• Othello
    but now, even now. Act 2 Sc.3 ln 163.” Iago gives the impression to Othello that he is true and faithful to Cassio while the audience knows through dramatic irony he set Cassio up as they have seen Iago’s soliloquy in which he says “Am I to put our Cassio in some action. That may offend the isle. But...
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  • Othello
    o Patterns of imagery – toads, beasts Act I Scene 1 o Roderigo loves Des, rejected by her father - Roderigo tries to impress her parents - Ingratiate (suck up) o Iago introduced (soliloquy) - “I am not what I am” (p5, line 66) - Deceitful, hypocritical, pretends to love...
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  • Othello - a Tragedy Without Meaning?
    the audience. By examining Iago's actions and his soliloquies the audience is able to discern that Iago does indeed have motives for his actions, however weak they may be. Despite Iago recognising that indeed the moor ‘is of a free and open nature' (Oth Act 1 Sc. 3 ll. 381), he still does...
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  • What Typical Aspects of Iago's Character and of Shakespeares Methods of Presenting a Character Are Found in Othello?
    soliloquies warn the audience of Iago's plots to bring down the Moor and provide a break in the flow of the play so that the audience can reflect on the true nature of Iago. In the soliloquy at the end of Act 2, Iago tells us of his plan. "I'll pour this pestilence into his ear" (Sc. 3, Act 2) This...
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  • Othello - Iago
    hath a daily beauty in his life that makes me ugly." It is as if Iago has allowed us to follow his journey from revenge to finally madness. Iago's emotive feelings are dictating the direction of the plot. The audience ponder whether Iago will gain some control and restore balance. By Act 3 sc...
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  • Iagos Plague
    Roderigo. Iago recognizes that Roderigo is consumed by lust for Desdemona and would go to the extremes to make her his own. Iago convinces Roderigo that the only way to win Desdemona’s heart is to give her money; “...Put money in thy purse...” (Act 1, sc. iii, line 339). However...
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  • “the Mere Fact That Someone Cruelly Destroys a Potentially Happy Marriage Is Sad, Not Necessarily Tragic.” What, Then, Makes Othello a Tragedy?
    . For example, he explains in his soliloquy in Act 1 Scene 3 of “The Moor [Othello} is of a free and noble nature/That thinks men honest that but seem to be so...” The audience knows this to be true when Othello easily succumbs to Iago’s speculations of Desdemona’s possible adultery as he believes that...
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  • Othello
    destroyed in a storm. Cassio returns first – he and Iago trade verbal ‘barbs’ or witty/funny comments to each other, whilst waiting with Desdemona and Emilia (who is Mrs. Iago) Sexist/Misogynistic Language Act 1 Scene 3 – p. 40 Act 2 Scene 1 – pp.55-59 Find examples of sexist language. What do...
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  • Othello and Estella
    earlier in the Tragedy. In Act 3 Scene 3, Othello’s soliloquy provides evidence that Iago has been successful in troubling his mind. Iago’s lies and manipulation are causing a change to occur in Othello’s tone and language. Shakespeare’s choice of imagery in this scene reflects Iago’s growing influence...
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  • Othello
    is trying to give a bad impression of Othello when he is speaking to the royal family in Venice. The general consensus is that “the Moor” is a man of trust and honour. Montano (Act 2 sc 3) refers to Othello as “worthy Othello” and is “hotly called” (Act 1 Sc 2) to the Duke, suggesting his importance...
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  • Othello
    away from Othello, Iago, like an angel to a doubting saint, is there to restore his faith. In Act 1, Scene 3, Roderigo¡¯s hopelessness even brings him to the verge of suicide, but Iago gives him many reasons why Desdemona will not remain true to Othello: that Desdemona ¡°must change for youth...
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  • Notes
    falls in Act 3, Scene 1, is the most famous and the most celebrated one, because it is the most philosophical of all. In this soliloquy, Hamlet enters with a dilemma: “To be or not to be – That is the question” In this soliloquy, Hamlet enters toying with the idea of suicide. He thinks of the two...
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  • Othello
    because that his where Desdemona will go because she was unfaithful the him. Simile (Act 1, scene 3, line 391-392): "The food that to him now is as luscious as locusts..." In a simile Iago compares the taste of food to the delicious taste of locusts. (Act 1, scene 1, line 50): ``Wears out his...
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  • Othello
    domineering person. This is in keeping with the stereotypical assumption of black-skinned men as violent and physical being. The society of Venice in the 1600's was highly racist - and the above quote is a clear testament to this. “put money in thy purse” (Act 1, Scene 3): Iago is convincing Roderigo...
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  • To What Extent Is Iago Responsible for Othello's Downfall
    and Iago, and by his own thinking, contemplates murder. “How shall I murder him, Iago?” Although Iago does succeed in convincing Othello to kill Desdemona, there is no quotation before Act 4 Scene 1 which could serve as evidence that Iago pushes Othello as far as contemplating Cassio’s murder. Most of...
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  • othello questions
    intelligent, manipulative man and Roderigo is a foolish, gullible and stupid.  Iago relationship with Roderigo is that he is just using him Roderigo is devastated to learn that Desdemona had eloped with Othello, so Iago uses this too his advantage. In act 1 scene 3 Roderigo says, “What should I do...
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  • Othello
    to do the best for them. Iago uses Roderigo to get Cassio in trouble with Othello. Since Roderigo is in love with Desdemona, I confess it is my shame to be so found (of Desdemona)(Act 1. Sc 3. Ln 360), Iago tells Roderigo that Cassio is in love with her and she in love with Cassio. Desdemona is...
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  • Hamlet Coleridge Critique
    at rest in their graves, but wander solicitous of the affairs of the world. Relig. Meet. Pt. I. Sect. 37. Act iii. sc. i. Hamlet's soliloquy: To be, or not to be, that is the question, &c. This speech is of absolutely universal interest,—and yet to which of all Shakspeare's characters could...
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  • Othello
    Desdemona A most dear husband" (2.1.290-292). Montano describes him as "noble," (2.3.132) and many of his subordinates admire him. Othello is eloquent, as evident in his many speeches, such as the one in Act 1, Scene 3 (l.78-96). He claims that he won Desdemona's heart through his stories and words. He is...
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  • Othello
    come again."(act 3, sc. 3, line 100), showed that he felt his life was only in order if he is loved. His innocence and lack of sophistication is revealed in this statement. The people around him also knew of Othello's attitude. Iago was very quick to see this. In his first soliloquy, Iago said "the...
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