"Sociocultural Theory" Essays and Research Papers

  • Sociocultural Theory

    GROUP GENLITES A. SOCIO-CULTURAL THEORY (SOFTCOPY) MEMBERS: RECUERDO, JEMMELYN U. TABLEZO, ELVIE P. LEONOR, ABEGAIL Q. CALUMBA, MARIA ELIZABETH What Is Sociocultural TheorySociocultural theory is an emerging theory in psychology that looks at the important contributions that society makes to individual development. This theory stresses the interaction between developing people and the culture in which they live. Sociocultural theory grew from the work of seminal psychologist...

    Child development, Developmental psychology, Jean Piaget 2727  Words | 9  Pages

  • Vgotsky’s Sociocultural Theory

    Vgotsky’s Sociocultural Theory Lev Semenovich Vygotsky was born in 1896 in Tsarist, Russia to a middle class Jewish family. At that time there were very strict rules on where Jewish people could live, work, and how many people could be educated. Vygotsky was privately tutored in his younger years and was fortunate enough to be admitted into Moscow University through a Jewish lottery. His parents insisted that he apply for the Medical school but almost immediately upon starting at Moscow University...

    Child development, Developmental psychology, Jean Piaget 2201  Words | 6  Pages

  • Unipolar Depression’s Etiology by Sociocultural, Psychodynamic and Behavioral

     Dominick Tammara Unipolar Depression’s Etiology by Sociocultural, Psychodynamic and Behavioral Theories Unipolar depression is a psychological disorder which has seen a surge in the last 50 years. It has been discussed in numerous works of art, and has even become a public health issue because of its prevalence. Evidently, this psychological condition is complicated, and diminishes performance in many areas. Due to the fact that it has been reaching epidemic proportions, it has become a mayor...

    Behaviorism, Major depressive disorder, Psychoanalysis 1570  Words | 5  Pages

  • Modernization Theory

    MODERNIZATION THEORY Introduction: Modernization is an inherently optimistic concept for it assumes that all countries eventually experience economic growth. This optimistic must be understood in the historical context of post war prosperity and growth in the north and independence of many southern colonies along with the growth of national markets and trades. The theory of modernization turns out into the high mass consumption and urbanization. The theory of economic growth is an alternative...

    Anthropology, Capitalism, Émile Durkheim 1266  Words | 4  Pages

  • Modernization Theory

    Modernization Theory Modernization theory is a theory that explains the process of improvement from an older culture to the newest one as well as explains the changing ways of communication and media use in traditional and postmodern societies. The theory takes into consideration factors from a certain place with the assumption that traditional places can be developed to the most recent manners. Modernization theory does not only stress there to be a change but also response to that change. It...

    Crime, Economics, Globalization 989  Words | 4  Pages

  • Modernisation Theory

    a 'pre-modern' or 'traditional' to a 'modern' society. Modernization theory is used to explain the process of modernization that a nation goes through as it transitions from a traditional society to a modern one. The theory looks at the internal factors of a country while assuming that, with assistance, "traditional" countries can be brought to development in the same manner more developed countries have. Modernisation theory also attempts to identify the social variables that contribute to social...

    Development, Modernization, Sociocultural evolution 2248  Words | 6  Pages

  • Modernization Theory

    Modernization Theory According to Macionis (2010), the definition of modernization theory “is a model of economic and social development that explains global inequality in terms of technological and cultural differences between nations”. Modernization theory is a description, explanation, and account of the way of traditional and under established or underdeveloped societies, compared to more modern societies. Modernization is one of the most important perspectives in development and...

    Economic growth, Modernization, Society 866  Words | 3  Pages

  • Sociocultural Aspects of Maternal and Child Health Nursing

    CHAPTER 2 : Sociocultural Aspects of Maternal and Child Health Nursing Key Terms : Culture : is a view of the world and a set of traditions that a specific social group uses and transmits to the next generation. Cultural Values : are preferred ways of acting based on traditions . Cultural values are formed early in life and strongly influence the manner in which people plan for childbearing and childrearing , as well as they respond to health and wellness ( Whitler and Kirmayer, 2008) Ethnicity...

    Acculturation, Anthropology, Culture 1120  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory of social evolution

    Lewis Henry Morgan (November 21, 1818 – December 17, 1881) was a pioneering American anthropologist and social theorist who worked as a railroad lawyer. He is best known for his work on kinship and social structure, his theories of social evolution, and his ethnography of the Iroquois. Interested in what holds societies together, he proposed the concept that the earliest human domestic institution was the matrilineal clan, not the patriarchal family; the idea was accepted by most pre-historians...

    Anthropology, Friedrich Engels, Karl Marx 894  Words | 3  Pages

  • THEORIES OF THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

    Society I. What is the Information Society? II. Reasons of the coming of the age of the IS III. Development of the IS B. Theories of the Information Society I. The medium is the message and Global Village (Marshall – 1960s) II. Post- Industrial Society (Daniel Bell) and Third wave (Alvin Toffler) III. Network society C. Effects D. Conclusion THEORIES OF THE INFORMATION SOCIETY A. The coming of the age of the Information Society I. What is the Information Society? Information...

    Economy, Information society, Information technology 1181  Words | 5  Pages

  • Theories

    Motivation theories can be classified broadly into two different perspectives: Content and Process theories. Content Theories deal with “what” motivates people and it is concerned with individual needs and goals. Maslow, Alderfer, Herzberg and McCelland studied motivation from a “content” perspective. Process Theories deal with the “process” of motivation and is concerned with “how” motivation occurs. Vroom, Porter & Lawler, Adams and Locke studied motivation from a “process” perspective. 1. Content...

    Abraham Maslow, Expectancy theory, Fundamental human needs 1835  Words | 7  Pages

  • The Comparison of Sociocultural Theory

    The comparison of sociocultural theory to Piaget’s developmental model Any new theory of human development requires analysis; how it goes about testing its concepts and how it compares with other contemporary theories within the same field. Conforming to these requirements allow the merits, place and role of the theory being analysed to become much clearer. Furthermore, this approach can sometimes throw further light on previously analysed theory and often provide a deeper understanding of it...

    Child development, Constructivism, Developmental psychology 5657  Words | 19  Pages

  • My Theory

    Theories of personality There are many different theories of personality, Type theories, Psychodynamic theories,Trait theories, Humanist theories and finally Behavioral theories. If i had to create my own theory of personality it will be very similar to Freud's Stages of Psychosexual Development. Simply because I also agree that the personality mainly develops during childhood. I also believe that individuals have motives behind every action which he describes as "the driving force behind behavior"...

    Behaviorism, Developmental psychology, Libido 2123  Words | 6  Pages

  • administrative theory

    ADMINISTRATIVE THEORY: Theory means a formal statement of rules on which a subject of study is based or ideas which are suggested to explain a fact or an event or,more generally, an opinion or explanation. Administrative theory consist of those concets given by experienced administrators or obseervation of the operational situations in administration,they may be divided from comparative studies or they maybe ideas and opinions of intellectuals. Administrative theories are those...

    Bureaucracy, Human behavior, Management 881  Words | 3  Pages

  • Behavior Theory and Narritive Theory Compared

    This paper will compare behavior theory and narrative theory. It will cover the key concepts, the practice process, and the major interventions of each theory. An application of each theory will be included. This paper also contains a practice case and a set of illustrations using both theories for this practice case. Practice Case Using Behavioral and Narrative theories Susanne Langston University of New England ...

    Behavior, Behaviorism, Classical conditioning 1634  Words | 6  Pages

  • Theories and Hypotheses

     Theories and Hypotheses: The Differences and Similarities Abstract This paper is an examination of theories and hypotheses, their differences and similarities. The four major types of theories studied are Deductive, Inductive, Grounded and Axiomatic. Each type of theories is introduced and explained. Additionally, a hypothesis is defined in relation to a theory, and the key differences between the two explained. The variables which exist between...

    Crime, Empiricism, Experiment 2025  Words | 5  Pages

  • Accounting theory

    ACCOUNTING THEORY AND PRACTICE TUTORIAL 1 - Semester 2 2014 Deegan Topic 1: Introduction to financial accounting theory QUESTION 1 - Question 1.8: What is the difference between developing a theory by induction and developing a theory by deduction? As explained in this chapter, theory that is developed through induction is developed as a result of undertaking a series of observations of particular events, and on the basis of these observations, a theory is developed. Early theories of accounting...

    Financial statements, Hypothesis, International Accounting Standards Board 1732  Words | 5  Pages

  • Theory Research

    Chapter IV: Theories in Scientific Research Theories- are explanations of natural or social behaviour, event or phenomenon. Scientific Theory- is a system of constructs (concepts) and propositions (relationship between those constructs). It presents a logical, systematic and coherent explanations of a phenomenon of interest. Theories should explain why things happen rather than describe or predict. Prediction requires “correlations” while Explanations require “causations” or understanding the...

    Explanation, Hypothesis, Logic 538  Words | 3  Pages

  • Criminological Theory

    Personal Criminological Theory: What Causes Crime? April Cox CJA/540 Criminological Theory October 3, 2011 Angela Williams Personal Criminological Theory: What Causes Crime? Over the centuries of time various scientists have tried to explain the reasons behind the causes associated with crime and criminal behavior. Dozens of theories have been argued both for and against one another to address the question as to what causes individuals to commit crime. The goal of this paper...

    Crime, Crime statistics, Criminal justice 1137  Words | 4  Pages

  • Psychodynamic Theories

    Personality Overview Paper The study of human personality has numerous theories. When looking at the differences of these theories, one can not help but wonder if the theories are a representation of the individual who developed them. There is also a question of variances based on geographical and time of which these theories were developed. Researchers gain a basic knowledge and understanding based on scientific research and current theories of the time. Combined with the personality of the individual, and...

    Behavior, Behaviorism, Personality psychology 1054  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory Analysis

    Notes The ultimate goal of theory evaluation is to determine the potential of the theory to scientific knowledge. Hardy • Theory evaluation: o meaningful and logical adequacy o Operational and empirical adequacy o Testability o Generality o Contribution to understanding o Predictability o Pragmatic adequacy Logical adequacy (diagramming) - identifying all theoretical terms (concepts, constructs, operational definitions, referents). Theory is a set of interrelated concepts and statements ...

    Difference, Empiricism, Falsifiability 710  Words | 3  Pages

  • Alderian Theory

    Abstract This paper will discuss how the Adlerian theory reflects my personal values and beliefs as it relates to the practice of counseling as a clinician. Adlerian Theory and My Style After reading the three assigned theories the Adlerian theory more closely matched my personal values and beliefs. I selected the population that I currently work to be my current clients to be the basis of my paper. In my present job, the population served is clients with children that currently excused...

    Alfred Adler, Concept, Personal life 812  Words | 3  Pages

  • Staples Theory

    Question: Focus on one particular Political Economy Theory studied during the Course and apply it to the economic history of Canada. Criticize and/or Support its explanatory power and suggest possible avenues to improve the theoretical framework? To understand, the history of Canada economically, it is important to examine the reasons why the country’s economy formed into its present form. The Staples theory is the most appropriate theory to use when looking into the economic history...

    Economic history of Canada, Economics, Economy 2405  Words | 7  Pages

  • The Conflict Theory

    Paul Wise The Conflict Theory This paper will talk about what The Conflict Theory is, and who it was derived from. It will also give, and explain an example of what The Conflict Theory pertains to in modern society. The Conflict Theory focuses on the negative aspects of society as opposed to most other theories which tend to focus more on the positive aspects of society. It pays more attention to things like race, gender and social class because they are seen as grounds for the worst struggles...

    Karl Marx, Marxism, Proletariat 895  Words | 3  Pages

  • Management Theory

    Meaning 11-25-2006 This paper will compare and contrast a selected foundational philosophy of management theory to that of a more modern one. The comparison will entail a personal understanding of the evolution of management thought as it is represented in the philosophies under analysis. Personal view would indicate or relate the thought that “I believe that the task of any theory of managing is to produce generalizations that are actionable by managers in everyday life and that as managers...

    Business, Management, Organization 1157  Words | 4  Pages

  • Crime Theories

    Crime Theories Jaime Morris Professor Al CIS170-Wk.4Ass.2 11/04/12 Digital crimes are believed to be caused by different types of theories. The Strain theory could be the cause of digital crimes because the strain of everyday life. The Strain theory is a sociological theory. The strain of an individual’s everyday life is causing people to “give in” to the pressures in society. Some of these individuals feel that they can’t survive without crime. Strains such as peer pressure...

    Crime, Criminology, Economics 770  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theory of Personality

    My Theory of Personality While studying the theories given by scholars such as Freud, Adler, and Horney, one cannot help but forming an opinion of what is right and what is wrong. During class, I would see flashes of things and think, “wow, that actually sounds correct to me”, but there were many other times when I found myself disagreeing or sometimes snickering at the ridiculous of some theories. Weighing each theory studied, I believe I have found different parts of each psychologist that creates...

    Carl Jung, Morality, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator 1466  Words | 4  Pages

  • Management Theory

    “Nothing is so Quite so Practical as a good Theory” (Van de Ven 1989). In general a theory creates an image of reality or an aperture of reality. A theory contains a descriptive and explanatory (causal) say about this part of the reality. On this basis become deflect predict and recommended action. Theories are linked most of the time with the claim to be able to check through observations (e.g. by means of experiments). Classical management theory was introduced in the late 19th century during...

    Authority, Charismatic authority, Henri Fayol 1862  Words | 8  Pages

  • Theories of Punishment

    On Criminal Law–Theories of Punishment July 22, 2009 In my criminal law class at law school, we discussed four basic theories of “why we punish”: deterrence (“to keep them from doing it”), incarceration (“to keep those who do it away from us”), rehabilitation (“to help them stop doing it”), and retribution (“because they deserve it”). Any punishment should fall in line with your basic theory of punishment. It seems to me that each theory of punishment, when applied and examined, ends up needing...

    Crime, Criminal law, Criminology 1078  Words | 3  Pages

  • Contingency Theory

    structure, its size, its technology, and the requirements of its environment. This perspective is known as "contingency theory" and contrasts with the perspective of classical theorists like Weber, Taylor, Fayol, etc. who thought that there probably was one way to run organizations that was the best. Critics assert that no cohesive contingency theory exists, that "contingency theory" is a collection of different ideas that represent a contingency approach, which research does not validate because...

    Environment, Environmentalism, Management 1189  Words | 4  Pages

  • Accounting Theories

    “The theories we use to help us understand standard-setting in national arenas (such as Australia) don't work so well at the international level where the . . . International Accounting Standard Board (IASB) is taking a leading role. We will have to modify them or expand our theoretical repertoire” Discuss the above statement, clearly indicating your agreement or otherwise about the basis for your views. Abstract: The theories that are presented in this paper all assume the importance of a...

    Australia, Financial Accounting Standards Board, International Accounting Standards Board 2543  Words | 7  Pages

  • Theories of Motivation

    forces that lie beneath motivation can be biological, social, emotional or cognitive in nature. My research and studying helped me understand a number of different theories to explain motivation or sight an example. Each individual theory tends to be rather limited in scope. However, by looking at the key ideas behind each theory, I have gained a better understanding of motivation as a whole. Based from keen observation, people tend to avoid imminent danger when they feel so. In the animal kingdom...

    Behavior, Fundamental human needs, Human behavior 1569  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theories of Crime

    Theories of Crime: Comparisons and Contrasts Cheryl Diana Drake Everest University Phoenix The causes of crime are still really not known. There are many different theories and perspectives on why crime exists. However, even with all of the studies and perspectives on crimes committed, it appears to me that the causes of crime are only speculative. Biological Theory The biological theories primarily study the physical constitution and endocrinology. They are a very good example of the theories...

    Cesare Lombroso, Crime, Criminology 901  Words | 3  Pages

  • Research and Theories

    Research and Theories Terrie Gill Unit 1 IP Dear, Police Captain; To start off I would just like to give thanks for my opportunity to join you in your work. As an expert in the Criminal Justice Field, I would like to share my expertise to help you determine a solution to your new citywide crime prevention strategy. The four areas of research theories that I would like to review are deductive, inductive, grounded, and axiomatic. The first thing I am going to do is give a generalization of...

    Crime, Criminology, Deductive reasoning 1427  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theories of Helping

    Theories of Helping Theories of Helping The main reason for an annotated bibliography gives the reader a brief overview of an article or journal without reading the whole thing. The purpose of analysis of the annotation should give the reader a short analysis of the source. Annotated bibliography helps in research because the researcher can get a quick glimpse of the subject at hand and determined if the subject written has anything in common with want the researcher wants, without wasting a...

    Annotated bibliography, Annotation, Empathy 902  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theories of Immigration

    Theories of International Migration: A Review and Appraisal Author(s): Douglas S. Massey, Joaquin Arango, Graeme Hugo, Ali Kouaouci, Adela Pellegrino, J. Edward Taylor Source: Population and Development Review, Vol. 19, No. 3 (Sep., 1993), pp. 431-466 Published by: Population Council Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2938462 Accessed: 04/11/2010 19:16 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms...

    Economics, Human migration, Immigration 1668  Words | 7  Pages

  • Personality Theories

    Personality Theories PSYCH/504 Personality Theories There are many different theorists regarding personality along with many theories. Each of these theories comes about because of different research methods. In this paper I will discuss what is personality?, what psychologists’ goals are, and the different types of research along with their strengths and weaknesses. Personality is one of the most theorized and most researched aspects of psychology. To understand personality, one must first...

    Evaluation methods, Experiment, Personality psychology 1094  Words | 4  Pages

  • Accounting Theory

    480). Required: Discuss the extent to which the “scientific” world-view of mainstream accounting researchers, is grounded on a belief that “reality” exists independently of thee human subject and the possible implications this has for accounting theory development. Introduction Accounting is a subject that is guided with principles and regulations. Thus, it is often regarded as a rigid, rigorous, and highly analytical discipline with very precise interpretations. However, this is far from the...

    Epistemology, Humanities, Methodology 1573  Words | 8  Pages

  • Cct 20 Years of Research

    ERIC J. ARNOULD and CRAIG J. THOMPSON Consumer Culture Theory (CCT): Twenty Years of Research Past 20 years: Flurry of Research and studies abot aspects of consumption. CCT presents a non-exhaustive overview about consumption and marketplace behavior: A family of theoretical perspectives that address the dynamic relationships between consumer actions, the marketplace, and cultural meanings. Culture is not seen as a homogenous system of collective meanings, way of life and unified values (...

    Cultural anthropology, Culture, Globalization 884  Words | 3  Pages

  • Schema Theory

    Vaishnavi Mamillapalle Psychology HL Mr. Wilcox Schema Essay December 9th, 2012   Schema Theory             Schemas are mental representation of knowledge built through experiences from people, situation or object.  Schema Theory is divided into three stages to get a better understanding of the memory processes which are “1. Encoding- Transforming sensory information to meaningful memory 2. Storage- Creates a biological trace of the memory, which is either consolidated or lost 3. Retrieval-...

    Cognition, Cognitive neuroscience, Cognitive psychology 1052  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theories of Myths

    Theories of Myth Heaven Sherrill Hum/105 January 29, 2010 Lisa Kealer-Carver Theories of myth and creation myths, how do they work together? That is what I will discuss in this paper. Unlike most papers, where you do a lot of research and have a few scholarly references, in this one I will base my information form the text book readings alone. In the beginning of studying myths, I asked myself, “What is a myth”? A myth is an ancient narrative; a word; a story; it is not static artifacts...

    Christian mythology, Comparative mythology, Human 720  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theory of Knowledge

    pleasing design, and often the discovery of one new fragment would cause us to alter utterly the whole design” (Morris Bishop). To what extent is this true in history and one other area of knowledge? To what extent = Ex: (Nat Sciences- atomic theory) (History- soviet archives opened- new outlook, perspective) KI: RLS: Assumption: Implication: AOK: WOK: 5: This is a bit of an intellectual joke. Does Bishop mean a collage, a mosaic, or a jigsaw-puzzle? This one requires you to think...

    Epistemology, Humanities, Natural science 559  Words | 3  Pages

  • Psychology Theory

    Personality Theory Paper PSYCH-504 March 17, 2014 Personality Theory This Personality Theory paper will be written on The Blind Side. This movie was based on a true life story of Sean Tuohy and Leigh Anne. It begins with a Caucasian family who takes this homeless African American teenager whose name is Michael, but called Big Mike. While Michaels mom lived in a drug infested projects, he never knew who his father was. Michael had very little to no education and very limited skills to help him...

    Carl Jung, Maslow's hierarchy of needs, Person 1117  Words | 2  Pages

  • Chapter 12 Theory in Cultural Anthropology by Lavenda

    19 th Century Approaches Unilineal cultural evolutionism—generally regarded as the first theoretical perspective to take root in the discipline of anthropology a relationship of society advancement though a series of progressive stages. In this theory, people believed cultures develop under one universal order of society evolution. First originating from the mid-nineteenth century philosopher Herbert Spencer, Unilineal Evolution classified the differences and similarities of cultures by categorizing...

    Anthropology, Cultural anthropology, Culture 1943  Words | 7  Pages

  • Global Food Crisis

    Global Food Crisis Several theories are associated with Social Change, the social scientific perspective discusses sociocultural rebellion; how it affects the world (Weinstein, 2011). Social cultural evolution has a direct effect on society’s development such as industrialization, metropolitan progress, and cultivated revolt (Weinstein, 2011). Evolutionary theory and human populations are changing; people become victims of tragedies and lose territories causing elimination of the human population...

    Famine, Food security, Karl Marx 1050  Words | 3  Pages

  • Globalization and Culture Change

    From a sociocultural anthropological perspective, by investigating how globalization affects different parts of the world we can build a better understanding of how global structures affect social and cultural practices. Globalization is the worldwide interdependence of economic and cultural activities through the interchange of worldviews, goods, beliefs, and other aspects of culture (Lalonde slide 22/01/13). To facilitate interdependence, globalization uses new technology, innovation, tourism...

    Anthropology, Core countries, Culture 1856  Words | 7  Pages

  • Uses and Gratifications Theory, Cultivation Theory, Agenda Setting Theory

    CULTURAL IMPERIALISM Explanation of Theory: Cultural Imperialism Theory states that Western nations dominate the media around the world which in return has a powerful effect on Third World Cultures by Individual Interpretations: Western Civilization produces the majority of the media (film, news, comics, etc.) because they have the money to do so. The rest of the world purchases those productions because it is cheaper for them to do so rather than produce their own. Therefore, Third World countries...

    Diffusion of innovations, Innovation, Mass media 1941  Words | 6  Pages

  • DSE212 TMA02

    Explain using specific research examples how learning has been studied from the cognitive perspective and the sociocultural perspective. Learning, in its broadest sense, involves a process of change in behaviour, knowledge or any other type of understanding as a result of experience. While both the cognitive and sociocultural perspectives address the means by which the human organism makes sense of its world, the conclusions they reach as to how this is achieved bear little resemblance. Proponents...

    Cognitive psychology, Cognitive science, Developmental psychology 1193  Words | 2  Pages

  • the theory

    Template for Annotated Bibliography The journal article: Author(s) name(s): (Last name, first initial) Maftoon, P and, Sarem, S Year of publication: 2012 Title of the article: The Realization of Gardner's Multiple Intelligences (MI) Theory in Second Language Acquisition (SLA) Name of the journal: _____________________________________________________ Journal Number and Issue Number: Issue 6, 90355924 Article pages: p1233-1241 DOI number (if available): 10.4304/jltr.3.6.1233-1241 ...

    Education theory, Emotional intelligence, Howard Gardner 466  Words | 3  Pages

  • Choose one of the following readings from the first module book, The art of English: everyday creativity:

    suggests that the plural term creativities may be preferable in defining it. (Carter, p.54) argue that creativity is best understood by means of clines and with reference to social contexts by referring, thus building and developing Csikszentmihalyi’s theory that what is estimated to be literary or what is valued as creative either seen as ordinary or extraordinary is relative to the contexts in which it is used and to the values of those that shares in its use as both producers and consumers. As well...

    Cognition, Creativity, Metaphor 1873  Words | 6  Pages

  • social changes

    society. Social change may include changes in nature, social institutions, social behaviors, or social relations. The base of social change is change in the thought process in humans. Social change may refer to the notion of social progress or sociocultural evolution, the philosophical idea that society moves forward by dialectical or evolutionary means. It may refer to a paradigmatic change in the socio-economic structure, for instance a shift away from feudalism and towards capitalism. Accordingly...

    Anthropology, Civilization, Evolution 1653  Words | 6  Pages

  • Theory X And Theory Y

    Theory X and Theory Y From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article may require copy editing for grammar, style, cohesion, tone, or spelling. You can assist by editing it. (October 2014) Theory X and Theory Y are theories of human motivation, created and developed by Douglas McGregor at the MIT Sloan School of Management in the 1960s, that have been used in human resource management, organizational behavior, organizational communication and organizational development. They describe two contrasting...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Management 1113  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theory X, Theory Y

    Theory X, Theory Y by Douglas McGregor is a motivation theory. Douglas McGregor is a social psychologist and applied two sets of assumptions to the organizational structure called Theory X and Theory Y. His theory is based on managerial views of human beings. In his book, The Human Side of Enterprise, he outlined a new role for managers. He stated that managers should assist subordinates in reaching their full potential, rather than commanding and controlling. Theory X is negative and Theory Y can...

    Behavior, Douglas McGregor, Goal 1381  Words | 4  Pages

  • Theory X and Theory Y

    Theory X and Theory Y Douglas McGregor (1906 - 1964) is one of the forefathers of management theory and one of the top business thinkers of all time. He was a social psychologist who became the President of Antioch College. He later became a professor of management at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (he was succeeded by Warren Bennis). His book The Human Side of Enterprise (1960) had a profound influence on the management field, largely due to his Theory X and Theory Y. McGregor developed...

    Control, Douglas McGregor, Goal 1209  Words | 4  Pages

  • Bus310 Accounting Theory and Accountability

    BUS310 ACCOUNTING THEORY AND ACCOUNTABILITY WORKSHOP 1 SOLUTIONS 1) GHHT: Chapter 1: Theory in Action 1.1 The article describes how a particular theoretical approach has been replaced by another. Explain why one theory replaces another, and who, or what, determines whether an existing theory survives. A theory is primarily meant to explain or predict an event, behaviour or outcome. Proponents of a theory look for evidence to support the theory. This evidence should be independently observed...

    Balance sheet, Economics, Explanation 961  Words | 4  Pages

  • the work of Lev Vygotsky

    The work of Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934) has become the foundation of much research and theory in cognitive development over the past several decades, particularly of what has become known as Social Development Theory. Vygotsky's theories stress the fundamental role of social interaction in the development of cognition Vygotsky, 1978), as he believed strongly that community plays a central role in the process of "making meaning." Unlike Piaget's notion that children's' development must necessarily...

    Child development, Developmental psychology, Jean Piaget 768  Words | 3  Pages

  • Personal Theory Paper

     Personal Theory Deana Micheal Theories and Practice: Human Services in Criminal Justice CJHS/400 October 20, 2014 Tracey Newman Personal Theory Throughout my experience my current course, Theories and Practices: Human Services in Criminal Justice, I have learned plenty of information about the various theories of psychotherapy in counseling. Some of these theories operate on the basis of recognizing errors in thinking and correcting those errors. Other theories operate on the basis of...

    Cognition, Cognitive science, Criminal justice 963  Words | 6  Pages

  • Classical Theory, Bureaucracy and Contingency Theories Explained

    The earliest contributors to our understanding of management theory include practising managers and social scientists. More recent theorists have tended to be academics or management consultants. The early the early theorists can be divided into two main groups- the practising managers, such as Taylor and Fayol, and the social scientists, such as Mayo and McGregor. The Classical Theories The classical management theory is a school of management thought in which theorists delved into how to find...

    Bureaucracy, Management, Max Weber 1591  Words | 6  Pages

  • Comparing Psychological Theories

    The Psychodynamic Theory, or psychoanalytic as it is also referred to, stresses the influence of unconscious forces on human behavior. It is the systematized study and theory of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, emphasizing the interplay between unconscious and conscious motivation (Gallop & Reynolds 2004). Its roots focus on the roles of unconscious sexual and aggressive impulses as a motive for choice and self-direction. The theory presents itself as our way of trying to balance...

    Brain, Evolutionary psychology, Human behavior 872  Words | 3  Pages

  • Theory X & Theory Y

    Theory X and Theory Y represent two sets of assumptions about human nature and human behavior that are relevant to the practice of management. Theory X represents a negative view of human nature that assumes individuals generally dislike work, are irresponsible, and require close supervision to do their jobs. Theory Y denotes a positive view of human nature and assumes individuals are generally industrious, creative, and able to assume responsibility and exercise self-control in their jobs. One would...

    Abraham Maslow, Douglas McGregor, Human behavior 2261  Words | 7  Pages

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