• Sugar in the Atlantic World
    . When the Portuguese and Spanish were able to have sugar produced in the Caribbean and Brazil, the profits were enormous. By the mid 1700’s sugar became cheaper and was therefore more easily accessed by the lower classes of people. There has never been so much misery and human blood shed...
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  • Tourism
    Indians around 200 A.D., though by 800 their culture had been superseded by that of the Caribs. These early Amerindian cultures called the island "Iouanalao" and "Hewanorra," meaning "Island of the Iguanas." There was no European presence established on the island until its settlement in the 1550’s...
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  • Guyana's Culture
    Culture name: Guyanese Identification. Guyana is an Amerindian word meaning "the land of many waters." Attempts to forge a common identity have foundered, and it is more accurate to speak of African, Indian, and Amerindian Guyanese cultures. There were small European, Portuguese "colored," and...
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  • Capr Syallbus
    Cultural Diversity Cultural Diversity is the existence of sub-cultures within a main culture or different cultures in a larger area such as the Caribbean and the US. IMPACT OF HISTORICAL PROCESSES Migratory Movements Social Stratification The ancestors of the pre-Colombian Amerindians...
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  • Barbados: Dominated The Carribean Sugar Industry
    were of the Saladoid-Barrancoid group who were fishermen, ceramists and farmers. The second wave of Amerindian nomads was the Arawak people who arrived around 800 CE. It is believed that Barbados was originally called Ichirouganiam, because the name Barbados comes from the Portuguese in the 1500's...
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  • Suriname
    country and the sounding of their culture. Composition The population of Suriname is a mixture of different ethnic groups namely: • Dutch, • French, • (buushpuwee) Bhojpuri, • Sarnami; and • Javanese • Amerindians, the original inhabitants of Suriname, form 3.7% of the population...
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  • Describe the Language Situation in Grenada.
    centuries including the Amerindian, French, African and British people groups. The first known settlers on the island of Grenada were a peaceful Amerindian tribe known as the Arawaks. They migrated from South America and proceeded to settle and populate the Caribbean islands. They settled on the...
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  • Global Manager Training Abroad
    male(s)/female | | | | total population: | 1.02 male(s)/female | Ethnic groups: |   | Mestizo (mixed Amerindian and white) | 70% | Amerindian and mixed (West Indian) | 14% | White | 10% | Amerindian | 6% | Family and kin play a central role in the social lives of most Panamanians...
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  • Unit 4 Apwh
    America? Most influential defender of the Amerindians in early colonial period Served as the most important advocate for native people 25. What was the encomienda system? A grant of authority over a population of Amerindians in the Spanish colonies Provided grant holder with a...
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  • 6b Notes- Physics
    rates, ethnic background and migration patterns. Many demographic studies explain the effects of social conditions on the size and composition of a population. For example, several studies of the1900's found a direct correspondence between the growth of science, medicine and industry and a decline...
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  • There Is Not One Caribbean Culture but Many Caribbean Cultures
    shares similar interests with the islands of the West Indies, such as food, festive events, music, sports, etc. Visual Art takes many forms in Guyana, but its dominant themes are Amerindian, the ethnic diversity of the population and the natural environment. Much historic architecture reflects the...
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  • A History of Guyana and Its Culture
    , it is considered a part of the Caribbean, for its culture has a similarity with the northern islands and many other places. Their culture reflects the influence of African, Indian, Amerindian, Chinese, British, Dutch, Portuguese, Caribbean, and American culture. It may be more accurate to speak of...
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  • Caribbean Studies
    - Amerindian element in their population and so blacks are not dominant. They represent large influx of indenturedlabour of Europeans and Asians. So here again the culture will be subject to ethnic cultures and sub-cultures. Music and cultural expressions continue to be very popular in the Caribbean...
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  • Carib Studies
    Amerindian element in their population and so blacks are not dominant. They represent large influx of indentured labour of Europeans and Asians. So here again the culture will be subject to ethnic cultures and sub-cultures. Music and cultural expressions continue to be very popular in the Caribbean from...
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  • history sba
    ., CXC Lecture Series Caribbean History, 2009 Baldeosingh K. and Mahase R., Caribbean History for CSEC, 2011 Claypole W., Caribbean Story Book 1, 2001 Dookhan I., A Pre-Emancipation History of the West Indies, 1971. Greenwood R. and Hamber S., Caribbean Certificate History 1 Amerindians to Africans...
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  • Barbadoes
    association with the Tourism Development Corporation, The Barbados Tourism Authority and the Barbados Statistical Service, Caribbean Tourism Organization, Bridgetown, Barbados. Smith, S. L. (1990). Dictionary of Concepts in Recreation and Leisure Studies, Westport Connecticut, Greenwood Press...
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  • Historical Foundations Unit 2 Ip
    1950’s “'maquinas' or 'yank tanks'” in which we call cars here in the United States. References CIA World Factbook (2006 edition) Cuba Census 2002 webpage Statoids (July 2003). Municipios of Cuba. Retrieved on 2007-03-06. http://www.fi.edu/school/math3/FACTSCARIB.html http://indexmundi.com/cuba/demographics_profile.html Matanzas Portal (2004). Population growth by municipality and province. Retrieved on 2007-03-06. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Cuba...
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  • Early Settlement Patterns
    , Central America and the Caribbean. They had all of this new land to mine and to farm so they needed all the workers that they could get: " The Spanish considered using Amerindians [Native Americans] as their labor force, but eventually relied on African slaves. Though Amerindians were often used...
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  • New Directions - Exploration, Expansion, Society, and the Arts
    .” His landing in the Caribbean in 1492 ushered in the era of European exploration and domination of the New World. * Bartholomew Diaz: In 1488, Bartholomew Diaz rounded the Cape of Good Hope and returned back to Portugal without reaching India. His journey gave motivation for Vasco da Gama to round...
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  • Sociology
    , cultures, and religions coincide in society and the society adapts and accepts the colorful genre comprising its heritage. Over the last 50 years according to George Roberts, a Caribbean Demographic theorist who studied the population of Jamaica says that there are 5 stages which can be used to...
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