A Jerney in to the Deaf World

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Chapter notes:

Chapter Notes from Journey Into Deaf-World

Chapter 1

Chapter one is basically an introduction to the issues
that are discussed throughout the book. Chapter one
introduces all the people that are constantly referred
to throughout the book. Ben Bahan is the narrator and
introduces us to Jake Cohan, Laurel Case, Roberto Rivera
and Henry Byrne. Ben is a CODA, Child Of Deaf Adults,
and like many CODA’s tried to stray from the deaf
community be was eventually drawn back to it. He is
currently teaching at the only deaf college called
Galludet University. Each of these characters describes
there lives growing up deaf from when they became deaf,
to how their parents reacted, to how they feel about it
now.
Jake describes himself as a CODA, his parents and
brother are deaf. Naturally he grew up to be a well
adjusted well rounded deaf adult. His parents were
thrilled that he was deaf. Roberto grew up differently.
His family was all hearing, and their first language was
Spanish. His family had a hard time adjusting to the
fact that he was deaf. However his mother eventually
helped him by learning some signs. Laurel’s story was
the most different. Her family was so unset about the
fact that she was deaf that they enrolled her in a
strictly oral program and she spent most of her life not
being able to sign. She explains that she was deprived
of being able to communicate for a good portion of her
life because the school was so oral. Henry lost his
hearing at the age of 21 so his experience was also very
different. He explains that losing his hearing was the
best thing that every happened to him. This sums up the
whole chapter. It is trying to show the reader different
reactions to being deaf, and how deaf people, like
everyone else, have unique stories to tell.
1) What is a CODA and what does it mean?
2) What do many CODA's eventually do?
3) What is the books view on strictly oral schools?
Chapter 2

Posted by Lonnie R on Saturday, June 14, 2003 2:57pm

The response of parents to the advent of a Deaf child is likely to depend on whether the parents are hearing or Deaf. Often to hearing parents they view that child as having a disability. To Deaf parents, however, would prefer having a Deaf child. A Deaf baby in a Deaf household means the Deaf heritage of the family will go on. They are proud of their Deaf genealogy. They view, like most parents , that their child is a reflection of themselves.

A DEAF CHILD BORN TO DEAF PARENTS

The Deaf parents already have a home that functions as an environment conducive to using vision as the main means of learning and development. For instance their doorbells and telephones do not ring. Instead they flash lights each with their own pattern.

They take their Deaf child to Deaf Clubs. The most important thing is that the child will enjoy a full command of language through exposure to ASL.

Most Deaf children of Deaf parents function better than Deaf children of hearing parents in all academic, linguistic, and social areas. Some Deaf children of Deaf parents don’t realize that there are hearing people in the world until they are school age.

Most Deaf parents have hearing children these ones are called “codas”. They frequently function bilingually, using ASL and spoken English with ease.

It is a hard situation when Deaf parents take their Deaf newborn for a doctor check-up. Because being Deaf is viewed negatively doctors often give parents two pieces of advise:

(1) Do not use ASL with your hearing children. They think it will hurt their English speaking capacity. (This is wrong because it will put a huge barrier in Communication with parent and child.)

(2) Put hearing aids on your Deaf child. (Most Deaf parents loath to put prosthesis on their healthy baby. This would make the child look handicap.)

Most Deaf parents ignore such advise and go...
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