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To What Extent Is the Constitution of the Us Counter Revolutionary?

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To What Extent Is the Constitution of the Us Counter Revolutionary?
To what extent is the Constitution of the United States a ‘repressive’ Document?

The Constitution of the United States of America was the solution to fix the weaknesses that Articles of Confederation had caused the United States. The Constitution not only helped the United States gain more power but it also unified the states and creates a sense of nationalism. The Constitution eradicated any justification that the United States was weak and inferior. However, there are some constituents of the constitution that suggests that the constitution is not as honorable as it may seem. To what extent is the Constitution of the United States a “repressive” document? Certain aspects of the constitution exhibit how the authors of the constitution wanted to keep the wealthy to have high status and remain on top and the common folk far away from the top as possible with little to no status at all. By analyzing some amendments of the constitution, the evidence that the wealthy are retaining and hoarding power will become evident.
There are various reasons why the constitution could be viewed as a repressive document. Of the many reasons, it supports the upper class and discourages the middle class at having any real voice. The constitution’s original objective was to resolve the conflicts that the Articles of Confederation had created. The intention of the Articles of Confederation was to assist the United States in initiating progression and to generate a strong and unified society. The constitution eventually solved the problems of the Articles of Confederation and accomplished its objectives. However, as a result of the constitution, a major segregation between classes was established for years to come. (Bjornlund 1999, 23)
It’s difficult to grasp the idea that our founding fathers created a legal document that represents freedom and justice for their own economic self -interest. They have accomplished this by implementing laws to protect their equities against popularly



Cited: Amar, Akhil Reed. America 's Constitution A Biography. New York: Random House, 2005. Print. "Article I | LII / Legal Information Institute." LII | LII / Legal Information Institute. Web. 23 Jan. 2010. <http://topics.law.cornell.edu/constitution/articlei>. Bjornlund, Lydia D. U.S. Constitution blueprint for democracy. San Diego, CA: Lucent, 1999. Print. "The Constitution Explained - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net." Index Page - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net. Web. 31 Jan. 2010. <http://www.usconstitution.net/constquick.html>. History in Dispute - American Revolution (History in Dispute). Vol. 12. New York: St. James, 2003. Print. Pgs 69-71 "Introduction to the Constitutional Convention & American Founding." TeachingAmericanHistory.org -- Free Seminars and Summer Institutes for Social Studies Teachers. Web. 31 Jan. 2010. <http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org/convention/intro.html>.

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