country which was the main purpose of the American Revolution. He also stressed they were elitists. They were willing to compromise their ideas for the greater good of the country. Roche stated that the Constitution was a compromise between the small and large states.

c. Roche believes that the delegates at the Convention were divided into two groups. What were these two groups and how did they protect their interests in the new Constitution?

Roche believed the delegates at the Convention were divided into two groups – the federalists and the anti-federalists. The federalists were led by Alexander Hamilton. They believed the Constitution should be federalism, and it was good enough.

The anti-federalists were led by Thomas Jefferson. They believed the Constitution alone did not protect the rights of the people. They later added the Bill of Rights to

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