A Concise Encyclopedia of Legal Herbs and Chemicals with Psychoactive Properties

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  • Topic: Solanaceae, Ergoline, Nutmeg
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  • Published : December 9, 2012
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LEGAL H I G H S

A Concise Encyclopedia of
Legal Herbs and Chemicals
with Psychoactive Properties

by
Adam Gottlieb

20th Century Alchemist
This book is not intended to promote or encourage the possession, use, or manufacture of any illegal substances. The material herein is presented for reference and informational purposes only.

The laws applicable to the drugs described herein may change. Remember -- even legal drugs may be dangerous. Consult your physician before consuming any drugs.

For wholesale orders and inquiries contact Merchandising Service of America, Inc., 417 North 3rd Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19123. For individual copies of other books by the 20th Century Alchemist, write to:

Twentieth Century Alchemist
P.O. Box 3684
Manhattan Beach, CA 90266

(C) 1973 20th Century Alchemist

* * *

INTRODUCTION

The materials discussed in this book are legal despite the fact that they have psychotropic properties. Some are far more potent than many controlled substances. They have not been designated as illegal by any state or federal codes, because they are relatively obscure and have never been subjected to abuse. Although chemicals such as mescaline and lysergic acid amide are controlled by Title 21 of the United States Code (1970 edition), their plant sources (except for ergot and peyote) are not so controlled. It is therefore legal to possess San Pedro cactus, morning glory seeds, Hawaiian wood rose, etc., as long as there is no indication that they are intended for other than normal horticultural or ornamental purposes. The materials listed here are legal at the time of this writing. They may be outlawed at any future date. It may be of some interest to some readers that the Church of the Tree of Life has declared as its religious sacraments most saubstances in this book. Because these substances were legal at the time of the Church's inception and incorporation, their use cannot be denied to members through any future legislation without directly violating the Constitution's guarantee of religious freedom. Those interested should send a stamped self-addressed envelope to the Church of the Tree of Life, 405 Columbus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94133.

Although there exist both state and federal laws against Psilocybe mushrooms and peyote, we have included these in our book of legal highs. We do so because of the glaring weaknesses in the legislation regarding these. Peyote is allowed to members of the Native American Church, because it was in use by the Plains Americans as a religious sacrament long before the caucasian immigrants and their progeny devised laws against it. Even today, a number of legitimate cactus nurseries still ship cuttings and seeds of this cactus to all parts of the country with apparent impunity.

Many species of psilocybin-bearing mushroom grow wild throughout most parts of the United States, and can in no way be controlled. Since the original publication of this book, there has been a virtual mushroom revolution. Head shops and mail order houses now sell complete kits for home cultivation of _Psilocybe cubensis_ (spores included). The flagrant ignorance of the law-makers is reflected in the fact that in Title 21 the alkaloid _psilocin_ is misspelled as _psilocyn._ This small error is a product of the same mentality that classified cocaine as a narcotic in the 1922 Amendment to the Narcotic Drugs Import and Export Act and deliberately retains the error to this day.

The purpose of this book is to provide the user with concise reference information on various...
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