A Comparison of Many Men by 50 Cent and Lord of the Flies

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“Violence is not the answer” is a very cliché statement that has been repeated for generations, but ever since the creation of humans, violence has tagged along with humanity. The novel The Lord of the Flies written by William Golding includes a number of young boys stranded on an island without any adults. The song Many Men performed by 50 cent demonstrates the threatening circumstances the character Ralph has to go through during the novel. This is portrayed by the re-enactment of Ralph’s reversal of fortune. Ralph was a sensible elected leader, but lost his popularity and rationale. He is forced to hide and fight back at the end of the novel when his adversary Jack tries to hunt him along with the other boys on the island. In the lyrics it states, “Many men, many, many, many, many men/Wish death upon me” (50 cent 9-10). The alliteration displays the immense number of the people wanting to kill Ralph, and the intensity of their desire to kill him, which conveys Ralph’s frightening and chaotic situation. At the end of the novel, a naval officer comes to the island to rescue the boys and Ralph cries, realizing and regretting the horror of his and his friends’ actions. 50 cent raps, “Have mercy on my soul/Somewhere my heart turned cold” (50 cent, 33-34). Ralph has been changed by the lack of circumstances, and is remorseful for turning into a hated murderous savage. Ralph was a symbol of the civilized part of mankind, but as the novel progressed, he turned more beastly. By the replica of Ralph’s reversal of fortune, the song Many Men rapped by 50 cent displays the violent conditions Ralph experiences during his time on the island. Ralph, who is a character from the novel The Lord of the Flies written by William Golding, struggles with the furthest extent of hatred humans possess within themselves.
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