"Identify The Key Elements Of Psychodynamic Cognitive Behavioural And Person Centred Theories Of Counselling Giving Consideration To How Each Theory Develops The Relationship Between Client And Coun" Essays and Research Papers

  • Identify The Key Elements Of Psychodynamic Cognitive Behavioural And Person Centred Theories Of Counselling Giving Consideration To How Each Theory Develops The Relationship Between Client And Coun

    Unit 2: Introduction to Counselling Skills Theories Theory Essay Written Introduction In this essay I will describe key elements of Psychodynamic theory, Person-Centred theory and Cognitive-Behavioural theory. I will also identify the key differences between the above theories. I shall also describe how counselling theory underpins the use of counselling skills in practise. I will then end with my conclusion. 1.1 Key elements of psychodynamic theory Dr Sigmud Freud (1856-1939), is...

    Carl Jung, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Libido 1682  Words | 5  Pages

  • compare and contrast three core theories of counselling

    Compare and Contrast the Three Core Theories of Counselling The British Association for Counselling’s Code of Ethics and Practice for Counsellors states that ‘Counselling may be concerned with developmental issues, addressing and resolving specific problems, making decisions, coping with crisis, developing personal insight and knowledge, working through feelings of inner conflict or improving relationships with others’ (BACP Ethical Framework). Throughout this essay I will illustrate the similarities...

    Carl Jung, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Psychoanalysis 2615  Words | 7  Pages

  • Core Theoretical Perspectives in Counselling

    perspectives in counselling, personal centred, cognitive behavioural and psychodynamic I will look at the general theory, the view of the person in therapy, the blocks to functioning of the person in therapy and the goals and techniques of each theory. I will compare and contrast the three approaches looking at the similarities and differences between the three counselling perspectives and how the counsellor in each theory differ in their techniques to counselling their clients. The person centred counsellor...

    Carl Jung, Classical conditioning, Freudian psychology 2058  Words | 5  Pages

  • An Introduction to the Counselling Theories Humanistic, Cbt and Psychodynamic

    science. He first introduced his concept of a hierarchy of needs in his 1943 paper "A Theory of Human Motivation”. Maslow’s hierarchy of needs is most often displayed as a pyramid. The lowest levels of the pyramid are made up of the most basic needs, while the more complex needs are located at the top of the pyramid. Maslow emphasised the importance of self-actualisation, which is a process of growing as a person to achieve individual potential. The humanistic movement wanted to take a more holistic...

    Abraham Maslow, Consciousness, Humanistic psychology 2693  Words | 7  Pages

  • Different Counselling Approaches

    Counselling Some people may be embarrassed to attend therapy, believing they have failed in some way. However, this is not the case. Many people choose professional counselling and find they are able to make a huge success of their life. Just talking to someone confidentially who is not a friend or family member can make all the difference. Counselling provides a regular time for those in distress to explore their feelings and talk about their problems. A counsellor should help you develop better...

    Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Humanistic psychology 1895  Words | 6  Pages

  • “Compare and Contrast the Different Ways the Person-Centred and Cognitive- Behavioural Approaches to Counselling Understand and Make Use of the Counselling Relationship”

    ways the person-centred and cognitive- behavioural approaches to counselling understand and make use of the counselling relationship”   This essay is written to compare the counselling relationship in person-centred and cognitive-behavioural counselling by outlining both the theory and practice of the counselling relationship. This will be done by outlining the theory of the counselling relationships and the theory in practice. Both person-centred and cognitive-behavioural counselling are widely...

    Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Cognitive therapy 1549  Words | 5  Pages

  • Understanding counselling theory.

    Certificate in Counselling Skills Assignment 2 Understanding counselling theory. Unit 2- R/601/7575 Hana Lewis- 144383 ABC 17970-33 Contents Page 3 : Introduction. (157 words) Page 3 : Origins of Person- centred counselling (198 words) Page 4: Key concepts and principles of Person- centred counselling. (288 words) Page 5 : How does Person-centred counselling, influence the understanding of the development of concept of self? (245 words) Page 6 : How does person-centred approach inform...

    Carl Jung, Identity, Personality psychology 1403  Words | 5  Pages

  • Essay 1 Psychodynamic counselling CBT Working Alliance therapeutic relationship 18 nov 13

    therapeutic relationship in both Psychodynamic Counselling and CBT Introduction (300 words approx) In my essay I shall be exploring my understanding of the working alliance, and effective therapeutic relationship in both Psychodynamic Counselling, and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. I shall include my experience gained in class and outside of the classroom setting. With situations of when I have demonstrated my understanding of the therapeutic alliance and therapeutic relationship. Since I began...

    Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Mental health 2080  Words | 6  Pages

  • Person Centred Theory

    Contents Introduction 2 Person Centred Therapy 2 Unconditional Positive Regard (UPR) 3 Empathy 4 Congruence 5 Conclusion 5 REFERENCES 6 Bibliography 6 “Person Centred Theory/Values, my understanding” Introduction Person Centred Theory is also known as Rogerian Therapy and is based on the theories of Carl Rogers. Rogers theorized that each person is motivated by an actualizing tendency, a force that drives us to reach our maximum potential physically, spiritually and emotionally (Noel,...

    Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Gestalt therapy 1779  Words | 6  Pages

  • Discuss the Strengths and Weaknesses of the Three Main Theories Covered in This Module.

    Discuss the Strengths and Weaknesses of the Three Main Theories covered in this Module. This essay will attempt to highlight and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the three main theories of counselling within the module covered this term. The three approaches in discussion are psychodynamics, cognitive behavioural and humanistic. The psychodynamic theory originated from Sigmund Freud, a medical doctor and philosopher (1856 - 1939) founded in the 1900s. Freud developed his ideas whilst...

    Carl Jung, Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy 1975  Words | 7  Pages

  • Briefly Outline the Key Features of a Cognitive-Behavioural Approach to Counselling

    Briefly outline the key features of a cognitive-behavioural approach to counselling and discuss some of the ways in which this approach differs from one of the other main approaches to counselling. In part two reflect on and write about which of the two approaches discussed in your essay you prefer and why. This essay will explain key aspects of a cognitive-behavioural approach to counselling. Revealing how this method of counselling differs from the psychodynamic approach, and demonstrating my...

    Behavior, Carl Jung, Psychoanalysis 1491  Words | 5  Pages

  • THEORY IN PRACTISE CSTL3

    ESSAY: THEORY IN PRACTICE CST-L3 There are three main theoretical approaches/models used in Counselling: Humanistic/Person centred developed by Carl Rodgers, Psychodynamic theories developed by Sigmund Freud and Behavioural therapies such as (T/A) TRANSACTIONAL ANALYSIS founded by Eric Berne and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). If any of the above are used effectively in practice, a therapist will be able to help an individual achieve positive change in problematic areas presented...

    Carl Jung, Games People Play, Psychodynamic psychotherapy 2159  Words | 6  Pages

  • DESCRIBE SOME OF THE WAYS THAT THE PERSON-CENTRED APPROACH (PCA) DIFFERS TO COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL (CBT) AND PSYCHODYNAMIC APPROACHES TO COUNSELLING.

    DESCRIBE SOME OF THE WAYS THAT THE PERSON-CENTRED APPROACH (PCA) DIFFERS TO COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL (CBT) AND PSYCHODYNAMIC APPROACHES TO COUNSELLING. In order to be able to say what the differences are between PCT, CBT and Psychodynamic approaches to counselling I have first of all set out below a brief summary of all three; Person centred therapy concentrates mainly on the subjective experience of the client and on how they might lose touch with their own organismic experiencing through taking...

    Cognitive behavioral therapy, Cognitive therapy, Mind 1115  Words | 3  Pages

  • ‘Evaluate the Claim That Person-Centred Therapy Offers the Therapist All That He/She Will Need to Treat Clients.

    title: ‘Evaluate the claim that Person-Centred Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients.’ The Person Centred approach is based upon the theory and philosophy of Carl Rogers. This approach in its set-up is familiar to the general public as it is depicted in the media and is often expected therefore that a counselling session would take place in this format. At first glance the counselling process which has derived from the theory of Rogers, in a real therapy situation...

    Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Humanistic psychology 2461  Words | 7  Pages

  • Comparing the Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Counseling Models

    This essay will discuss the similarities and differences between the cognitive-behavioural and psychodynamic models of counselling. I shall begin by investigating the ways in which the two models view the person and their experience of mental life; how they explain the problem(s) experienced by individuals and, finally, how help is offered to those in psychological distress. The assignment will reach the conclusion that, while the two approaches are very different in their origins and techniques...

    Behavior, Carl Jung, Human behavior 1275  Words | 4  Pages

  • Describe Some of the Ways That the Person-Centred Approach Differs to Cognitive Behavioural and Psychodynamic Approaches to Counselling.

    Describe some of the ways that the Person-Centred Approach differs to Cognitive Behavioural and Psychodynamic Approaches to Counselling. The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction, not a destination. (Rogers, 1961, p.186) The Mental Health Foundation (2012, Talking Therapies) refers to certain therapeutic approaches as talking therapies. These therapies include: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), Psychodynamic Therapy and Person Centred Therapy (PCT). The Foundation...

    Cognitive behavioral therapy, Consciousness, Psychoanalysis 1128  Words | 4  Pages

  • A report that reflects on Person Centred Therapy and considers how this model could be incorporated alongside the core model of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in my current Counselling Practice.

    Comparative Models of Counselling, Assignment Two A report that reflects on Person Centred Therapy and considers how this model could be incorporated alongside the core model of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in my current Counselling Practice. I reflected on Person-centred Therapy (PCT) as the comparative model because of the conflict that exists between this and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). The conflict is historical, political and from personal experience. In therapy...

    Behaviour therapy, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Cognitive restructuring 2248  Words | 6  Pages

  • “the Relationship Between Counsellor and Client Is the Most Influential Factor in Whether Counselling ‘Works’”. Critically Discuss This Statement from the Perspective of at Least Three Approaches to Counselling.

    Relationships play an important role in everyday life. You or I may define a relationship with a person in many different ways depending on the context with whom the relationship is with, whether this be peers, colleagues or loved ones. So is it possible to have a relationship with someone who you don’t know, someone such as a therapist? It may be possible; however this is not the type of relationship that is being described within counselling therapy. The client-counsellor relationship is unlike...

    Existential therapy, Interpersonal relationship, Psychoanalysis 2071  Words | 6  Pages

  • Describe Some Aspects of Your Learning About Helping in a Counselling Way and What This Has Taught You About Yourself

    University: Introduction to Counselling Course Term 1, Coursework essay: 19th February 2013 (submission date) Author: Monica Malkani Describe some aspects of your learning about helping in a counselling way and what this has taught you about yourself This essay aims to address a number of aspects of counselling that I have found particularly interesting since starting the introductory course in Counselling in October 2012. This will include a brief history of counselling; what it means to help...

    Abraham Maslow, Hamburger Helper, Licensed Professional Counselor 2431  Words | 7  Pages

  • Introductory to Counselling Assessment 2

    15/05/2013 Criteria 7.1 – Describe the main elements of humanistic theory Words: 263 Date: 22/05/2013 Criteria 8.1 - Describe the main elements of psychodynamic theory Words: 248 Date: 05/06/2013 Criteria 9.1 - Describe the main elements of cognitive behavioural theory Words: 217 Date: 05/06/2013 Criteria 10.1 – Compare basic differences between the three theories Words: 131 Date: 15/05/2013 – 22/05/2013 – 05/06/2013 Criteria 11.1 – describe how theory might underpin skills * Humanistic...

    Carl Jung, Emotion, Humanistic psychology 1276  Words | 5  Pages

  • Counselling Concepts Level 2

    COUNSELLING CONCEPTS LEVEL 2 ESSAY The decision to take this course was rooted in a deepening interest in psychotherapy, self–development, the welfare of other people and in a desire to gain a theoretical base to enrich my current arts and health practice. I understand counselling to be a helping practice that differs from other helping activities, such as teaching for example. Counselling requires professional training and is specifically contracted or explicitly agreed. It has a theoretical...

    Cognitive psychology, Consciousness, Mind 1303  Words | 4  Pages

  • Person Centred Counselling

    Person-CentredCounselling Person-centred counselling is a form of therapy which allows the client to be at the core of their own therapy and make their own goals. For the person-centred approach to be effective a relationship built on trust must be formed between the counsellor and the individual. This essay will explore the theoretical ideas and practice skills of person centred counselling. Key figure (Founder) and Major Focus Carl Rogers (1902-1987), an American psychologist was the...

    Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Humanistic psychology 2174  Words | 7  Pages

  • Compare and Contrast the Different Ways Person-Centred and Psychodynamic Make Use of the Counselling Relationship

    The process of counselling has at its core the personal progress and growth of the individual. Both the psychodynamic and the person-centred models are accepted to be therapeutic procedures the aim of which is to bring to the client a better insight and a clearer understanding of their life. Although classed as being different they are both efficient approaches if practised with efficacy. There are numerous differences between the two models but despite this, there are many similarities too. The...

    Emotion, Humanistic psychology, Present 968  Words | 3  Pages

  • Compare and Contrast Person Centred with Psychodynamic

    approaches, I will review the relationship between client and counsellor. I will attempt to discover how the relationship is formed and how it is maintained during the therapeutic process. Once this has been established, I will then look at how the changes occur in the therapeutic relationship and which techniques will be used. I will compare and contrast the approaches of Carl Rogers, Sigmund Freud and Albert Ellis. I will look at how their theories have impacted on the counselling processes in modern times...

    Emotion, Id, ego, and super-ego, Present 2450  Words | 7  Pages

  • Compare and Contrast How the Cognitive-Behavioural and Person-Centred Models of Counselling Understand the Person, and How These Two Approaches Explain the Psychological Distress Experienced by Individuals. in Part 2,

    Compare and contrast how the cognitive-behavioural and person-centred models of counselling understand the person, and how these two approaches explain the psychological distress experienced by individuals. In Part 2, reflect on and write about which of the two models appeals most to you and why. In this assignment I will describe and explain how the cognitive-behavioural approach to counselling reflects behaviour as learned. I will explore how the cognitive-behavioural approach describes dysfunctional...

    Behavior, Behaviorism, Classical conditioning 1546  Words | 5  Pages

  • Describe and Evaluate Carl Jung’s Theory Concerning Personality Types and Show How It Might Usefully Help a Therapist to Determine the Clients Therapeutic Goals?

    Describe and evaluate Carl Jung’s theory concerning personality types and show how it might usefully help a therapist to determine the clients therapeutic goals? ~ Word count 2247 Personality can be described as the individual’s characteristic patterns of thought emotion and behaviour together with psychological mechanisms-hidden or not behind those patterns. The influence of both genetics and heredity factors alongside upbringing, culture and experience are recognised as influencing...

    Carl Jung, Extraversion and introversion, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator 2258  Words | 6  Pages

  • Comparing and Contrasting Three of the Main Counselling Approaches

    Three of the main forms of counselling can sometimes be confusing. In this article I hope to unravel and clarify some of the mystery surrounding these three types of counselling approaches by means of comparing and contrasting with reference to their differing theoretical rationale, therapeutic interventions and processes of change. The Person Centred Approach (Originator: Karl Rogers 1902 – 1987) focuses on the belief that we are all born with an innate ability for psychological growth if...

    Abraham Maslow, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Mind 777  Words | 3  Pages

  • Compare and contrast CBT and psychodynamic approaches to counselling focusing particularly on trauma and PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder): Theory and therapy.

    Compare and contrast CBT and psychodynamic approaches to counselling focusing particularly on trauma and PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder): Theory and therapy. When working with clients in today’s society it’s extremely important to take into consideration the specific needs of each individual. Serious contemplation is given to the approaches and methods regarding the client’s need and presenting matters. Trauma appears in many forms in society, even from the 1960’s due to the impact on returning...

    Cognitive behavioral therapy, Complex post-traumatic stress disorder, Posttraumatic stress disorder 2358  Words | 7  Pages

  • Evaluate the Claim That Person-Centred Therapy Offers the Therapist All That He/She Will Need to Treat Clients

    “Evaluate the claim that Person-Centred Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients The humanistic movement was established as a way to expand and improve upon the two other schools of thought; behaviourism and psychoanalysis, which had, up until the first half of the 20th century dominated psychology. An American theorist called Abraham Maslow began to research creativity in humans through art and science. He first introduced his concept of a hierarchy of needs in...

    Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Clinical psychology 2513  Words | 7  Pages

  • Person Centered Counselling

    field of counselling contains many theories, sometimes very different from each other. There are, however, three major theoretical approaches: “humanistic”, “psychodynamic” and “cognitive behavioural” and within each of these approaches there are discrete models, for example, “person centred” and “transpersonal”. This diversity of counselling theories and approaches is really valuable and important. Why? Because the different theories relate to different ways of thinking about how people develop and manage...

    Locus of control, Motivation, Need 1009  Words | 3  Pages

  • Compare and contrast how the person-centred and psychodynamic models of counselling understand the person, and how these two approaches explain psychological distress experienced by individuals.

    and contrast how the person-centred and psychodynamic models of counselling understand the person, and how these two approaches explain psychological distress experienced by individuals. (1250 words) Within society today, there is an extensive range of theoretical approaches used by Psychotherapists and counsellors. The aim of this discussion is to compare and contrast two of these approaches, the person-centred and the psychodynamic models of counselling, especially how these theories understand...

    Carl Jung, Psychoanalysis, Psychodynamics 1238  Words | 4  Pages

  • Evaluate the claim that Person-Centred Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients

    Evaluate the claim that Person-Centred Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients For this assignment I have been asked to ‘Evaluate the claim that Person-centred Therapy offers the therapist all that he/she will need to treat clients’. In order to do this I need to fully understand what Person-centred Therapy is and what it involves. For this reason I will start by evaluating Person-centred therapy itself and how it works. I will then look at the strengths and weaknesses...

    Carl Rogers, Humanistic psychology, Phenomenology 2599  Words | 7  Pages

  • anylise three types of therapies in counselling

    and contrasts three theoretical models of counselling. For comparison and contrasting purposes, my work has identified three main theories, cognitive behavioural therapy, the person centred therapy, and gestalt therapy. CBT, person centred therapy, and gestalt therapies are three theoretical models that have been applied in psychotherapy for many years. Despite their similarities and use in counselling, the three therapies hold distinct differences from each other. Being one of the most preferred...

    Behavior, Clinical psychology, Gestalt therapy 1438  Words | 4  Pages

  • Compare and Contrast How Treatment Would Proceed for a Woman Suffering from Depression, Anxiety and Feelings of Inadequacy If She Undertook Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.

    Cognitive behavioural and psychodynamic approaches to therapy seem to offer contrasting modes of treatment for psychological difficulties, largely due to the fact that they originate from very different theoretical and philosophical frameworks. It seems likely, therefore, that treatment for a woman experiencing depression, anxiety and feelings of inadequacy will proceed along very different lines according to each approach. There do appear to be some features, however, which are common to all effective...

    Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Psychoanalysis 2032  Words | 7  Pages

  • models and approaches relate to client need, therapeutic context and aims and objectives of the therapy.

    Through analysis and evaluation of models and approaches within counselling and psychotherapy therapeutic delivery, explain how models and approaches relate to client need, therapeutic context and aims and objectives of the therapy. Psychotherapists will be educated in various different models and whether they are approaching a client through the concept of observing external behaviours, the Behaviourist approach for example in which a therapist will look to condition new behaviours, or through...

    Carl Jung, Clinical psychology, Psychoanalysis 1106  Words | 4  Pages

  • “Behaviourists Explain Maladaptive Behaviour in Terms of the Learning Principles That Sustain and Maintain It. Discuss This Statement and Show How a Behaviourist’s Approach to Therapy Is in Stark Contrast to a Psychoanalytic One”.

    that sustain and maintain it. Discuss this statement and show how a behaviourist’s approach to therapy is in stark contrast to a psychoanalytic one”. The term ‘therapy’ has been defined as an activity which ‘involves the treatment of a disease or disorder, by some remedial, rehabilitating, or curative process’. Historically, there has been considerable development in the range and types of therapy that can be used to help a client overcome problems in a modern world, with some sharing similarities...

    Behavior, Behaviorism, Classical conditioning 2454  Words | 7  Pages

  • Counselling Theories

    1. Identify four key personality/human development theories. The four personality and human development theories are • Behavioural • Psychoanalytical • Humanistic • Post Modern 2. Explain the concept of nature versus nurture. Nature is the biological qualities that an individual inherits from his parents through conception and nurture is the environmental factors and experiences that influence the individual from birth. 3. Explain the concept of genetic inheritance and...

    Anal stage, Developmental psychology, Genital stage 845  Words | 3  Pages

  • Psychodynamic Theories Affect Individual Personality

    Running head: PSYCHODYNAMIC THEORIES AFFECT 1 �PAGE � �PAGE �7� PSYCHODYNAMIC THEORIES AFFECT INDIVIDUAL Psychodynamic Theories Affect Individual Personality University of Phoenix Psychodynamic Theories Affect Individual Personality Individuals differ from one another and each personality is unique. Be it physically, emotionally, intellectually or psychologically, each person portrays distinct characteristics that are exclusive. Many psychodynamic theorists have theorized the origins and contributions...

    Anal stage, Carl Jung, Freudian psychology 1409  Words | 5  Pages

  • Explanations of Human Behaviour: the Psychodynamic and Cognitive Theories.

    Human Behaviour: The Psychodynamic and Cognitive Theories. This essay will purport to discuss the case study of Suzy. Suzy presents with symptoms of two mood disorders, namely depression and anxiety. The two theoretical perspectives that will be used are Psychodynamic theory and Cognitive theory. Suzy’s depression and anxiety present with certain symptoms. These symptoms, as well as the behaviour that results, will be explained and analysed using firstly the psychodynamic theory which will then be...

    Cognitive science, Jean Piaget, Mind 1487  Words | 4  Pages

  • Compare and contrast the Psychodynamic and Humanistic approaches to understanding personality.

     Compare and contrast the Psychodynamic and Humanistic approaches to understanding personality. People engage in topics of personality on a daily basis. It is how we engage with others, behave towards them and how we assert judgement. Personality theorists attempt to explain these connections through theory, observation and testing. Particular influential theories of personality are psychodynamic and humanistic theory. I will seek to analyse the prime divergences that separate these approaches...

    Carl Jung, Humanistic psychology, Personality psychology 1561  Words | 6  Pages

  • What Is Your Understanding of the Basic Elements or Principles Inherent to Psychodynamic Counselling as Expressed by Lawrence Spurling in “an Introduction to Psychodynamic Counselling?”

    Laurence Spurling illustrates in great detail principles and elements that encompass psychodynamic counselling. The relationship between therapist and client is paramount to the counselling process and is a defining feature in psychodynamic theory. The therapeutic dialogue between client and counsellor is vital for this therapeutic process. Through adopting an attitude of mutuality the counsellor aims at creating sanctuary and meaning for the client so they will gain an experience of containment. The setting...

    Alfred Adler, Carl Jung, Libido 1814  Words | 6  Pages

  • Theories: Psychotherapy and Core Conditions

    RELEVANCE THEORIES TO COUNSELLING FIELD HAVE BEEN PERCEIVED AS BEING NOT EFFECTIVE IN THE AFRICAN CONTEXT. DISCUSS (25) INTRODUCTION Counselling is a process that focuses on enhancing the psychological well-being of the client, such that the client is then able to reach their full potential. This is achieved by the counsellor facilitating your personal growth, development, and self-understanding, which in turn empowers you to adopt more constructive life practices. Counselling may be helpful...

    Humanistic psychology, Psychology, Psychotherapy 1181  Words | 4  Pages

  • Psychodynamic Theory

    Psychodynamic Theory The psychodynamic theorist such as Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung suggest that psychological, emotional, and motivational forces occur in an unconscious level. Given the diverse cultural backgrounds that exist it is pivotal that professionals in the field develop an understanding of the ethnocentric limitations of the psychodynamic theory. Understanding the psychodynamic theory and multicultural elements coincide, but given the ethnocentric limitations discussed in this paper...

    Carl Jung, Culture, Psychoanalysis 1269  Words | 4  Pages

  • The Historical Development of Counselling

    David Baty Theory Assignment 1 1.1 Explain the historical development of Counselling Counselling and Psychotherapy began in the early 18th century. The shift in how society dealt with mental health issues came about primarily due to the advent of the popularisation of science through the beginning of the industrial revolution. Society became increasingly transient and anonymous and the responsibility for behaviour became from the individual rather than from the community as a whole. In the...

    Abraham Maslow, Awareness, Maslow's hierarchy of needs 1797  Words | 5  Pages

  • Understand Different Approaches to the Use of Counselling Skills

    Understand Different Approaches to the use of Counselling Skills Introduction I am writing about the different approaches used in counselling skills such as Humanistic Approach and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Approach. I will be discussing the key concepts in each approach and contrast both approaches. While Maslow was more of a theorist, Carl Rogers was more of a therapist. His professional goal was more on helping people change and improve their lives. He was a true follower of...

    Albert Ellis, Clinical psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy 1533  Words | 5  Pages

  • Compare and Contrast Psychodynamic and Humanistic

    Compare and contrast how the psychodynamic and person-centred approaches to counselling understand the person, and how these two approaches explain psychological distress experienced by individuals. In part 2 reflect on and write about which of the two models appeals most to you and why? INTRODUCTION Psychodynamic and person-centred approaches to counselling have many differences in the way they understand the person and explain psychological distress. Part one below reviews both approaches...

    Carl Jung, Libido, Psychoanalysis 1825  Words | 7  Pages

  • Psychodynamic Theory

    JULY 05, 2011 Psychodynamics is the theory and systematic study of the psychological forces that underlie human behavior, especially the dynamic relations between conscious motivation and unconscious motivation. Psychodynamics also describe the processes of the mind as flows of psychological energy (Libido) in an organically complex brain. The words ‘psychodynamic’ and ‘psychoanalytic’ are often confused. Sigmund Freud’s theories were psychoanalytic, whereas the term ‘psychodynamic’ refers to both...

    Carl Jung, Libido, Penis envy 1509  Words | 6  Pages

  • Explore the Person Centred Approach in Relation to Counselling Practice

    Explore the Person Centred approach in relation to counselling practice The roots of the Person Centred approach, now considered a founding work in the Humanistic school of psychotherapies, began formally with Carl Rogers in the 1950’s. Dealing in the 'here and now' and not on the childhood origins of the client's problems, basic assumptions of the Person Centred approach state that clients are essentially trustworthy; that they have a vast potential for understanding themselves and resolving...

    Conceptions of self, Identity, Personality psychology 2574  Words | 7  Pages

  • How an Understanding of Human Growth and Development Can Assist the Counsellor

    explain how an understanding of human growth and development can assist the counsellor in responding to the needs of the client. I have chosen three theories in three different models. My first model is psychodynamic and I will look at Sigmund frauds theory of development. The second model is humanistic and I will be covering Rogers and Maslow. My last model I will cover in this essay is social Erikson’s lifespan development theory. My essay will look at the theories and the application of each theory...

    Anal stage, Erikson's stages of psychosocial development, Genital stage 2560  Words | 7  Pages

  • Counselling Ppt

    conceptualizes career counselling as “one-to-one or small group relationship between a client and a counsellor with the goal of helping the client(s) integrate and apply an understanding of self and the environment to make the most appropriate career decisions and adjustments” . The primary focus is on helping the client make career-related decisions and deals with careerrelated issues. CAREER DEVELOMENT THEORIES 1) Trait-and-factor theory: ) The origin of trait-and-factor theory can be traced back...

    Career, Counseling, Gale 1006  Words | 18  Pages

  • ‘’Evaluate the Claim That Person-Centred Therapy Offers the Therapist All That He/She Will Need to Treat Clients‘’.

    for a multitude of reasons relating to personal growth, marital or family conflict and work dissatisfaction to name a few. One of the recognized theories of counselling today was developed by the humanistic psychologist Carl Rogers in the 1940s and although this new approach to psychotherapy ran contrary to the theories dominant at the time, person-centred therapy is considered one of the major therapeutic approaches nowadays, whose concepts and methods have influenced and inspired the practice of...

    Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, Humanistic psychology 2560  Words | 7  Pages

  • Psycho Dynamic Theories

    Psychodynamic Theory: "Fathers Influence on Children’s Development" Jeff Santiago California State University, Fresno Human Behavior in the Social Environment: A Multi-Systems Approach Social Work 212 Dr. Kris Clarke October 15, 2012 Psychodynamic Theory: "Fathers Influence on Children’s Development" Psychodynamic Theory Understanding the significance of the father’s role and their influences on children’s development has been at the forefront of empirical research over the last ten...

    Carl Jung, Childhood, Developmental psychology 1109  Words | 4  Pages

  • Psychodynamic theory

    Psychodynamic Theory Part 1: Psychodynamic theory is a view that explains personality in the terms of unconscious and conscious forces, such as beliefs and unconscious desires. Sigmund Freud in the early 20th century proposed a psychodynamic theory according to which personality consists of the ID. The ID is responsible for instincts and pleasure-seeking. He also proposed the idea of the superego which attempts to obey the rules of society and parents. The superego is split into two parts, conscience...

    Attachment theory, Interpersonal relationship, Object relations theory 2099  Words | 6  Pages

  • Psychodynamic Counselling Concept

    In this essay I mainly discuss the theory and concepts behind psychodynamic counselling, followed by brief discussions of the practice and skills involved in working as a psychodynamic counsellor, and the client’s experience of counselling. Theory/concepts Psychodynamic counselling is mainly concerned with unconscious processes; it takes for granted that humans possess a largely unconscious inner world. Freud argued that while the conscious mind is governed by logic, the unconscious mind is...

    Carl Jung, Consciousness, Mind 1123  Words | 4  Pages

  • Psychodynamic Counselling Overview

    Psychodynamic Counselling – Overview. Psychodynamic counselling has a long history and vast literature to condense so only a brief overview is possible here – following on from the themes already discussed and with particular focus on four psychologists: Freud, Jung, Adler and Klein. “The primary purpose of psychodynamic counselling is to help clients make sense of current situations; of memories associated with present experience, some of which spring readily to mind, others which may rise...

    Carl Jung, Mind, Object relations theory 908  Words | 3  Pages

  • DESCRIBE PSYCHODYNAMIC, BEHAVIOURAL, COGNITIVE BEHAVIOURAL AND HUMANISTIC COUNSELLING THEORIES AND PRACTICE AND EXPLAIN WHICH ONE YOU WOULD PREFER TO USE

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