Why Is the Periodic Table Periodic

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CIS Chem
12/10/12

Unnecessary Title that’s bold, italicized, and underlined.

The periodic table is a chart of elements set up on the bias of atomic numbers, chemical properties, and their electron configurations. The elements of this chart are organized in families/groups and periods. The word periodic refers to the way the table is ordered, which is in periods and families/groups, and it looks like this: The green ones are the non-metals, the blue ones are alkali metals, the red ones are the alkaline earth, the yellow are the transition metals, the light blue ones are other metals, the purple ones are the metalloids, the pink ones are the halogens, the brown ones are the noble gases, and the gold ones are the rare earth metals. In terms of mass and atomic number, the periodic table reads left to right, and top to bottom. The families/groups are in vertical rows, and all share very similar properties. The noble gas family/group on the right are all similarly un-reactive. The alkali metals on the left are all highly reactive. To summarize everything I just said, I believe the periodic table is periodic because of its overall tear-jerking-ly beautiful structure. It flows like the English words of a book, from left to right, top to bottom. It sorts itself vertically into groups/families that share similar properties. It always keeps similarly classified elements grouped together on the table itself. I consulted with Alex and she also agrees with me in the belief that the periodic table is periodic because of its periodical structure. She agrees that its flow of left to right, top to bottom, and its grouping into families are all reasons that the periodic table is periodic.
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