• Epicurus
    contrasts with the Stoic hormê, in other worlds the “life drive”, which is the innate nature of self-preservation. Both similar and contrasting ideologies differ in their views of nature and their journey to be virtuous or prudent. This paper explores, compares, and contrasts the differences between...
    Premium 1105 Words 5 Pages
  • A Comparison and Contrast of Three Ancient Roman Philosophies
    A Comparison and Contrast of Three Ancient Roman Philosophies by Melanie Pelzel Introduction This paper compares and contrasts three different views of philosophy of Roman times: Epicureanism, Stoicism, and Neoplatonism. These three philosophies were created out of a need for...
    Premium 2208 Words 9 Pages
  • The Best Girl
    Questions (PHerc. 307) and on various topics in Stoic logic and in Epicurean philosophy of language. david blank is Professor of Classics at UCLA. He has written on various topics in ancient philosophy and the study of language in antiquity, including a translation and commentary on Sextus...
    Premium 127262 Words 510 Pages
  • Contemporary Thinkers: Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aguinas
    dream. Question #2 : Please compare and contrast the political thought of Plato and Aristotle, in particular their competing conceptions of an ideal polity. Which do you prefer and why? Central to Plato's thought is the power of reason to reveal the intelligibility and order governing the changing...
    Premium 6315 Words 26 Pages
  • Stoism
    Stoism Philosophy When the Apostle Paul visited Athens, he took the message of Christ to the marketplace where a wide variety of people could be encountered. Among those he talked to were Epicurean and Stoic philosophers. We read about his encounter with them in Acts 17. Who were these...
    Premium 520 Words 3 Pages
  • Hggjkl
    pleasure and pain in Epicurean philosophy LAP 96-100 and contrast this to that of the Stoic dispassionate view of ethics and pleasure and pain. (16) How does Plotinus’ epistemology (theory of knowledge) compare to Plato’s divided line. See LAP 105-106? (17) Why are neo-platonists considered pantheistic and similar to Xenophane?...
    Premium 929 Words 4 Pages
  • Philosophical Comparisons
    of care that would define us. After analyzing the main points of both philosophies, it becomes clear that the main difference between Stoics and Epicureans is the fact that the Stoics argued that the universe is organized in such a way that the experiences that it provides to humans in the...
    Premium 1104 Words 5 Pages
  • The New Vice President
    Stoicism is a school of Hellenistic philosophy founded in Athens by Zeno of Citium in the early 3rd century BC. The Stoics taught that destructive emotions resulted from errors in judgment, and that a sage, or person of "moral and intellectual perfection," would not suffer such emotions.[1] Stoics...
    Premium 1031 Words 5 Pages
  • Plutarch
    , and historical, political, and ethical issues. This collection includes several pieces that criticize the philosophies of the Stoics and the Epicureans, including “On the Self-contradictions of the Stoics” and “That One Cannot Live Happily Following Epicurus.” Plutarch was a Platonist and because...
    Premium 1582 Words 7 Pages
  • Plato vs Aristotle
    GROUP ASSIGNMENT Compare and contrast the philosophical position of both Aristotle and Plato to an understanding of Greek Philosophy. Political Philosophy is the study of fundamental questions about the state, government, politics, liberty, justice, property, rights, law and the enforcement...
    Premium 3806 Words 16 Pages
  • A Cursory Examination of Classical Philosophy
    Skeptics The Epicureans, Stoics and Skeptics each had philosophies on how to live one’s life, what to believe about reality, and what to do about fears and certain beliefs. The Epicureans believe that one ought to maximize pleasure while minimizing suffering. However, they were also quick to point...
    Premium 2722 Words 11 Pages
  • Classical vs. Hellenistic Periods
    believed in tolerance and forgiveness. They advocated participation in public affairs. Stoics despised war and slavery, and preached equality and pacifism. The Epicureans and the Stoics did, however, believe in one common idea-that achieving tranquility of the mind was the objective of life. Skepticism...
    Premium 680 Words 3 Pages
  • Ethics
    death. Stoic philosophy says to accept things that cannot be changed, resigning oneself to existence and enduring in a rational fashion. Death is not feared. People do not "lose" their life, but instead "return", for they are returning to God (who initially gave what the person is as a person...
    Premium 1702 Words 7 Pages
  • death is nothing to us
    nature in a proto-Darwinian way, as the result of a process of natural selection. e. The Gods Because of its denial of divine providence, Epicureanism was often charged in antiquity with being a godless philosophy, although Epicurus and his followers denied the charge. The main upshot of Epicurean...
    Premium 6246 Words 25 Pages
  • Human Needs
    Nussbaum should be taking into consideration when developing her list. It is the things that should not be ignored such as the demands of nature but that we should learn to live in harmony with them. I think that the Epicureans would agree. Both Stoic and Epicurean philosophy emphasizes practical...
    Premium 7874 Words 32 Pages
  • Stoicism
    UC 310 Dr.Finn Stoicism The philosophy of the Stoics played a central role in developing the ideals of the Roman ruling classes. This philosophy emerged in Greece in the early 3rd century B.C. with the thought of Zeno, a native of Citium on the island of Cyprus. He and his...
    Premium 3576 Words 15 Pages
  • Clean Hand in a Dirty Business
    to the philosophical theories that are our primary concern, those of Plato (first in the Phaedo, then in the Republic), Aristotle (in the De Anima or On the Soul), Epicurus, and the Stoics. These are by far the most carefully worked out theories of soul in ancient philosophy. Later theoretical...
    Premium 13482 Words 54 Pages
  • Cruelty
    , being that all His operations are natural and without endeavour.--[Rousseau, in his Emile, book v., adopts this passage almost in the same words.]-- It has been the opinion of many philosophers, not only Stoics, but Epicureans--and this addition-- ["Montaigne stops here to make his excuse for...
    Premium 6546 Words 27 Pages
  • Stoic V. Epicurean: the Battle of Moral Theories
    was also enticed by the teleological beliefs of the Stoics. But there were ideas that Epicurus and Epictetus believed in that led me to criticize both philosophies, the Epicurean views about injustice and death and the Stoic view of duty in particular. One of the first criticisms I noticed when...
    Premium 1049 Words 5 Pages
  • The Good Life
    Since the beginning of time, the quest of the human race has been to discover how to live the "good life". Hellenistic philosophers struggled with this question, but it was the Stoics who best answered it. Other schools at this time, the Cynics and the Epicureans, encouraged extremes of limitation...
    Premium 867 Words 4 Pages