Why Romeo's Mood Change When He Realises Mercution Is Dying?

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 98
  • Published : November 5, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Romeo’s mood changes when he realizes that Mercutio is dying as he suddenly becomes regretful ‘that an hour hath (Tybalt) been my kinsman’ and decides that ‘others must end’ over ‘this black day’s fate’, whereas at the beginning of the scene he is very calm and peaceful and tells Tybalt ‘I love thee’ and that the reason he does excuses the need to react aggressively toward the ‘greeting’ Tybalt gives him calling him ‘villain’ as his hate can have ‘no better term’. Romeo is made ‘effeminate’ by Juliet’s love and so his love ‘excuses the appertaining rage’ so he doesn’t harm the Capulet, ‘whose name I (he) tenders as dearly as’ his own as he is married to Juliet. When Mercutio and Tybalt are fighting he still continues to try to keep the peace, and tells Benvolio to help ‘beat down their weapons’ which links to the fight in Act 1 Scene 1 where Benvolio draws his sword to prevent the fighting, showing how they aren’t opposed to force to protect people they care about. When he realises Mercutio is dying he sheds his peace keeping attitude and actively participates in the fight as either him, Tybalt ‘or both’ must go with ‘Mercutio’s soul’ ‘to keep him company’. This also contrasts with the love expressed for Tybalt earlier, as he acts more masculine instead of being ‘effeminate’ as Juliet ‘hath soften’d valour’s steel’and fights to maintain his family’s honour and also avenge the death of his ‘very friend’, which shows two sides to Romeo; one being the courtly lover who is in love with Juliet and the other being an Italian hot-blooded male.
tracking img