World War 1 Soldier Paper

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World War I Soldier Paper

HIS/120 U.S. HISTORY 1865 TO 1945

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* Analysis of the role played by American troops in the Second Battle of the Marne and subsequent engagements with the Germans *
Although US troops assumed mainly a support role in this action, the battle came to be known as the beginning of the end for Germany. 85,000 US troops participated, with 12,000 casualties, gaining the praise of not only their own officers, but the French and British commanders as well. "During this time a single regiment of the 3rd Division rewrote one of the most luminous pages in our military history, it prevented the crossing at certain points on its front, while on either flank the Germans who had gained a footing pressed forward (Duffy, 2009).  Our men, firing in three sections, met the German attacks with counter-attacks at critical points and succeeded in throwing two German divisions into complete confusion, capturing 600 (Duffy, 2009). This last quote summarizes American military involvement in World War I. In the "soup of death" that France had become, no secret weapon, technological advance, political maneuvering or mad offensive could have replaced fresh troops used in bold actions along the Allied lines. US involvement not only changed the face of the war, but helped bring it to an end on November 11, 1918 (Duffy, 2009). * Discussion of weaponry used by soldiers in World War I, including but not limited to bayonets, flamethrowers, machine guns, pistols, mustard gas, rifles, tanks and trench mortars *

The US Troops utilized many different types of weapons including the standard bayonet knife which served both as a utility tool and close combat weapon. Officers and NCOs were issued 45 caliber Colts, although some airmen had revolvers. The M-1 Garand semi-auto rifle was the most prevalent weapon. Many NCOs and squad leaders carried the Thompson SMG. The most common version (issued from 1942 on) was not like the Chicago piano from...
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