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“Disaster management

a communal approach”
A Paper for
National Seminar
“Emerging Facts of Management: Issues and Challenges”
Shri Atmanand Jain Institute of Management & Technology
Ambala City (Haryana)
Atul Goyal
Member, All India Management Association
Lecturer, Department of Business Administration
Jind Institute of Engineering & Technology
Email: - atulg.22@gmail.com

Key Words
* Introduction
* types of disasters
* disaster management
* Community Participation and Team work
* conclusion
* references

‘Disaster is a crisis situation that far exceeds the capabilities’.                                                                      - Quarentelly, 1985.

‘Disaster’ is defined as a crisis situation causing wide spread damage which far exceeds our ability to recover. Thus, by definition, there cannot be a perfect ideal system that prevents damage, because then it would not be a disaster. It has to suffocate our ability to recover. Only then it can be called as ‘disaster’.

Disasters are not totally discrete events. Their possibility of occurrence, time, place and severity of the strike can be reasonably and in some cases accurately predicted by technological and scientific advances. It has been established there is a definite pattern in their occurrences and hence we can to some extent reduce the impact of damage though we cannot reduce the extent of damage itself. This demands the study of disaster management in methodical and orderly approach.

Millions of people breathe their last just because of unawareness about disasters, their mitigations and their cautions when a disaster strikes their zone. Have they taken several steps of safety, they would have been breathing. A disaster whether natural or human-induced, is an event which results in widespread human loss. It is accompanied by loss of livelihood, property, causing suffering and loss in a definite area (which is struck by the disaster). As disasters warn only in some cases and most of the disasters come without any warning, there is often a large loss in life as the habitants in that specific area do not have any idea what will happen next, be it natural like cyclones or human-induced like wars. People who die are died but their relatives, especially those of the poor families face a very painful experience throughout their life and fear is possible to be seen in their eyes.

The continent of Asia is particularly vulnerable to disaster strikes. Between the years 1991 to 2000 Asia has accounted for 83 per cent of the population affected by disasters globally. While the number of people affected in the rest of the world were 1,11,159, in Asia the number was 5,54,439.Within Asia, 24 per cent of deaths due to disasters occur in India, on account of its size, population and vulnerability. Floods and high winds account for 60 per cent of all disasters in India. While substantial progress has been made in other sectors of human development, there is need to do more towards mitigating the effect of disasters.

Many parts of the Indian sub-continent are susceptible to different types of disasters owing to the unique topographic and climatic characteristics. About 54 per cent of the sub-continent’s landmass is vulnerable to earthquakes while about 4 crore hectares is vulnerable to periodic floods. The decade 1990-2000, has been one of very high disaster losses within the country, losses in the Orissa Cyclone in 1999, and later, the Gujarat Earthquake in 2001 alone amount to several thousand crore of Rupees, while the total expenditure on relief and reconstruction in Gujarat alone has been to the tune of Rs 11,500 crore.

Later on in 2008 the process is continued and Bihar in 2009 faces the flood due to Kosi River and according to Bihar Government lose is going...
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