Womanist vs Feminist

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A Doll’s House
Marvin Rosenberg describes a few of Nora’s characteristics as being dramatic, selfish, seductive and loveable. However the character of Nora started off in the play as playful and timid and became stronger at the play progressed. Through the lies that Nora told and the secrets she kept from her husband she kept the play interesting and the audience wanting more. Nora’s ability to turn her charm and playfulness into being a victim was unexpected. The morals and roles of the individual characters of this play were challenged. The relationship and position of men and women were exaggerated as well as convincing. Joan Templeton writes that Nora’s character in, A Doll’s House was like two different personalities. The obedient and playful Nora portrayed in Acts 1 and 2 could never have become the Nora that was portrayed in Act 3. Joan is not at all convinced by Nora’s character and states that this play has been “largely discredited by critics, directors and actresses.” Joan’s reaction to this play was quite the opposite from Marvin. (Templeton) According to Bernard Shaw, A Doll’s House strictly enforces the role of the man and woman in the marriage as well as what roles they play in a household. The play was typical to family life with drunks and lunatics. Shaw advises that Torvald Helmer is the King of the house and worshipped like a God by his wife. The plot and controversy surfaces by the lies that Nora tells and the secrets kept from her husband. This perfect doll (Nora) changes form and the King (Torvald) is no longer running things and woman’s rights arise. (Shaw)

Shaw, Bernard. A Doll's House Again. Ed. The Saturday Review. 1982. Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism. 6 May 2011 . Templeton, Marvin Rosenberg and Joan. Ibsen's Nora. October 1989. Modern Language Association. 6 May 2011 .
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