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Rhetorical Analysis: The Fall of the Female Protagonist in Kids’ movies
As a 90’s born kid, I was exposed to various genre of children’s animation when I was young, from the likes of Beauty and The Beast to Snow White. In today’s world of kids’ films, I realized the appearance of female protagonists tends to fall from year to year. A blog post titled
“The Fall of the Female Protagonist in Kids’ movies” by Stefan Babich explains the role of female protagonists in children’s film. In this blog, Babich aims to give a voice to women by relating them to the role of female protagonists in children’s films. Babich adopt strategies like contrast, comparison and pathos to create a convincing blog to female readers.
In his blog, Babich uses contrast to explain the differences between Pixar and Disney on how each of them influenced the fall of female protagonist in kid’s film. Babich uses contrast to illustrate the number of female protagonists between Pixar and Disney. When Babich was thinking of female protagonists in Pixar movies, he states “There aren’t any. Not a single one.” It is clear to the reader that Disney was the winner over pixar with it’s overpowering dose of female protagonists such as Mulan, Cinderella and Belle.
Shortly after capturing the audiences’ attention, Babich started to appeal to the readers’ emotions by criticizing some stories in an animated movie would work just as fine with a female protagonist. “Is there any reason the rat in Ratatouille couldn’t have been a lady?” is one of the examples he thought that gender of the protagonist does not matter. This leaves the audience wondering if gender is really the most important characteristic of a character. Babich points out that the most important features might be the character’s personality or the story involves around the character.

The strategy adopted by Babich such as comparison and contrast were clearly effective in persuading the audience that female protagonist had

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