"Biological Perspective Of Depression" Essays and Research Papers

  • Biological Perspective Of Depression

    Exploring the Biological Perspective on Depression Depression is defined by Webster’s Dictionary as “a state of being depressed; a state of feeling sad. A psychoneurotic or psychotic disorder marked especially by sadness, inactivity, difficulty in thinking and concentration, a significant increase or decrease in appetite and time spent sleeping, feelings of dejection and hopelessness, and sometimes suicidal tendencies” (Merriam-Websters). Major depression affects over fifteen...

    Antidepressant, Human brain, Major depressive disorder 2118  Words | 7  Pages

  • Cognitive Perspective on Cause of Depression

    . Cognitive Perspective on the Cause of Depression Jasmine Elyse Fore Developing a Psychological Perspective Persuasive Paper Capella University June, 2013 Depression is a common mental health disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control (2011) depression affects 1 in 10 Americans in the U.S. alone. Depression does not know race, ethnicity, age or gender. “The cognitive perspective on the cause of depression believes that depression can be caused by faulty thinking, low-self-esteem...

    Biology, Clinical psychology, Major depressive disorder 1366  Words | 5  Pages

  • Biological Explanation of Unipolar Depression.

    One biological explanation for unipolar depression is the monoamine hypothesis. The monoamines are a group of neurotransmitters which include serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine. You will recognise the latter, dopamine, from the biological offering of an explanation for schizophrenia. The monoamines are believed to regulate mood. One of the functions of serotonin is to regulate the other neurotransmitters. Without the regulation provided by serotonin, erratic brain functioning and thinking patterns...

    Bipolar disorder, Dopamine, Major depressive disorder 942  Words | 3  Pages

  • Women and Depression: Biological Factors

    mental disease, which is what we normally call "depression". Women statistically are the majority group who is diagnosed each year with either anxiety or depression. It is nearly twice as many as men. In addition, they have some unique risk factors for the disorders; they are also facing some variations of depression specific to their sex (Dennis and Charles 147). There’re several major causes of depression that may occur in women involving biological (i.e. genetics, hormones), social (social roles...

    Bipolar disorder, Childbirth, Estrogen 1030  Words | 3  Pages

  • Outline and Evaluate the Biological Explanation of Depression.

    Outline and evaluate the biological explanation of depression. Biological explanation of depression can be explained by neurotransmitter dysfunction. Neurotransmitters such as noradrenalin and serotonin have been shown to be linked with depression. Bunney at al (1965) found that there was low levels of noradrenaline function in the brain of depressed individuals. Also, post mortem studies found increased noradrenaline receptors in the brains of depressed suicide victims. When there is low noradrenaline...

    Antidepressant, Dopamine, Human brain 699  Words | 3  Pages

  • Psychology Perspectives and the Biological Foundations of the Brain

    Psychology Perspectives and the Biological Foundations of the Brain Cassandra Tabor PSY/300 October Fifth, 2009 University of Phoenix Psychology Perspectives and the Biological Foundations of the Brain Psychology is the scientific investigations of the mental processes such as: behavior, thought, and emotions. Emerging from philosophy and biology, psychology revolutionized the way scientists study the human brain. Wilhelm Wundt, the “father of psychology,” applied scientific research and...

    Behaviorism, Brain, Cognition 1271  Words | 4  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression is a manic-depressive form of an attack. With low emotional, mental retardation, and speech movements decreased slowly for the typical symptoms. In patients with severe depression troubled life and work, to family and society of the heavy burden, about 15% of patients with depression die by suicide. World Health Organization, the World Bank and Harvard University, a joint study shows that depression has become the world's disease burden of disease is the second serious illness. Caused...

    Bipolar disorder, Depression, Dysthymia 2139  Words | 5  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression Introduction Depression is a common illness most people are affected by. Every person has suffered through at least one depression episode if not more. Depression does not discriminate against age, ethnicity or gender. For some people, depression is so severe they feel like it’s not worth living. Other people feel generally miserable or unhappy without really knowing why. Definition Depression is a medical illness that involves the mind and body. It affects how you feel, think...

    Bipolar disorder, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Major depressive disorder 1445  Words | 5  Pages

  • Depression

    EFFECTS OF DEPRESSION IN ADOLESCENCE In recent years, depression has been a major topic in the news and media and its effect on individuals. Depression therefore is a serious condition that affects the human brain in such a way that it affects the thoughts and intentions of many. Adolescent depression is often overlooked because they have a hard time expressing their feelings which leads to serious complications in most teenagers because they have a hard time dealing with school work and mates...

    Adolescence, Bipolar disorder, Death 1294  Words | 4  Pages

  • Depression

    Olympian preparatory and english school | Depression | The things that you need to know about depression | | Danica G. Perez | 4th year | 2012-2013 | W hat is Depression? Depression is uncomfortable mental state that may be characterized by such adjectives as blue, dejected, or discouraged, in psychology, mood or emotional state marked by feelings of low self-worth or guilt and reduced the ability to enjoy life. In ordinary usage it refers to a mood state which is called dysthemia...

    Bipolar disorder, Dysthymia, Major depressive disorder 1606  Words | 6  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression The normal ups and downs of life and the feeling of sad and “the blues” from time to time might mean you may have a mood disorder. And if you have that feeling of emptiness and despair that has taken hold of your life and will not let go that could be a sign of depression. Depression makes it tough to function and enjoy life like you once did. And getting through the day can be very overwhelming. But not matter how hopelessness you feel you will get better. Understanding the signs and...

    Bipolar disorder, Dysthymia, Major depressive disorder 1390  Words | 3  Pages

  • Depression

    A Research Paper: Depression Depression is defined as a mental illness in which a person experiences deep, unshakable sadness and diminished interest in nearly all activities. The term depression is used to describe the temporary sadness, loneliness, or blues that everyone feels from time to time. Depression is one of the most common mental illnesses. The illness affects all people, regardless of sex, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic standing. Women are two to three times more likely...

    Antidepressant, Bipolar disorder, Fluoxetine 1077  Words | 4  Pages

  • Depression and Its Impact

    Depression is a state of low mood and hatred to activity that can have negative effects on an individual’s behavior, feelings, thoughts, view of the world, and physical status. Most people feel anxious or depressed at times. Losing a loved one, getting fired from a job, going through a divorce, and other difficult situations can lead a person to feel sad, lonely, scared, nervous, or anxious. These feelings are normal reactions to life's stressors. But some people experience these feelings daily...

    Dopamine, Emotion, Human brain 574  Words | 3  Pages

  • depression

    severe depression affects more than 15 million people and that 15 percent of them eventually attempt suicide. This is more common than one may think. Depression is now the third-leading cause of death among people aged 14-19, claiming more lives annually than AIDS, diabetes, and cancer combined. What is happening to our teenagers that is making them feel that life is so bad that they have to hurt themselves? Isn’t that the question of the year? Well, let’s consider different types of depression, the...

    Bipolar disorder, Depression, Dysthymia 935  Words | 3  Pages

  • Depression According to Cross-Cultural and Behavioural Perspective

    Research Question: Depression according to the Cross-cultural and Behavioural Perspectives Mariam Magdalena Diallo Professor: Ms. Samineh Izedi I- Introduction: Depression is an illness that affects the psyche, the mind the soul and the physical aspects of the individual. Its symptoms are various and differ from one another. Through the Behavioural and Cross Cultural Perspectives within psychology’s theories clearly give a detailed explanation of this phenomenon. This essay will...

    Behavior, Bipolar disorder, Cultural studies 1991  Words | 6  Pages

  • Depression: A Biopsychosocial Perspective

    Depression: A Biopsychosocial Perspective Major Depressive Disorder, or depression, is by far the most common mental illness in Canada. It affects people from all ethnic, socioeconomic and religious backgrounds. It is estimated that 8% of Canadians will suffer from depression at some point in their lives. With such prevalence, much study and analysis has been done to find a root cause. Three different perspectives are studied in the hopes of finding this origin. The biological perspective, focuses...

    Dopamine, Major depressive disorder, Neurotransmitter 761  Words | 2  Pages

  • Teenage Depression

    Victoria Dixon July 5, 2014 Teen Depression Adolescence is an unsettling time, with the many physical, emotional, psychological and social changes that accompany this stage of life. Often times these emotional changes, whether hormonal or influenced by life occurrences, or both, are to blame. It can quickly turn into a severe problem like teenage depression and even to suicide. Dealing with these struggles, ups and downs, and challenges as a teen can be scary and difficult. It...

    Adolescence, Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Educational psychology 635  Words | 3  Pages

  • Outline and evaluate biological therapies as treatments of depression.

    Outline and evaluate biological therapies as treatments of depression. There many forms of treatment to cure depression, many of which are biological. These target the physical and chemical side of the body. Anti-depressants and other drugs are the most common forms of treating depression. They work by boosting levels of insufficient neurotransmitters such as serotonin and nor-adrenaline. They will either reduce the amount of re-absorption or block the enzyme that is trying to break down...

    Antidepressant, Electroconvulsive therapy, Fluoxetine 1370  Words | 5  Pages

  • Psy 340 Biological Psychology Worksheet

    Biological Psychology Worksheet July 17, 2012 PSY/340 Biological Psychology Psychoanalytic and behavioral perspectives in human behavior influenced the early views of psychology. This was because the role between behavior and the brain was not understood and science had not evolved far enough to understand the complexities of the human brain. However, as science and technology developed, the ability to learn what regions of the brain were associated with specific types of behavior was explored...

    Brain, Cerebellum, Cerebral cortex 663  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Biological Approach to Unipolar Depression

    The Biological Approach to Unipolar Depression. Katie Evans Abnormal behaviour was once thought to be caused by supernatural possession; this demonological model of abnormality was especially popular in the Middle Ages. It was not until the 18th century that psychologists began to argue that this behaviour should be treated as an illness and medical techniques could be used to treat it; and so emerged the medical model of abnormality. (Gross & McIlveen, 1996)1 The medical model of abnormal psychology...

    Abnormal psychology, Antidepressant, Dysthymia 2074  Words | 6  Pages

  • Biological

    Biological and Humanistic Approaches to Personality Everyone has their own individual personality. How does one get it? Are you born with it? These are some of the questions one may ask themselves about their own personality. There are many different biological aspects of personality, along with many theories obtaining to them. Some aspects of personality, people are just born with while others are people’s way of thinking which make them that way. Although people may come to their personality...

    Extraversion and introversion, Human, Humanistic psychology 962  Words | 3  Pages

  • Biopsychosocial Perspective

     Biopsychosocial Perspective Christina Parker PSYCH 626 April 07, 2014 David Engstrom Biopsychosocial Perspective Psychologists past, present, and future desire the answer to one basic question; “what factors influence a person’s physical and mental health are they related if a relationship exists”; thus Health Psychology emerged. In pursuit of the answer several models or perspectives came about. Over time psychologist realized that focusing on one causal factor results in partial...

    Biopsychosocial model, Disease, Epidemiology 1536  Words | 6  Pages

  • Depression

    INFORMATIVE SPEECH OUTLINE DEPRESSION JIMENA VILLEGAS SPC1017 INTRODUCTION Hook: How many of you are going through depression? Or do you have friends and/or family members who are going through depression? Thesis Statement: Today I will talk about depression. I will talk about the background, the causes of this disease, the symptoms and finally, the treatment and prevention of depression. BODY I. Background A. What is depression? 1. According to Dr. Jane Doe from...

    Bipolar disorder, Health care, Illness 683  Words | 3  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression Speech. We all get the blues sometimes, but when those bad feelings hang on for weeks or even months, it's probably more than a response to the ordinary hard times that everyone goes through in life, It may be an illness called Depression says “Teen Health and Wellness”, edited by Jan S. Hittelman published April 2012. Depression is when someone feels sad, discouraged, hopeless, exhausted, and alone for a long period of time. Depression is the second largest killer in the United...

    Bipolar disorder, Depression, Dysthymia 1020  Words | 3  Pages

  • Depression

    traditional role as a college-aged teenager. For traditional Chinese American boys, fathers represented authority figures, and role models. (Asian American parenting and parent-adolesecent relationships, 2010).  From a westernized theological perspective, Joe is negotiating Erikson’s intimacy vs isolation stage of psychosocial development, (1956).   During this stage, young people are expected to form intimate, loving relationships with other people. They are moving toward more adult responsibilities--planning...

    Alfred Adler, Carl Jung, Family 2467  Words | 7  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression PSY350: Physiology Psychology May 6, 2013 Depression Depression in children is mainly in children when he or she is medicated, it is very common for depression to be unrecognized. Risk factors always include a family history of depression or even a poor school performance. Acknowledging children who are unrecognized should be evaluated. The risk factors also would be reduced and with problems like school failure and suicide would be less (November 15, 2000). Children and adolescents...

    Bipolar disorder, Dysthymia, Major depressive disorder 2451  Words | 7  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression is a Direct Indicator of Possible Suicide Depression is a serious illness that should be treated with utmost care. The long-term effects of depression can ultimately lead to suicide, which means those who suffer from its symptoms should seek appropriate medical care. A majority of individuals experience some kind of emotional sadness on a recurring basis for a variety of reasons. The relationships we co-construct influence how we feel. However, temporary sadness is not a component of...

    Bipolar disorder, Depression, Dysthymia 795  Words | 3  Pages

  • depression

    May 01, 2014 Darlene Gutierrez COM 172. Depression. Overview  Introduction.  Definition.  Types of depression.  Factors and statistics  Diagnosis.  Conclusion.  References. Introduction. There is considerable information that people do not know about depression, and at least at some point in one’s lives have gone through this condition. Many people have experienced some unhappiness or sadness as part of changes that happen in everyday life. Feelings of pain often are transient, even...

    Bipolar disorder, Depression, Dysthymia 563  Words | 6  Pages

  • depression

     Teen Suicide and Depression “Help ME!!!” Do you ever wonder if being irritable or an unhappy adolescent might actually be experiencing teen depression? Teenage Depression is everywhere we look, these two words appears together as one, in newspapers and magazines, as well as in scholarly reports. Teenage depression is one of today's "hot topics" this among other teenage mental health problems, has been brought to the forefront of public consciousness in recent years after several incidents...

    Adolescence, Bipolar disorder, Major depressive disorder 2530  Words | 7  Pages

  • depression

    Adolescent Depression Depression in adolescents is something that is overlooked. Most parents or teachers do not know the signs of depression in their adolescents and it leads to more serious problems. Studies indicate that one in five children have some sort of mental, behavioral, or emotional problem, and that one in ten may have a serious emotional problem. Among adolescents, one in eight may suffer from depression (about-teen-depression.com). We see these statistics everyday in America, whether...

    Bipolar disorder, Depression, Dysthymia 1331  Words | 4  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that may be a normal reaction to life events or circumstances, a symptom of some medical conditions, a side effect of some drugs or medical treatments, or a symptom of certain psychiatric syndromes such as the mood disorders major depressive disorder and dysthymia. Depression in childhood and adolescence may be similar to adult major depressive disorder, although young sufferers may exhibit increased irritability or aggressive and self-destructive...

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Dysthymia 1687  Words | 5  Pages

  • Depression

    Title: Depression Introduction Many people know how hard it is because They've had to deal with Depression in their day to day lives. Everyone who has ever had to deal with Depression knows it seems like no one else understands. sense Many of us live with this simple yet incredibly disabling problem it has changes manny lives. Body: 1- on-set of Depression 2-symptoms 3-treatment Conclusion Depression as affected most of the population but the...

    Abnormal psychology, Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Depression 415  Words | 3  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression By: Shelly McNalley Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology Teacher: Michelle Sharpe May 22, 2013 Depression I. What is Depression? II. Signs and Symptoms of Depression a. Feelings of helplessness and hopelessness b. Loss of interest in daily activities c. Appetite or weight changes d. Sleep changes e. Anger or irritability f. Loss of energy g. Self-loathing h. Reckless behavior i. Concentration problems ...

    Antidepressant, Bipolar disorder, Major depressive disorder 1355  Words | 7  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression is not only a state of being sad, it is a disease that conquers the ability to feel emotion, whether good or bad, whatsoever. Depression not only involves the mind, it also involves the body and thoughts. In different cultures some complain of excessive headaches and extreme pain and this is identified as depression, moderate or otherwise. This disease can be passed down through genes or can follow external events or can be caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain. Depression affects...

    Antidepressant, Bipolar disorder, Dysthymia 1387  Words | 4  Pages

  • Historical Perspective to Abnormal Psychology

    Historical Perspectives of Abnormal Psychology PSY September 17, 2012 Historical Perspectives of Abnormal Psychology Abnormal psychology is a field in psychology that concentrates on abnormal behavior and psychopathology of humans. Abnormal psychology focuses on disorders from obsession-compulsive, hypochondrias, phobias, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, depression, to sexual disorders to name a few. Clinical psychologists, counselors, and psychotherapists work in the area of...

    Abnormal psychology, Behavior, Brain 877  Words | 3  Pages

  • Depression

    Professor Wilson ENG 101 11February 2013 Depression What is depression? Is it something you have experienced before? My assumption is that, people don’t understand this illness if they have never experienced it. If they can’t see it (like the flu or cancer) then they don’t believe it. Most people believe depression is some kind of “scam” to justify laziness. What does it mean to be depressed and how can you control it? Treatment for depression like many other mental disorders, usually rely...

    Bipolar disorder, Depression, Dysthymia 932  Words | 3  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression is a disorder concerning specific thinking patterns, physical and behavioral aspects, as well as emotions. This disorder entails an overall sense of sadness, worthlessness, and lack of motivation. It can happen to anyone; any race, age, or gender. It has been found that depression usually affects people during their more productive years; between the ages of 25 and 44 and affects up to at least 10 million people per year (Healthyplace.com, 2008). It is normal for everyone to feel...

    Anxiety, Anxiety disorder, Great Depression 2417  Words | 7  Pages

  • Depression Persuasive Paper

    has shown that depression is a very complex topic. The word depression is used in many different ways. Having depression is hardly just "being sad", or not being able to "get over" something. There are many factors that cause/lead to depression. Many people believe that depression is caused by a result of one’s life situations; abuse, long term poverty, victim of a crime, long term illness, death of a loved one, or divorce, which would be considered a cognitive perspective. Depression has been found...

    Bipolar disorder, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Depression 1145  Words | 4  Pages

  • Depression

    Depression is a serious mental health concern that will touch most people's lives at some point in their lifetime (either directly or through someone close they know). The suffering endured by people with depression and the lives lost to suicide attest to the great burden of this disorder on individuals, families, and society. Improved recognition, treatment, and prevention of depression are critical public health priorities. Organizations such as the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)...

    Bipolar disorder, Depression, Dysthymia 762  Words | 3  Pages

  • depression

    cruel and harsh. In the course of these values of life, the enlarged power of the rule endangered democracy. 3) Generally discuss the Great Depression. As part of your discussion be sure to address the Depression's causes, and the efforts of the Hoover and Roosevelt administrations to bring the United States out of its economic problems. The depression began on October 29,1929, which was the day when the humanity got twisted upside down. It was hailed as Black Tuesday for the reason that was...

    Economy of the United States, Frederick Jackson Turner, Great Depression 2331  Words | 5  Pages

  • Humanistic Perspective and Addiction

    Humanistic Perspective and Addiction There are several theories of addiction. All of them are imperfect. All are partial explanations. It is for this reason that it is important to be aware of and question addiction theories. One contemporary psychoanalytical view of substance abuse is that it is a defense against anxiety (Thombs D 2006). Addicts often abuse alcohol and other substances to guard against anxiety and other painful feelings like shame, guilt, loneliness and depression. Psychological...

    Addiction, Alcoholism, Drug addiction 1415  Words | 5  Pages

  • Exercise and Depression

    “Healthy body, healthy mind” Can exercise help with depression? STUDENT ID: 8401122 Abstract This report aims to determine the efficacy and benefits of exercise in the management of depression, which is classified by the World Health Organisation as a mood disorder. In order to place exercise therapy into context, conventional methods for treating clinical depression are discussed. A personal meta-analysis is then...

    Antidepressant, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Fluoxetine 1584  Words | 9  Pages

  • Biological Perspective

    opinion of herself, the antidepressants helped her to feel well enough to start to re-engage with people and to put into practice some of the ideas and life skills she was learning in therapy. By the time the medication was slowly stopped after her depression had lifted, she had firmly established new patterns of behaviour and relationships. She was easily able to continue this new and more useful way of being, therefore removing the need for further medication. Back to Top The Disadvantages of...

    Addiction, Antidepressant, Bipolar disorder 327  Words | 2  Pages

  • BIOLOGICAL FACTORS OF CLINICAL DEPRESSION IN WOMEN

     Running head: BIOLOGICAL FACTORS OF CLINICAL DEPRESSION IN WOMEN Biological Factors of Clinical Depression in Women Name University Abstract Clinical depression affects women twice as often as men. As with many mental disorders, a variety of factors may be involved with the onset of depression in women. Specific attention has been paid to the biological factors, such as the changes in the brain, hormones, and genetics. Neurotransmitters play a big role in depression. They are and is associated...

    Bipolar disorder, Hippocampus, Human brain 2882  Words | 14  Pages

  • Comparison of Pathophysiology for Depression and Schizophrenia with its therapeutic effect

     Abstract This review focuses on the possible factors that play a role on the development of psychological disorders such as genetic, biological and environmental influences whereby genetic influence involve the imbalance of neurotransmitters that prevent individual’s brain from functioning efficiently as compared to healthy individuals whereas biological influences such as cognitive deficits that impaired partial brain functions of individuals while environmental influence does not directly...

    Brain, Cortisol, Hippocampus 1775  Words | 6  Pages

  • perspectives

    Lowell Perspectives Life Span & Introduction to Sociology PSYC-2314-S03 In class we have been discussing the analogy of perspectives. A perspective is a way of seeing, also thought of as a ‘point of view’. This mental view or outlook can both enhance and constrain how we view the world in our own eyes. In the field of psychology and sociology there are many ways to perceive our world in which we live. No one perspective alone can define the world. Each perspective has its...

    Book of Optics, Mind, Optics 826  Words | 3  Pages

  • Unipolar Depression

    Unipolar Depression Unipolar depression is a mood disorder that is characterized by depression without mania. Depression and mania are the opposite of each other; depression is a sad sate that one is overwhelmed by all of life’s challenges and mania is when one is on a state of euphoria and has exaggerated beliefs that the world is theirs. Unipolar can be brought on by many different circumstances. Symptoms Symptoms vary from individual to individual but they will affect these five areas of...

    Antidepressant, Bipolar disorder, Lithium pharmacology 935  Words | 3  Pages

  • Biological Anthropology

    Biological Anthropology What is researched within Biological Anthropology? Biological Anthropology studies the behaviours and biological variations of human beings, other primates, and extinct hominin ancestors. This subfield of anthropology provides us with a biological perspective on the variation of humans as a whole. What are some Biological Anthropology Research Methods? Since it is such a broad sub-discipline, the research methods tend to vary. Some biological anthropologists...

    Anthropology, Hominidae, Human 743  Words | 3  Pages

  • Causes of Depression

     CAUSES OF DEPRESSION Causes of Depression HSP3M Feeling sad, or what we may call "depressed", happens to all of us, but for most of us the sensation usually leaves after a while. However, people with a depressive disorder, such as clinical depression, find that their state interferes with their daily life. Depression is a condition of general emotional withdrawal. It is sadness greater and more prolonged and does not always have a reason. For...

    Bipolar disorder, Depression, Dysthymia 1840  Words | 5  Pages

  • Cross-Cultural Depression

    Cross-cultural Depression Rogina Harden Psy/450 January 8, 2013 Stephen Hoyer Cross-cultural Depression Kraft (2013), "Sadness is a short adjustment period. Depression is a long term illness.” What exactly depression is in clearly defined terms and where this disease comes from is something that has been left to discussion for some time. Butcher, Mineka, and Hooley (2013) make it clear to be aware of the cultural and historical context before making labels. However, 350 million depression diagnoses from...

    Culture, Depression, Emotion 828  Words | 3  Pages

  • Depression: Informative Speech

    OUTLINE FORMAT FOR INITIAL SPEECH GENERAL PURPOSE: To Inform the class on depression SPECIFIC PURPOSE: To inform the class on how to cope and live with depression CENTRAL IDEA: Today I am here to talk to you about the symptoms, treatment and how to cope with depression in your daily life. INTRODUCTION I. I will take over your thoughts, control your needs and make you believe you are hopeless, worthless and helpless. I will drain the life right out of you, until you no longer want to get out...

    Antidepressant, Fluoxetine, Major depressive disorder 1174  Words | 4  Pages

  • Perspective

    Watson & Skinner Perspective Psychological perspectives will always change as long as psychology continues to move forward. Not one perspective or approach would be considered wrong or incorrect. It just adds to our understanding of human and animal behavior. Most psychologists would agree that not one perspective is correct, although in the past, early days of psychology, the behaviorist would have said their perspective was the only truly scientific one (McLeod, 2007). Two Psychologists who...

    B. F. Skinner, Behavior, Behaviorism 1368  Words | 4  Pages

  • Discuss two biological explanations of

    Discuss two biological explanations of depression (8+16 marks) AO1: One biological explanation for depression is family studies. Family studies have proved that having a first-degree relative with depression appears to be a risk factor of depression. These studies select people who already have the depression (the probands) and examine whether other members of their family have been, or might be diagnosed with depression. Research has found that around 20% of such relatives have depression compared...

    Bipolar disorder, Dysthymia, Genetics 858  Words | 2  Pages

  • Biological Approach to Depression

    Biological Approach to Depression The biological approach is based on the idea that depression has a physical or organic cause. One explanation suggests that some people are simply more genetically inclined to develop depression, as Hecimovic suggested that it was caused by a mutation in the 5-HTT gene, which was responsible for coding for serotonin production, and that this mutation is inherited. Family studies, twin studies and adoption studies have all helped support the role of genetics in...

    DNA, Genetics, Neurotransmitter 738  Words | 2  Pages

  • Evaluate the biological treatments of depression

    Evaluate the biological treatments of depression. (16 marks) Antidepressants such as monoamine-oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and trycyclics (TCAs) are effective in reducing depressive symptoms. Antidepressants have been tested in trials with placebos and have found to be effective in reducing symptoms of severe depression in around 65% to 75% compared with around 33% for placebos – Gitlin 2002. Gitlin carried out a clinical trial testing selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and placebos...

    Antidepressant, Fluoxetine, Major depressive disorder 775  Words | 2  Pages

  • Biological Psychology

    Biological Psychology Biology is the study of all living things whereas psychology deals with the way these living things behave and react to external and internal stimuli. Biological psychology is the study of how a person’s psyche or behavioral characteristics are influenced by biological reasons found inside the brain or central nervous system. Understanding of this field relies on extensive knowledge of the functioning of the brain and nervous system and of difference psychological disorders...

    Brain, Central nervous system, Mental disorder 1151  Words | 4  Pages

  • Cause of Depression

    Cause of Depression Analysis Worksheet Purpose: The Cause of Depression Analysis Worksheet’s purpose is to guide your steps in analyzing the resources from the Resource List in u06s3 and Capella Library regarding the cause of depression from the perspective you have chosen to research. This worksheet will help lead you through the research process by providing you a systematic way to analyze the resources you have chosen to research. As you review resources, you will use the worksheet to analyze...

    Depression, Emotion, Individual 969  Words | 3  Pages

  • Biological and Humanistic Approaches to Personality

    Running head: BIOLOGICAL AND HUMANISTIC APPROACHES TO PERSONALITY Mileva Repasky PSYC 250 Jean M. Porter University of Phoenix Personality can be defined as “the complex of all the attributes-behavioral, temperamental, emotional and mental-that characterizes a unique individual.” (Princeton University, n.d.) Personality has been studied and explained for a long time and is linked directly to Maslow’s humanistic and biological theories. This paper seeks to describe the biological factors...

    Abraham Maslow, Big Five personality traits, Human behavior 1254  Words | 4  Pages

  • Historical Perspective of Abnormal Psychology

    Historical Perspective of Abnormal Psychology Bridgette Jones PSY/ 410 University of Phoenix Historical Perspective of Abnormal Psychology The study of the human mind and human behavior has evolved over time and remains the world’s greatest mysteries. Historically it has been a fascinating topic that has spanned time and today still remains amongst the most intriguing topics. However, the more ambiguous or culturally predicted behavior becomes it requires an explanation of what is considered...

    Abnormal psychology, Carl Jung, Erikson's stages of psychosocial development 1274  Words | 4  Pages

  • Depression-Paper

     Depression and Genetics Depression is the feeling of extreme sadness, loneliness, hopelessness, helplessness, and worthlessness, which proceed for weeks and prevent normal functioning. It is normal to feel sad and depressed when a significant negative change has happened in one’s life, it is considered an appropriate behavior as long as one can overcome it and resume to normal functioning within a considerable period of time. In my paper, I will be discussing Depression illness, the main...

    Bipolar disorder, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Depression 1088  Words | 4  Pages

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