World War 1 and Peace Plan

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World War 1 and Peace Plan

By | November 2012
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President Woodrow Wilson had a plan for peace in the war known as the Fourteen Points. It was also called “Peace Without Victory.” The plan meant to prevent international problems from causing another war. To promote his plan for peace, Wilson visited Paris, London, Milan, and Rome in Europe. However, the Allies were against Wilson’s Fourteen Points. The Allies wanted to punish Germany for the war. One idea of Wilson’s peace plan was an end to secret treaties. One issue that caused World War I that was addressed in that idea was entangling alliances between the countries. Another idea was a limit on weapons. The issue that lead to World War I that was addressed in that idea was militarism. The most important of Wilson’s Fourteen Points was a League Of Nations, to protect the independence of all countries. The issue that caused World War I that was addressed in that was also the entangling alliances.

The final treaty that was agreed on was the Treaty Of Versailles. Germany thought they were getting Wilson’s peace plan but instead, they got this. The Treaty of Versailles consisted of many ways of punishing Germany. The war guilt clause was a part of the treaty. The war guilt clause stated that Germany had to accept the blame of causing the war. Another part noted that Germany had to give up it’s colonies. It also consisted of the fact that Germany had to pay all war costs. This means they had to pay their war cost, as well as the Allies‘ war costs, which was over $200 billion. The Allies also wanted to disarm Germany. This meant that they wanted to cut off Germany’s army and navy, so they wouldn’t be able to fight another war for a long time.

Did the Treaty of Versailles lead to World War II? The Treaty of Versailles was the way of the Allies to punish Germany. To surrender, Germany accepted Wilson’s Fourteen Points but Germany didn’t get anything close to a peace plan. The treaty resulted in bitterness,...