"What Is Normally Required For A Court To Have Personal Jurisdiction" Essays and Research Papers

  • What Is Normally Required For A Court To Have Personal Jurisdiction

    the structure and jurisdiction of the Scottish criminal and civil courts. Give examples of the types of cases these courts will hear and indicate which Scottish legal personnel you would expect to find there. Scottish courts are divided into two distinct and separate systems, each with its own jurisdiction and terminology. As stated above these are the civil and criminal courts. First of all I will look into the structure and jurisdiction of the civil courts. The civil court deals with disputes...

    Appeal, Court, Court of Session 2108  Words | 6  Pages

  • Jurisdiction APA

    there Jurisdiction? [Insert Name Here] [Insert Additional details here] Situation 1: Mike, a Utah resident, sues Jim, a Nevada resident for $60,000 in Nevada’s Federal District court for negligence (a state law civil suit).  Jim argues that the case should be dismissed for a lack of subject matter jurisdiction.  Is he right?  Under the circumstances, since Mike lives in Utah and Jim lives in Nevada then the type of subject matter jurisdiction that applies is diversity jurisdiction. Under...

    Civil procedure, Diversity jurisdiction, Jurisdiction 869  Words | 4  Pages

  • Hierarchy of Courts

    Explain the hierarchy of courts in Malaysia. Discuss in details. Law is defined as any system of regulations to govern the conduct of the people of a community, society or nation. It is the governmental response to society's need for both regularity, consistency and justice based upon collective human experience. A statute, ordinance, or regulation enacted by the legislative branch of a government and signed into law, or in some nations created by decree/judgement without any democratic process...

    Appeal, Court, Courts of England and Wales 1840  Words | 5  Pages

  • Federal Jurisdiction

    Federal Jurisdiction Abstract In this paper I will discuss a case involving Henry, a resident of Nevada, who sued Adam, a resident of Utah in the Federal Court in California. Henry sought $60,000 damages for personal injuries arising from an automobile accident that occurred in Los Angeles, California. I will answer the following questions about this case. Does the Federal Court have jurisdiction? What rules of procedure will...

    Appeal, Civil procedure, Common law 868  Words | 3  Pages

  • Subject Matter Jurisdiction

    Subject Matter Jurisdiction and Personal Jurisdiction Gregory Flink AIU Online Inside Subject Matter Jurisdiction and Personal Jurisdiction When analyzing the word jurisdiction, it is important to note how this word divides itself amongst two different categories: personal and subject matter jurisdiction. The main and most abstract difference between these two different types of jurisdictions is that personal jurisdiction authorizes the court to acquire personal jurisdiction over the parties...

    Civil procedure, Criminal law, In personam 1026  Words | 3  Pages

  • jurisdiction

    the state governments have its own particular court jurisdictions. Jurisdiction refers to a specific geographic region holding a characterized legitimate power. Case in point, the national government is a purview unto itself. Its force compasses the whole United States. Each one state is likewise a locale unto itself, with the ability to pass its own laws. More modest geographic territories, for example regions and urban areas, are independent locales to the degree that they have forces that are autonomous...

    Appeal, Crime, Criminal justice 876  Words | 3  Pages

  • Australian Court Hierarchy

    The term "Court Hierarchy" is a very important word in the law world in modern society. It's definition gives a very clear and concise meaning to the law industry. The phrase can be split into two words to be easily dealt and understood. The word "court" is from a Greek derivative "cohors" or "cohort" meaning courtyard or retinue. It's definition from the dictionary certainly portrays the law as a very important and distinguished practice. "a. A person or body of persons whose task is to hear and...

    Appeal, Court, Judge 1546  Words | 4  Pages

  • criminal procedure (courts jurisdiction)

    CRIMINAL PROCEDURE Jurisdiction Supreme Court Court of Appeals Sandiganbayan RTC MeTC, MTC, MCTC Original – Concurrent Exercise original jurisdiction over cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls. Exercise original jurisdiction over petitions for certiorari, prohibition, mandamus, quo warranto, and habeas corpus It shall exercise exclusive original jurisdiction to issue writs of mandamus, prohibition, certiorari, habeas corpus, and quo warranto, and auxiliary...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Court 928  Words | 5  Pages

  • Courts in Malaysia

    Introduction to Courts in Malaysia Summary There are generally two types of trials, criminal and civil. The hierarchy of courts begins from the Magistrates’ Court, Sessions Court, High Court, Court of Appeal, and finally, the Federal Court. The jurisdiction of the courts in civil or criminal matters are contained in theSubordinate Courts Act 1948 and the Courts of Judicature Act 1964. Article 121 of the Constitution provides for two High Courts of coordinate jurisdiction, the High Court in Malaya, and...

    Appeal, Court, Criminal law 1374  Words | 5  Pages

  • Court Systems Paper

    Court Systems Paper AJS/502 July 24, 2013 Bryan Cook University of Phoenix Court Systems Paper U.S. Courts: The Federal Judiciary The United States court system is composed of numerous sections of bodies of law that function together to ensure justness is served in fulfillment with the United States Constitution, federal, state and local laws. These organizations include law enforcement, the courts and, correction system all of which have a legitimate responsibility to maintain the American...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Court 1224  Words | 4  Pages

  • UK Court System

    Magistrates' courts All criminal cases start in a magistrates’ court. Cases are heard by either 2 or 3 magistrates and a district judge There isn’t a jury in a magistrates’ court. A magistrates’ court normally handles cases known as ‘summary offences’, eg: most motoring offences minor criminal damage being drunk and disorderly It can also deal with some of the more serious offences, eg: burglary drugs offences These are called ‘either way’ offences and can be heard either in a magistrates’ court or a Crown...

    Appeal, Court, Court of Appeal of England and Wales 575  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jury in court

    recognise that the early function of jury is very different form what it is today. The very first jury had acted as witness and provides information to the court. Later, Henry II changed the function of jury to one who deliberates on evidence. Slowly, the jury system mold into the system we have today. [1] The system by which we are familiar with today, i.e. juries giving verdicts on the basis of what is related to them by witnesses at the court hearing was coming into prominence in trials of serious offences...

    Common law, Court, Judge 1910  Words | 6  Pages

  • Contrast/Comparison of State and Federal Court Systems

    arbitration and then being sent a "Right to Sue" letter, the next step is to file a complaint with the court of jurisdiction. Dependant on what discrimination law the Right to Sue letter is used will depend on what court the complaint will be filed. State or Federal Court systems are two separate and distinct institutions and have different rules of law. Comparing Differences in State and Federal Court SystemsBeginning an Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) complaint is the only formal proceeding...

    Appeal, Judge, Law 1024  Words | 3  Pages

  • Answering a Clri/Els Question - Supreme Court

    CLRI/ELS Question - Supreme Court As promised today, let's consider a question from Common Law Reasoning and Institutions (as it is named on the University of London International Programmes Syllabus) or English Legal System as named by some other Universities' syllabus. This is a question previously posed on the University of London Internationl LLB Programme’s 2010 CLRI (ELS) Examination paper. It reads: "The role and functions of a court of appeal and a supreme court are different. The United...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Constitutionality 1097  Words | 4  Pages

  • Criminal Jurisdiction in Indian Country

    Criminal Jurisdiction in Indian Country Tribal nations enjoy a unique legal position in the United States attributable to their sovereign status with built in powers of self-government. They also enjoy a special relationship with the federal government. In turn, this status and relationship has consequences for tribes and their members; for the states and their citizens; and the federal government. This paper will explore the significance of tribal sovereignty, the tribal-federal trust relationship...

    Commerce Clause, President of the United States, Supreme Court of the United States 1358  Words | 5  Pages

  • Court Report

    1.1 The court visit and its general role in the English Legal system. The court visited was ‘Uxbridge Magistrates Court and Uxbridge Youth Court’, which is managed by the ministry of justice. The magistrates’ court is one of the courts at the lowest level of court hierarchy. It deals with offences with are regarded as less serious offences. Cases in the magistrates' courts are usually heard by a panel of magistrates (Justices of the Peace). This court must normally be composed of not more than three...

    Bail, Courts of England and Wales, English law 2163  Words | 6  Pages

  • Essay on State and Federal Court of Usa

    Differences between Federal and State Courts There are often good reasons to choose federal court over state court, or state court over federal court. Here are some of the considerations that lawyers and clients weigh when deciding one court over the other. The list is not all inclusive. Existence of Jurisdiction. Whether there is jurisdiction in either or both of the courts. Federal jurisdiction requires either a federal question and sometime a minimum dollar amount at issue or that there by...

    Appeal, Judge, Jurisdiction 2013  Words | 5  Pages

  • Mental Health Court

    Mental Health Court Mental Health Court 2013 By: Elizabeth Gavin Professor Contino Class: Corrections One 9/17/2013 2013 By: Elizabeth Gavin Professor Contino Class: Corrections One 9/17/2013 Mental health courts are a resource given to prisoners who would normally be put in prison if they had not decided to join this special program. Mental health court is a court run program by the district attorney’s office...

    Bench, Crime, Criminal justice 2330  Words | 6  Pages

  • Court Systems

    Court System Shukeyla Jones CJA/204 November 01, 2010 Maxine Craig Court System The modern dual system of courts incorporates both federal and state or local courts. This system is the product of many years of gradual development. Outside this formally established structure, however, personal relationships between key court participants can guide court proceedings and procedures. This paper will examine the history of the criminal courts, the dual system of the United States and modify the...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Bench 953  Words | 3  Pages

  • Court Structure

    Court structure, Federal Courts jurisdiction and State Courts involvement. Marilian Ramirez PL222 F12 Professor Q December 9, 2012 2 ABSTRACT. There are two types of courts in the United States Court systems. The reason for the United States to have a two court system is because the U.S Constitution set it that way under the governmental structure known as Federalism. This was created to provide that no power be higher than another and although the federal government is supreme in...

    Appeal, President of the United States, Supreme Court of the United States 921  Words | 4  Pages

  • Court Report

    COURT REPORT INFORMATION SHEET: All students are expected to attend a criminal court proceeding and to submit a report about their experience. This assessment item is due by 5pm Tuesday Week 8, so you need to make preparations to attend court as soon as possible. Note: Students who do not complete the required court reports will be awarded a grade of ‘fail incomplete’. It is recommended that you begin looking for appropriate hearings early in the semester so that you are not hampered by...

    Court, Court systems, Judge 1152  Words | 5  Pages

  • Court History and Purpose Paper

    Court History and Purpose Paper Valerie Wilson Court History and Purpose Paper A court is a place where justice is administered. It is a tribunal duly constituted for the hearing and determination of cases, and a session of a judicial assembly. The courts are here to settle disputes between parties. The purpose for the courts is to hear the defendant's cases and either rule to dismiss or sentence the defendant to some type of punishment. The defendant is given a chance to plead guilty...

    Federal government of the United States, Judge, Judiciary 926  Words | 3  Pages

  • Historical Development of the U.S Court Systems

    Historical Development of the U.S Court Systems CJA/490 University of Phoenix When the English were colonizing North America, they brought with them their laws. Being from the British Common Law system, the settlers understood how that system worked, so they modeled their own government using Common Law. In the 18th century, when the Union was formed and the colonies became states, they kept their Common Law governments. However, the Articles...

    Appellate court, President of the United States, State court 1286  Words | 4  Pages

  • Court System Paper

    Court System Paper Ally A. Robertson CJA/204 July 22, 2010 Mr. Todd Larson Court System Paper Describe the major historical developments of the U.S. courts. There are two judicial systems; first one is the state and local courts established under the authority of state governments. Federal courts system is the other that was created by Congress under the authority of the U.S constitution. General agreement...

    Court, Criminal justice, Judge 1164  Words | 4  Pages

  • United States Court Systems

    United States Court Systems This report is designed to give an overview of both the United States Court system and the Michigan State Court system. It will discuss each system individually and explain each court and general knowledge about that court. It will explore the similarities and differences between the 2 court systems and what the requirements are to determine in which court system cases should be heard. The Federal Courts The Federal Court system is comprised of 3 different tiers...

    Court, State court, Supreme Court of the United States 1084  Words | 4  Pages

  • The use of Precendent in the Irish Courts

    whereby courts will follow earlier relevant decisions is referred to as 'Precedent'. It is a feature of both Civil and Common Law systems but in the case of common law systems Precedent, encapsulated in the principle of 'Stare Decisis' (let the decision stand), has a greater significance. In the following pages I will consider the nature of Precedent, its benefits, the pre-requisites for its implementation and its limitations. I will also examine the use of Precedent in the Irish Courts. In...

    Case law, Common law, Court 1838  Words | 7  Pages

  • Hierarchy Court

    CHAPTER 1 THE COURT STRUCTURE - The present court structure has been in effect since June 1994 following the Constitution (Amendment) Act 1994. - The judicial powers are exercised by the Subordinate Courts and the superior courts organised in a hierarchy where the Subordinate Courts are at the lower level and the superior courts at the higher level. THE SUBORDINATE COURTS (The Subordinate Courts Act 1948) THE PENGHULU’S COURT - The Penghulu’s Court is presided over by a Penghulu who has...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Court 1427  Words | 5  Pages

  • Court Issues Analysis

    Court Issues Analysis Harun Williams CJA/394 January 23, 2013 Frank Juarez Court Issues Analysis In discussions regarding court system issues, most tend to forget that crimes would not happen if there were proper societal values in place and those values were enforced. Society has shifted from a culture of marriage, family values and strong familiar bonds to a culture that cultivates a staggering divorce rate, single mothers with many children born out of wedlock with little to no income...

    Bench, Court, Crime 1269  Words | 4  Pages

  • Fedral Court System in India

    powers between the Centre and the Provinces required the balance to avoid the disputes which would be arisen between the constituent units and the Federation. The system of Federation clearly demanded the creation of a Federal Court which would have jurisdiction over the States as well as the Provinces. Federal Court functioned only for 12 years. It was the highest Court in India. Over it, there was Privy Council. But to approach the Privy Council required huge expenses to the litigants’ Hence the...

    Article Three of the United States Constitution, Chief Justice of the United States, Court 829  Words | 3  Pages

  • Universal jurisdiction

    international crimes Jurisdiction is one the legal terms that must be used with extreme caution. Most generally jurisdiction is understood as the power of the State to regulate affairs pursuant to its laws.1 Controversial issues may arise when offence assumes international aspect which can cause conflict between jurisdictions of the countries. In each of the preceding bases of jurisdiction there must be a material link between the state asserting jurisdiction and the crime. That is what distinguishes the...

    Crime, Criminal law, Genocide 1960  Words | 5  Pages

  • Court System

    basic role of the Canadian court system is to deliver justice between two individuals or two individuals and the state. There are four levels of court in Canada. Provincial courts are the lowest in terms of power. They handle most of the day to day cases. The next court in terms of power is the provincial and territorial superior courts. These courts take care of the more serious crimes that are admitted into the system, and can also take appeals from provincial court judgments. Another that has...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Court 1476  Words | 4  Pages

  • Roles Of Law And Courts In Today S Business Environment

    to and must abide by the federal and state courts and laws of this country. The judicial review is the doctrine under which legislative and executive actions are subject to review by the judiciary. This is an example of check and balances in a modern governmental system. Working on a federal installation (Tinker AFB) the industry has to follow both federal guidelines and laws. Federal and State Court Structure The differences between the two court structures: The United States Constitution...

    Judge, Law, President of the United States 901  Words | 5  Pages

  • What was the consitutional issue in Brandy V HREOC, what did the court decide? What broader implications does it have?

    Commission challenges the constitutional validity of the scheme for the enforcement of Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (HREOC) determination under the Racial Discrimination Act 1975 (Cth). The High Court of Australia had decided that since HREOC was not constituted as a court according to Chapter III of the Constitution, and therefore was not able to exercise judicial power of commonwealth and enforce any subsequent decisions. The Constitution is divided into separate chapters dealing...

    Constitution, Executive, Human rights 1431  Words | 5  Pages

  • Court System

    A court system is created to determine the innocent and the guilty when a conflict arises. In many cases it is convicting a criminal for a crime that has been committed. The system entitles everyone to a fair trial no matter what the case and in each trial it is the team that is prosecuting that most prove that if the accused is guilty. Not the accused having to prove their innocence. The victim in most cases looks to see that justice is served to the criminal. The accused looks to try and get another...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Court 1635  Words | 5  Pages

  • Juvenile Jurisdiction “vs” Adult Jurisdiction

    JUVENILE JURISDICTION “VS” ADULT JURISDICTION A. Banks Introduction to Criminal Justice –CRN 21737 December 12, 2012 Juvenile Jurisdiction v. Adult Jurisdiction This paper explores the different views that have been in debate among society and the juvenile justice system. Since the inception of juvenile court more than a hundred years ago, the underlying debate has been that juvenile offenders shouldn’t go through the adult criminal courts. Juvenile court was originally created to handle...

    Crime, Criminal justice, Criminal law 1493  Words | 5  Pages

  • What Is a Reactive Attitude? What Bearing Does It Have on the Problem of Free Will?

    What is a reactive attitude? What bearing does it have on the problem of free will? A theory that has attacked the validity of discussions on freedom in modern philosophy is determinism. In these discussions, questions have arisen as to how the truth or falsity of this theory should affect our lives. In this essay I will discuss the formal implications, illustrated by Peter Strawson, that come about from this. This will mean discussion of our reactive attitudes on: our moral considerations and...

    Free will, P. F. Strawson, Ted Honderich 1904  Words | 5  Pages

  • Juvenile and Adult Courts

    Juvenile and Adult Courts: A Comparative Analysis Zanetta Eave, Tasha Harris, and Lee Blackmon CJA/374 July 29, 2013 Cory Kelly Introduction The “Juvenile and Adult Courts: A Comparative Analysis” paper will compare juvenile courts with adult courts. This paper will present an overview of the juvenile justice system, a point-by-point comparison between juvenile and adult courts. The adjudication process by which a juvenile is transferred to the adult court system. This paper will also discuss...

    Court, Crime, Criminology 1736  Words | 5  Pages

  • Juvenile Court

    confidential. For a juvenile to have there file sealed they have to request it from the court.  Most get probation with circumstances like community service, counseling or drug treatment. We have to look at juveniles differently than we do adults because of their developmental progress. Every juvenile officer who goes through training becomes knowledgeable about the juvenile developmental process. Research of court procedures in the state of Nevada for juveniles offenders who have not yet reached 18 years...

    Civil procedure, Court, Crime 1898  Words | 4  Pages

  • Courts: Fiction vs. Reality

    many people have said they learned medical techniques by watching medical shows on television or believe they would know what to do in a medical emergency because they have seen it done on television. The same goes for Americans’ knowledge about Court hearings and the judicial system. Many things are done on television by actors playing lawyers or judges that are done just for the purpose of entertainment. “Reality-based” Court shows such as Judge Judy, People’s Court and Divorce Court dominate television...

    Attorney at law, Bench, Common law 1234  Words | 4  Pages

  • Different Types of Courts in India

    Different types of Courts in India Indian Judiciary is the continuation of the British Legal system established by the English in the mid-19th century based on a typical hybrid legal system in which customs, precedents and legislative law have validity of law. Constitution of India is the supreme authority of the country. There are various levels of judiciary in India — different types of courts have different styles of judges. They also form a strict hierarchy of importance, in line with the order...

    Appeal, Court, India 1251  Words | 4  Pages

  • What is the Law and how do Ethics interact? Exxon Valdez – Continuing Case

    Many years ago, Raymond Baumhart the greatest sociologist questioned organization people, "What does ethics mean to the business world?" Some people believe that Ethics is a kind of feeling which would give the knowledge about right or wrong situation on the basis of religious beliefs. While other argues the prior view admitting that it simply the level of behaviour society accepts and the law requires. “Ethics is a study of moral standards whose explicit purpose is to determine as far as possible...

    Business ethics, Ethics, Exxon Valdez 848  Words | 3  Pages

  • Is the Establishment of the Caribbean Court of Justice a Sound Move for Caricom? If so, Why Has It Not Been Adopted by More Caricom States

    The question must be asked firstly, not what if the establishment of the Caribbean Court of Justice is a sound move but what exactly is the Caribbean Court of Justice. As many perceive the CCJ as it is commonly referred to, would be a replacement to the previous Privy Council; which was and still is in some Caribbean states the last court of appeal. The Privy Council is considered to be one of the oldest institutions of government. “It has many roles which include giving advice on the exercise of...

    Barbados, Caribbean, Caribbean Community 1800  Words | 5  Pages

  • hong kong court jurisdiction

    Number 1426 12 November 2012 Client Alert Latham & Watkins Litigation Department Jurisdiction of the Hong Kong Courts re Winding Up and Unfair Prejudice Petitions — Are Offshore Companies Safe? Hong Kong law contains a number of provisions designed to protect the interests of minority shareholders, including the “unfair prejudice” remedies under section 168A of the Companies Ordinance (the Ordinance) and the Ordinance’s “just and equitable” winding-up provisions. These protections...

    Shareholder 1743  Words | 9  Pages

  • Juvenile Drug Courts

    Drug Courts came about as a result of a backlogged court system and a steady, rapidly increasing prison population. Drug courts are a form of diversion that helps the offender through rehabilitation and the community through an increased sense of protection, which serves the best interest of everyone. Drug Courts are community based intermediate sanctions that incorporate treatment principles into the Criminal Justice System and divert drug offenders from traditional punishments of probation and...

    Court, Crime, Criminal justice 1910  Words | 5  Pages

  • Establishment of High Court in India

    Indian High Courts Act 1861 – The Indian High Courts Act was passed by the British Parliament on the 6th August, 1861 and was titled as an act for establishing high courts of judicature in India. This legislation contained only 19 sections only. Its main function was to abolish the supreme courts and the Sadar Adalats in the three Presidencies and to establish the high courts in their place. The records and document of the various courts became the records and documents of the High Court concerned...

    Appeal, Civil procedure, Court 1927  Words | 7  Pages

  • Juvenile and Adult Courts: A Comparative Analysis.

    robberies, and rapes that have been committed by juveniles. The Juvenile Court with Adult Court is different and similar in the criminal justice system. A look at the juvenile history in 1643 a sixteen year old boy was put to death for sodomizing a cow. Today many states disagree in the execution of juveniles. In the present day the increasing violence, both juvenile and adult system has changed over the years (Simmons 2002). The juvenile philosophy in juvenile courts was to offer the youth an...

    Court, Crime, Criminal justice 1823  Words | 7  Pages

  • The Court System in Jamaica

    A court is a tribunal or governmental institution with the authority to adjudicate legal disputes between parties and carry out administration of justice in civil, criminal and administrative matters. The legal tradition prominent in the Commonwealth Caribbean is that of the common law tradition, which originated in England, the court system of the territories is also influenced by tradition. The courts in the region are modeled on those of England. The power to create and regulate such court systems...

    Appeal, Appellate court, Court 1271  Words | 4  Pages

  • Hierarchy of the Court system- Law

    Hierarchy of the Court System Civil Case Mr Van Persie (Robin Van Persie- Manchester United and Holland Footballer) I am aware that you are in need of some legal help regarding a dispute that you have with The Sun newspaper. I am more than willing to help you win this case and make sure that justice will be served to you. Before I fight this case I will need to explain to you what the case will be based on, what may happen and I will also consult you about the different types of legal personnel...

    Court, Courts of England and Wales, Criminal law 1845  Words | 5  Pages

  • contempt of court

    CONTEMPT OF COURT Introduction: In a democracy people should have right to criticize judges. The purpose of should not be to upheld the majesty and dignity of the court but only to enable it to function. Anything that curtails or impairs the freedom of limits of the judicial proceedings must of necessity result in hampering of the administration of Law and in interfering with the due course of justice. This necessarily constitutes contempt of court. Oswald defines contempt to be...

    Bench, Common law, Contempt of court 2451  Words | 7  Pages

  • Court Systems

    determined we should have a country that operated differently and more effectively than the one left behind in the days of British control. They decided that states should have the power to make and govern their own laws and also the ability to enforce those laws. This did not eliminate the need for federal court systems, however, and so the dual court system was born. The dual court system is the formal name for the way our country's legal system works. The dual courts it refers to are the federal...

    Law, President of the United States, Supreme Court of the United States 1096  Words | 3  Pages

  • Courts in Today’s Pop Culture

    fictional characters. For example, many people have said they learned about forensic techniques by watching the “C.S.I.” shows on television. They firmly believe that can assist in an actual criminal investigation because they have seen “experts” on television handle similar situations. This same belief extends to Americans’ knowledge about the law and the judicial system of the nation. There are many things that fictional accounts of lawyers, judges, and courts confuse, muddle or simply make-up to meet...

    Attorney at law, Common law, Court 1338  Words | 4  Pages

  • Final Project-Personal Code of Ethics

    Final Project: Personal Code of Ethics Juvenile Probation Officers and Parole Agents require much patience as well as the ability to follow certain orderly conduct. Officers are given a group of individuals to monitor on a daily basis that are also known as caseloads. Each caseload is different for every officer. The juvenile(s) involved have unique behavioral patterns and backgrounds that construct the outcome of how each case may proceed. Therefore, it is required that all officers follow the...

    Business ethics, Criminal law, Ethics 1795  Words | 5  Pages

  • What is a Trademark?

    TRADEMARKS What is a Trademark A TRADEMARK is a word, phrase, symbol or design, or combination of words, phrases, symbols or designs is used in the course of trade which identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods or services of one enterprise from those of others. A trademark is different from a copyright or a patent or geographical indication. A copyright protects an original artistic or literary work; a patent protects an invention whereas a geographical indication is used to identify...

    Brand, Certification mark, Passing off 1323  Words | 4  Pages

  • Court History and Purpose

    Court History and Purpose CJA/224 June 3rd, 2012 Court History and Purpose The court system in America is nothing short of new. In fact, the court system dates back to the early 1600’s with the first colonies in Jamestown. The early settlers may have not known it then but the start of the court system in Jamestown was very important in determining our courts today. In our current dual court system model, this was decided long ago by the settlers, and this model has survived...

    Common law, Judge, Jury 1221  Words | 3  Pages

  • ‘Judicial Precedent Is Best Understood as a Practice of the Courts and Not as a Set of Binding Rules. as a Practice It Could Be Refined or Changed by the Courts as They Wish.’ Discuss

    of the English courts, a decision of a higher court will be binding on a court lower that is in that hierarchy. In general terms this means that when judges try cases they will check to see if a similar situation has come before a court previously. If the precedent was set by a court of equal or higher status to the court deciding the new case, then the judge in the present case should follow the rule of law established in the earlier case. Where the precedent is from a lower court in the hierarchy...

    Case law, Common law, High Court of Justice 2223  Words | 7  Pages

  • Court Organization and Administration

    18, 2012 Court Organization and Administration would be the first problem to address. The reason for this to be the first is because it’s so important to have the courts and administration all on one accord. Courts are highly regulated organizations, adhering to a set of abstract rules and procedures set forth in either civil rules of procedure or criminal rules of procedure. There is a dual court system in the U.S. This dual court system consists of federal courts and state courts. Within both...

    Appellate court, Bench, Court 2067  Words | 5  Pages

  • Court Issue Analysis

    Court Issues Analysis CJA/394 January 3, 2013 Court Issues Analysis As society changes, the criminal justice system must also change. As the criminal justice system changes it is important to identify areas of the court system that needs changes. Portions of the court system facing changes are the way courts are managed including their problems and resolutions. Victim’s rights have emerged as a new trend in the courts as victims are given the rights to...

    Bench, Court, Dispute resolution 1255  Words | 4  Pages

  • Court Report

    Court Report 1. Which court did you attend and what was the date of your attendance? 2. What kind of hearing did you attend? I attended a sentencing in Beenleigh district court, before the sentencing there were a string of mentions that I also watched to deepen my understanding of the courtroom and the roles of the people there. 3. What were the charges against the defendant? Were these summary or indictable offences? How did you know this? The defendant was charged with three indictable...

    Court, Crime, Criminal justice 1902  Words | 6  Pages

  • Courts Real vs Fiction

    many things from fictional characters. For example, many persons have said they learned CPR by watching medical shows on television or believe they can assist in a medical emergency because they have seen “experts” on television handle similar situations. This same belief extends to Americans’ knowledge about the law and the judicial system of the nation. There are many things that fictional accounts of lawyers, judges, and courts confuse or create simply to meet the needs of the fiction or make...

    Attorney at law, Bench, Common law 1613  Words | 4  Pages

  • Supreme Court

    Nature’s Judicial Process in the Supreme Court consists of decision-making; based on the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court. Although the Supreme Court has the capability to decide all extended cases; it also has the power to ascend under the Constitution, which allows the Supreme Court its jurisdiction in the Judicial Branch of government. The Judicial Process interpret the laws that are established in the Supreme Court; thus, allowing the Court to exercise its power by shifting its system under...

    Brown v. Board of Education, Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, Gideon v. Wainwright 1162  Words | 3  Pages

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